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AMERICAN HUMOURISTS.*

found with the selection of the quota-
tions is that there are not more of them.

MR. HAWEIS, as a writer, is vexatious to
We do not profess to have been very
the soul of the critic who demands accuracy attentive students of Mr. Haweis' works,
of statement, exact weighing of judgment, but we know his previous books, and have
carefulness and acuteness in analysis, and read several of them through. We
freedom from the impertinence of a slip-low what we should have expected from
fess, however, that this volume falls be-

IF

E.

him. The style is particularly jerky, the
sentences and paragraphs having an irri-
tating resemblance to a succession of
telegrams. The attempts to say smart
things are also irritating, and there is but
little in the best of them which has the
genuine flavour of wit or humour. Take,
for example, such a remark as the fol
lowing about Washington Irving:-

676

shod style. And yet, as often happens, It: while the fastidious and select few are disposed to frown, there is a disposition on the part of the general public to smile, or at least to accept what is given them with a certain readiness and complacency. So we judge, at any rate, from the fact that Mr. Haweis writes so much. He would scarcely continue to send forth book after book, from year to year, unless he had found a considerable circle of readers. Publishing books is a costly process, and although very young authors, especially poets, often begin by sending forth their productions at their own risk,most of them find that the amusement is too expensive to be kept up, and not a few burn their fingers in trying the experiment. Mr. Haweis has of course got a long way past the early stage of an author's experience, and when he sends out a new book he knows what he is about, and knows that be can reckon upon his public.

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ANNUAL MAGAZINE VOLUMES. THIS volume of Good Words (Isbister and Co.), edited by Dr. Donald Macleod, seems to us to be quite equal to any of its predecessors of recent years, and we do not know that con-higher praise can reasonably be asked for. The that he is embarrassed by the quantity of and enticing volume like this before him is difficulty of the reviewer with a substantial material presented to him for his judgment. How to read enough of the book within any tolerably moderate amount of time, and how to moderate amount of space, are problems which write adequately about is within any tolerably often sorely trouble a critic with a conscience. Alas! in this, as in so many other enterprises, we must satisfy ourselves with something short of the ideal, both

"Like other men of talent, Irving took, to the law, but the law did not take to him.

"He took also to the daughter of his law-coach, who took to him, but died at the age of eighteen."

Two reasons appear to us to account for Mr. Haweis' popularity, so far as he is popular. First, he is happy in his choice of subjects; and, secondly, he knows how to make what he has to say interesting. Whatever the critics say, the public will pardon a good deal-indeed, they will pardon almost anything-if only these two conditions be fulfilled. This is, of course, no excuse for an author's carelessness or for his faults; it does not entitle him to exemption from critical chastisement; but it is, at any rate, a ribute to merits which are real and valuable in their way, and are not to be iespised, even by critics.

In the present volume, which consists of six lectures on "American HumourEsts," viz, Washington Irving, Oliver Vendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell, Artemus Ward, Mark Twain, and Bret Harte, Mr. Haweis' characteristic faculty oes not wholly fail him. He has cerainly chosen a good subject, and one hich, so far as we know, has not yet en comprehensively and adequately ealt with; and he has contrived to put gether rather more than two hundred ages of, for the most part, very readable Not that Mr. Haweis himself has ry much to say on the subject, of special te or value, but his instinct has stood m in good stead, and he has made his ges interesting by filling a considerable Ember of them with quotations from the hors whom he has selected as repretative American humourists. He has, fact, let the humourists speak for mselves, and the only fault to be marican Humour-sts. By the Rev. H. R. Haweis,

atter.

in the matter of reading and writing: To begin with, let us make a clean breast of it by confessing that we have only dipped into the stories. The three principal ones are by writers whose names and hose characteris

64

tic qualities are familiar to most readers ; —
"The Golden Shaft," by Mr. Charles Gibbon ;
"Kept in the Dark," by Mr. Anthony Trollope;
and Lady Jane," by Mrs. Oliphant. A large
number of the papers, essays, and shorter
contribution-many of them by writers of
great eminence-we have read with much
interes. First in the volume is the touching
and beautiful paper by the Archbishop of Can
terbury, entitled Some Hints for a Life of
Dean Stanley." Later, we find a charming
Harte,
little paper, full of poetic
half-a dozen noble sermons by the Rev.
R. W. Dale, M.A.; three impressive discourses
by the Bishop of Peterborough; two important

"

66

on Longfellow." There are

papers on "The Place of the Old Testament in the Christian Church," by Professor Robertson Smith; and many other contributions of a religious kind of a high order. Health, Science, Travel, Philanthropy, Social Life, are the respective subjects of useful and enterto a high standard of excellence, and altotaining papers. The illustrations are kept up gether we cannot too cordially commend the magazine which this volume represents to readers who have not yet the good fortune to be familiar with it.

Surely this is very poor fooling; and there is a good deal of the same sort in the book. Mr. Haweis is at his best when he sticks to plain, sharply-summarised statements of biographical fact, and when he is picking brief iilustrative sentences or longer passages from the writers upon whom he discourses. It is fair to him to say that he has a grave purpose running through his pages. Glancing backwards, his 66 Epilogue," at what he has said, he observes:- "I have taken pains to vindicate the dignity and importance of the subject, by proving to you that wit is not only the best sense in the world,' but that it is Moral, Recreative, and Stimulating in a very high degree.

in

"I have shown that people who are not ashamed of Wrong are often afraid of Ridicule, and I have kept steadily before you, what I myself most firmly hold, that, wisely used and well, Wit is a most effective Disciplinarian, and one of the greatest sweeteners and purifiers of Life."

elited by the Rev. Benjamin Waugh, forms a The Sunday Magazine (Isbister and Co.), handsome and delightful volume, which deserves a welcome in every home. The illustrations first demand a word of special notice and commendation. They are certainly unsurpassed, we might, perhaps, say unrivalled, by those of any of our English magazines not exclusively devoted to art. To find anything in general periodical literaturo equal to them, for felicitousness of con. and finish, we must look to the other side ception, delicacy of execution, and grace of the Atlantic, to Harper's, or the Century, and pay double the money or more. We need

Although we are unable to speak in very warm terms of this volume, we can quite understand and believe that the lectures of which it consists "appeared to receive the hearty approval of 'crowded houses' both in the East and West of London." This only affords another illustration of the fact, which has been not here enter into detailed notice of the often noticed, that a good deal which these pages, but we may mention as a special numerous graceful pictures to be found in will pass muster with an audience, is not attraction, the half-a-dozen portraits of "Our equally successful when it challenges the principal Contributors," given in the volume attention of a critical reader. Many dis- before us. The names are: Hesba Stretton, courses may be effectively, and even useL. T. Meade, and Sarah Doudney, and George fully said, which it is hardly worth while Wood, MA. The portraits all look as if they Macdonald, A. R. H. Boyd, D.D., and J. G.' to print. We are reminded of what Mr. must be life-like, although that of Dr. MagHaweis himself remarks about "Bretonald represents the original rather as he Harte": "When a man decides to re-appeared ten or fifteen years ago than as he print what the public will, perhaps, the year is by Georg Macdonald, and is enappears to-day. The leading serial story of irreverently call his pot-boilers, it is often titled found that a good many of them are Weighed and Wanting." It deals in a grave, reflective, and earnest way with some neither better nor worse than a good serious problems of character and conduct and many essays written by several other their development. As the title suggests, the People who possess no particular spark of prominent, and there is a good deal that is

66

element of moral weakness and failure is

"2

London: Chatto and Windus. 1833. 62,

painful, some things, indeed, which are re.

pulsive, in the events and circumstances described. Readers of Mr. Macdonald's writings are familiar with his way of constant pausing for the purpose of enforcing lessons and truths of weight and significance, and those who merely want a story for excitement and amusement are often impatient of this "preaching" as they call it. But Mr. Macdonald is a true preacher, although, like other mortals, not without his foibles and mannerisms, and his pages are full of wholesome and searching lessons for the conscience and the heart; and this study of family life is calculated to serve some high purposes, and it bears the stamp of its author's genius. Then there is a serial in twenty-three chapters, "Justice Warren's Daughter: A New England Story," by Miss Birrell; one, in eighteen chapters, "What's in a Name," by Miss Douduey, and several shorter ones, among which a pathetic and graphic little tale, entitled 'King Roy," by Miss L. T. Meade, deserves special mention. There are nine Biographical Papers," including sketches of Dr. John Brown, Dr. Raleigh, Charles Darwin, and Longfellow. Some twenty contributions relate to the wonders and beauties of Nature; nearly as many are on Biblical

Jose and Benjamin.

66

..

By Professor F. Delitzsch, Ph.D. (Hodder
and Stoughtor.) This charming tale of
Jerusalem in the time of the Herods was
written some years ago by Dr. Delitzsch, of
Leipzig, the well-known Oriental scholar.
The author's profound acquaintance with old
Hebrew literature renders his delineation of
the times specially valuable, and it will, we be-
lieve, be welcome to many English readers.
The author states that "it is a piece of his
own life reflected in an historic mirror, but
written for the glory of God and of His Christ;'
and he adds, "Let those who find the book too
sentimental forget the two friends, and fix
their attention on the archæology." The
injunction will, however, be scarcely needed,
for the story, in its pathetic revelation of an
affection strong as that of David and Jonathan,
never transgresses the bounds of genuine
interest, Benjamin, a youth of good family,
and José, his friend, of somewhat lower social
position, discuss together the doctrine of the
Nazarene. José is a devout follower of the
Lord Jesus Christ, and longs to bring his
friend to the same faith. The struggle of
mind brings Benjamin into a condition of
physical suffering, and at length he and his
widowed mother have to own that he is
afflicted with the terrible scourge of leprosy.
The curious details of the ancient ceremonial
in its treatment of the leper are given with
delicacy and clearness. José will not forsake
his friend. He procures him a home beyond
the city walls with his uncle, who is a sincere
Christian, and through love of the Crucified has
broken those fetters which the ceremonial law
of Moses imposed on the law of self-denying
love. Sojourning among believers in Christ,
Benjamin proves the reality of the religion
they profess and gradually turns from the
traditions of his fathers to the purer religiou
of the Christ. During his illness he makes the
subject of athletics, and other youthful pur-acquaintance of James, the Lord's brother,
who is instrumental in forming the youth's
suits and pastimes. The magazine may not
convictions. At length, in an hour of special
be ideally perfect-probably even the editor
does not find that it realises all his concep- its hold, and he is shortly convalescent. The
religious fervour, the terrible scourge loosens
story is of the slightest, but serves admicably
the author's purpose of contrasting the old and
new dispensations, and of expounding some
interesting archæological points.

subjects, some of them being treated practi-
cally, others critically; and about the same
number are devoted to philanthropical and
missionary subjects. Besides, we find Travel
papers and others which may be classed as
Miscellaneous, and between forty and fifty
poetical contributions; the last-named item
perhaps being somewhat in excess of its due
proportion. Further we must note the
Monthly Survey," a comprehensive and
thoughtful glance at current events, and
"Sunday Evenings with the Children," a use-
ful and interesting feature, which may be
taken as the Editor's speciality. The
zine altogether is in the highest degree whole-
some, entirely free from cant and drivel, such
aз so often unfortunately find a place in our
nominally religious literature, and we give it
our unqualified good word and our cordial
greeting.

66

Boy's Own Annual, a good many of them, in-
deed, being marked by considerable taste and
skill. The stories appear to be intended to
promote the cultivation of womanly virtues
and graces, and to warn against every-day
perils from temperament and circumstance. A
good point in the magazine is that it devotes
a good deal of space to information on matters
relating to domestic economy, and also to
articles intended to suggest to girls happy and
pleasant, as well as useful, forms of occupation,
and in this way helps to meet the case of that
large number of young girls who suffer from
the want of something to do. The popularity
which the magazine has achieved has been
fairly won, and may be approved even by the
critic without misgiving.

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A Popular Handbook of Christian Evi dences.

By John Kennedy, M.A., D.D. (London: Sunday-school Union.) This, the second part of Dr.Kennedy's work on the evidences, deepens our sense of its value and usefulness. With that clearness, force, and succinctness which charac terise all the author's apologetic writings, he presents his arguments in a manner which cannot fail to carry conviction to the minds of his readers. Taking "Christ and Christianity" as his theme, he grapples with it in seven chapters. Commencing with "The Historie Beginnings of Christianity," he passes on to consider "The Founder of Christianity; what He was According to Himself and His First Fol lowers." A chapter on the internal evidence of the reality of the Gospel portraiture of Christ prepares the way for the Christ as foretold by Old Testament prophecy. Then follow chapters on "The Christ of the Gospels Certified by His Miracles," and by His Resur rection from the dead. The last chapter on the "Corroborative Evidences" deals with the moral teaching of Christ, the character formed by the imitation of Christ, the early Christianity. We commend both the parts successes of Christianity, and the effects of of this work to all who, either in classes of individually, are beginning the study of the

evidences.

An Essay on the Philosophy of Self-Cor· sciousness.

By P. F. Fitzgerald. (London: Printed for the Author by Trubner and Co., Ludgate hill. 1882). The Preface to Mr. Fitzgerald's essay is certainly one to stimulate interest and curiosity. Most writers consider that a single discovery is enough to justify the production of a book; here we are promised three. T author claims to have struck a new vein exploring man's" intellectual, moral, and affe tional" nature; to have proved the actual and positive existence of metaphysical conceptions the "essential correlative reciprocity of emotions," and to have found a corelosite answer to Mr. Mallock's question, “Is life worth living?" by identifying happiness s the "realisation of our ideals." The book. are also told, is to serve as "a vade-mecunf

maga

The Boy's Own Annual is a large, handsomelooking volume, consisting of the year's num

bers of the Boy's Own Paper, published by the Religious Tract Society. Fiction occupies a very large space in proportion to other contents in this publication, some half-a-dozen stories being carried on from month to month simultaneously. This, we think, is to be regretted. The stories present considerable variety in subject and method of treatment, and, we may add, considerable difference so far as merit is concerned. Looking through the copious index, and then turning over the pages, we find that room is found for a fair amount of attention to be paid to the

tions of what it might be-but so far as we are able to judge, its general tone is healthy, and the interest and entertainment which it

affords are of a wholesome kind. We should

The Book-Lover's Enchiridion.

like to see something better in the way of
illustrations. It would be on many accounts
better to familiarise boy-readers with a higher
This big Greek word simply means hand-
standard of illustrative art than appears even
book, and the little volume is so small that it
to be aimed at here. Upon the whole-recog- might almost be called a finger-book, for a
nising room for improvement in some direc-good-sized hand would completely cover it.
tions-we may say with confidence that parents The only fault to be found with it is its ex-
need not hesitate to place this book in the cessively small print, which it requires very
hands of their boys; and it is important to sharp eyes indeed to read. It is, however, a
add that we are quite sure that the boys will very dainty little tome. The binding, in
welcome it gleefully and read it eagerly. enamelled white paper with black lettering
and red edges, is exquisite. The pages con-
sist of selections from more than a hundred
authors, both ancient and modern, in praise
of the solace and companionship of books. It
can be had in London from Messrs. Simpkin,
Marshall, and Co. Price 4s. 6d.

The Girl's Own Annual is the yearly volume formed by the monthly parts of the Girl's Own Paper, published like the corresponding volume for boys, just noticed, by the Religious Tract Society. The illustrations are of a somewhat higher order than those of the

rational thinking, and for the conduct of li
After careful examination, we are bounit
confess that we are none the wiser for cr
labour, and that the author's methods are is
mysterious as his conclusions. The most i
teresting part of the book is the mass of c-
tracts, extending over more than forty page
Too many of these passages are misquoted
of course, there is the inevitable "Fresh fla
and pastures new;" but it is a novelty to lear
that" man shall not live by bread alone, it
by the word-or rational communion."
The Student's Handbook of Philosophy

Psychology.

By B. F. Cocker, D.D., LL.D., Professor 1 Hodder and Stoughton. 1882. 6s. 6d.) Its the University of Michigan, &c., &c. (Loni somewhat difficult to tell for what class of readers this handbook is intended. To th inexperienced student it would be of no val without elaborate explanation and an amp commentary. The scholar, on the other hard would find considerable parts of the book in complete and fragmentary. For instance, discussing the nature of pleasure and pa Dr. Cocker is content to give, in a sur of half-a-dozen lines, the essence of Sir Wi liam Hamilton's theory, with a brief commer tary of his own, in which the opinions adverse critics are incidentally mentioned but without the arguments by which ant gonistic views are supported; nor is there ar attempt to sketch the development of p sophic thought on this and other points controversy. So far as we can see, the volu though it shows wide reading on the part the author, combined with some critic

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power, will not be of much service to student | The Al Reader:

there are upward of forty-five. During the coming or teacher.

A Selection of Popular Pieces Suitable for year Dr. Holmes promises to keep himself busy with Hand Work and Head Work :

Reading in Public or at the Fireside. From his pen." Their Relation to One Another, and the

the Best Authors. Edited by Alfred H. Mr. Dutton Cook is about to publish, under Reform of Education on the Principles of Miles. (London: Sunday School Union.). the title of “ Nights at the Play,” a select number of Froebel. By the Baroness Bertha von M. Mr. Miles has done well to supplement his

the theatrical reviews he has contributed to the Press Bülow. Translated by Alice M. Christie. Reciter by this Reader. This selection is

in the course of the last fifteen years. A complete (London: W. Swan Sonnenschein and Co.) admirably made, comprising, as it does, exThis is a valuable work which deserves the tracts from the prose works of Dickens, Scott, chronicle of the dramatic occurrences of that period adrantage of larger type and more open pages i Longfellow, Holmes, Barrett, Poe, and many will, we believe, not be attempted, though the work than have been accorded to it in the volume others. While there are one or two old will afford a sufficient general view of the modern conbefore us. Froebel's educational system was favourites included, the greater number of dition of the English theatre, and will form a valuable founded upon the idea that the training and the pieces have never, to our knowledge, contribution to any future history of our stage. The schooling of boys and girls ought to bear direct appeared in any other selection. Mr. Miles reviews will range from the first appearance in Lon. and well-considered reference to their future himself supplies some clever “take don of Mrs. Scott Siddons in 1867, to the producplaces and duties in the world, or indeed in sketches, among which, specially worthy of tion of Mr. Sims's first melodrama in 1881. the universe, as men and women. The ex-notice, are “ Signor Borlini, the Tenor, and

A movement has been started to promote the position of his principles here given is clear Octavious Silverjingle, the Poet." and full, and at the same time compact. There Anna Cavaije; or, the Ugly Princess.

purchase of some original drawings by John Leech

from Miss Leech, for the Manchester Royal Instilu. is much thoughtful wisdom in these pages, deserring earnest study and attention. If the

By Sarah Doudney. (London: Hatchards.) tion. Among others who have expressed themselves children of the working classes were taught as

A governess's troubles with an odd, passionate, strongly in favour of the idea are the Duke of DevonFröebel would have them taught, our various wayward pupil, do not promise to furnish very shire, Lord Derby, who have each subscribed £,20 ; agricultural and manufacturing interests entertaining reading; but, in Miss Doudney's the Baroness Burde:t-Coutts, £, 10; Sir F. Leighton, would soon be greatly benefited, and human hands, the difficulties of Eva Gower with the R.A., Mr. J. F. Millais, R.A., Mr. Frith, R. A., happiness would be largely promoted.

little, wilful but high-born Anna Cavaije, “the Mr. Jacob Bright, M.P., Mr. Henry Irving, Mr. E.

ugly princess,” are invested with an attrac. J. Boehm, and Mr. J. Tenniel. Maori Religion and Mythology.

Ata meeting held tion wbich will keep most who take up the By Edward Shortland, M.A., M.R.C.P., book from laying it down uutil they find that chairman, Mr. Oliver Heywood, remarked that, from

on the subject in Manchester on Saturday, the author of "Traditions and Superstitions of Anna goes up to heaven to lose her bad temper; the gratifying manner in which the suggestion to the New Zealandera.” (London: Longmans and that Eva is married to the brave Douglas and Co. 1882.) The curious and important Kerr. The story is gracefully written, and

secure some of the great artist's works for Manches. material of this volume was collected by the has many pleasing sketches of character.

ter had been received he looked forward confidently author in two ways. A native of good birth

to the success of the movement. Garnered Sheaves. and authority who could write, sent him from By Mrs. Emma Raymond Pitman. (Blackie

More than two millions of readers visited the time in MS., such information as he possessed or could obtain, from the wise men of his and Son.) The good work which may be done Manchester Free Libraries during the twelve months family. But, for the most part, the anthor by an earnest Sunday-school teacher, and the just ended. To nearly half of these books were Frote at the dictation of his native informants, reward which it brings, are admirably described issued, the remainder presumptively having used the The subjects upon which Mr. Shortland is in this story, whilst the consequences attend libraries merely to read the periodic ils on the tables. able, in this way, to throw much light are,

ing the adoption of vicious courses by the Altogether, considerably more than a million of "Maori Cosmogony and Mythology;

" Re: young are graphically depicted. It should be volumes were handed over the counters, of which ligicus Rites of the Maori ;' " The Maori read by every youth who is leaving school and

more than 210,000 were used in the reference library. Chief of Olden Time;” “Claiming and Naming home for business.

The attendance on Sundays averages about 4:000. Land;" and, “The Maori Land Tenure.” In

Four of the branch libraries are now, it appears, pro. an appendix, he gives a short vocabulary of

vided with special reading-rooms for boys, who have the Maori words made use of in the volume.

LITERARY TABLE TALK,

used in the course of the year 190,493 volumes. Mr. Students of comparative religion and ethnology will give a hearty welcome to Mr. Short

The attempt made to put a stop to the Evening Baker, Mayor of Manchester, states that the“ boys' land's little volame. News by asking for a winding-up order does not

continue to grow in favour, and are well seem to have succeeded.

filled during the whole time they are open with quiet The Remote Antiquity of Man not Proven.

Mr. Joseph Bee, for many years a Parliamen. and interested juveniles. Primeval Man uot a Savage. By B. C. Y. tary reporter, has just died at the age of 79. The The Daily News' correspondent, writing from (London: Elliot Stock.) Whoever takes deceased gentleman had lived in retirement for some Paris, says : -"The morning and evening papers are up this volume with a prejudice will soon find that the author is no novice, but a man of wide years past.

full of Victor Hugo's drama, which was not over until

We understand that Sir Erskine May proposes half.past one in the morning. It was nearly two when scientific knowledge, great independence of judgment, and considerable force of reasoning to add to his work on Parliamentary Procedure

the poet was cheered by the students and working Following certain scientific authorities in the

a chapter summarising the new rules now being classes who had assembled in front of the theatre, and deductions they make as to the antiquity of man passed through the House of Commons, and illus

waited in the cold for many hours in the hopes of from care and alluvial deposits, extinct mam- trating their operation.

seeing him drive away. The enthusiasm was very malia associated with human remains, kitchen Mr. Gladstone, in recognition of the literary great. The poet's carriage could only go at a walkmiddens, pile villages, the Glacial period, merits of the late Mr. Forsyth, who was for thirty ing pace until it got out of the crowd. A way was Egypt, &c., the author not only proves that years editor of the Aberdeen Journal, has been respectfully apened, and the mingling of deference they have been guilty of making unwarrant- | pleased to make a grant to Mrs. Forsyth of 450 and enthusiasm was very remarkable. Although the able assumptions, but shows how theory after from the Royal Bounty Fund. theory has been disproved by new discoveries

carriage window was down, no attempt was made to and fresh evidence. He shows one thing, at

A table that belonged to Fielding, the novelist, shake him by the hand, Between the acts the Jeast, in a conclusive manner-viz., that we have has been presented to the Somersetshire Archäolo- ppet, to escape from the stifling heat of the crowded not yet arrived at the period when the antiquity gical Society by Mr. R. D. Kingslake, J.P., on theatre, went twice into the square before the Fran.

Wherever he of mau can be settled by the discoveries of behalf of Mr. Merthyr Guest, its late owner. çais, leaning on M. Vacquerie's arm. science. The volume will well repay the study Fielding was a native of Somerset.

appeared, a lane was made at once, and hats were of both scientific and non-scientific readers.

Mr. T. N. Evans, a worthy teetotaller, has taken off. He looked grave, and, I thought, some. Florence Godfrey's Faith.

published an amusing little book under the title of what fatigued. Every care was taken by his friends By Mrs. Emma Raymond Pitman. (Lon

“ The Picture Gallery of Bacchus ; or, Temperance to economise his strength. For the greater part of don: Blackie and Son.) A story which will be Readings on Public Signs.” It is an attempt the evening he sat in a ground-floor box; his arms eagerly read by bogs, and which can hardly to improve, that is, to extract a moral out of, the folded on his breast, and his back against the fail to promote the growth of a manly type of Famous History of Sign-boards,” published by partition facing the scene. In this position he Christian character. The adventures of "Alf” Chatto and Windus not long ago.

was only visible to those exactly opposite. They Godfrey at sea, and of his father, and mother, and sister, the heroine, in Australia, are full of resignation of his professorship at the Harvard

An American contemporary says :~" By the happened to be the Princess Mathilde, Prince Napo

leon, who remained in the background, M, and interest, whilst for Florence's lover, Mark Lisburn, nothing but admiration can be felt. Medical School, Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes has Madame Emile Ollivier, and M. Emile Augier. One There is a little want of artistic skill in con

conferred a benefit on the reading public, but in. of those who had witnessed the first representation of struction, but the variety of incident affords flicted a loss upon his alma mater. For thirty-five the drama, and was last night present at its revival, ample compensation. It is a book which might years he has served as professor of anatomny, and at was a senator, M. Schoelcher, who had been the be put with advantage into the hands of boys the time of his appointment, in 1847, he was one of poet's companion in exile. M. Brisson, who, with in the senior classes of Sunday-schools. the six professors attached to the school. To-day his wife, occupied a box on the first tier behind the

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balcony, where I happened to be seated, called

attention to an old lady on the second tier, and SUITABLE FOR PRESENTATION. I LONGMAN'S MAGAZINE, No. II

Now Ready,

said, 'There is surely a revenant of 1832.' She
was dressed in the mode of that year, with a gigantic
beaver bonnet, and turned out to have been a
fashionable beauty in that year. M. Grévy went
away before the play was over.
The Grand Duke
Vladimar took his place."

PUBLICATIONS OF THE WEEK.

Akers (E.), Rock me to Sleep, Mother, small 4to
(S. Low & Co.)
Alcock (D.), The Roman Student, &c., imp. 16m
(Unwin)

I

Arnold (F.), Turning Feints in Life, cr Evo (Bentley)

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v.l.

A Thousand Years Hence, cro (S. Low & Co.)
arbara's Warning, er svo (F. V. White)
Book-lover's Enchiridion, 32 mo (Simpkin) ..
Bruce (C.), World in Pictures (The), cr 8vo (Cas-
sell and Co.)
Charlesworth (M. L.), Heave ly Counsel, cr
(~eeley)...
(laston (E. C.), A Girl's Destiny, 3 vols, er
(Finley)
Clough (A. H.), A Monograph, by S. Waddington,
Ev (Bell

8vo

vo

7

Day (L. F.), Every-day Art, cr Evo (Batsford) 7 De (R. H.), Se tled La d Act, cr 8vo (Butterworth)

Farran)...
Cibon (C.), A Golden Shaft, 3 vols. cr 8vo
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Haggard (W. H. D.), Vazir of I ankuran, 12mo
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Helmann (B.), The Belton Scholarship, cr 8vo
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Hid (C. A.), The Age to Come, cr 8vo (C. K. Paul
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Hobart (W. K.) Medical Language of St. Luke,
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Howell (W. D.), Writings, ten vols., in box (Simp.
kin)

Hudson (T. S.), Scamper through America, cr 8vo (riffith & Farraŋ)

Jarrett (T.), Hebrew Text of the Old Covenant, 2 vols. 8vo (Bell)

...

Jonson (J.), Uncle Ben's Little Stories, small 4to (Partridge)

I edger (E.), The Son, &c., cr Svo (Stanford) Livingstone (D.), Life, by Blaikie, cr evo edition (Murray)

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Edwards (M. B.), Exchange Lo Robbery, 2 vols, cr 8v (Hurst & Blackett)

21

Edwards (T.), The Scotch Natura'ist, cr 8vo (Mur-
ray)

Fi zrald P., Recreations of a Literary Man,
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Froude (J. A.), Shot S.udi s in G.eat Subjects, 8vo
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Gaum (M.), Catechism of Perseverance, Vol. 4, cr
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6

7 6
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6

Ce lie (Mrs.), Dolly, Dear, cr 8vo (Griffith &

3

2 6

6

31 6

6

2

5

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16

21

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Macarthy (J.), History of our Own Times, Vol.
cr 8vo (Chatto)

Marshall (E.), Constantia Carew, cr 8vo (Seeley) ..
Martin (J. W.), Float-fishing, cr 8vo (Low)..
Molett (J. N.), Illustrated Dictionary of Words
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Oldenburg (H.), Buddha: His Life, &c., 8vo (Wil-
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Old Norse Sagas, cr 8vo (Sonnenschein)
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....

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0

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Scott (L.), Messer Agnolo's Household, cr Svo
(Longmans)

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Scott (.), Renaissance of Art in Ita'y (Low)
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6

Stebbing (G.), Edward Bertram, cr 8vo (Ward &
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Wagner (D. W.), Epics and Romances, 8vo (Son-
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ton)
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Any of the above works and others may be had of James Clarke & Co., 13 and 14, Fleet-street, London, E.C., POST FREE, for the published price.

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MISS FERRIER'S NOVELS.
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DECEMBER.
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THICKER THAN WATER. By JAMES PAYN. Chapters
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Jennie's Child. By Lucy WARDEN BEARNE.

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By
[Nearly Ready.

SINGER'S
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THE PHILOSOPHY OF MISSIONS: A Present-day Plea.

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innocent mirth.-CAMBRIDGE INDEPENDENT PRESS.

ARE THE

SIMPLEST,

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FOR EVERY DESCRIPTION OF SEWING.

£4 4s.

ON

AT

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MACHINES

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WITH OPTION OF PURCHASE,

AND

HIRE

MACHINES!

TO

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PER WEEK

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facturing Company's Machines? The

By

[Now Ready. public will draw their own inference-

Gold is Continually Counterfeited, Brass

and Tin Never.

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BUY ONLY AT THE OFFICES OF

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