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has been unaccompanied by some quid pro quo, approaching in appearance or reality to a compensation. Double full batta was abolished, but full batta extended ; and the government barracks sold on stipulated terms to individuals : Colonels lost their table money, but gained in return off-reckonings for life in England. All and every one of these Reforms were exceedingly gainful to the State ; but they were not without advantages to individuals.

The great principle of the Pay Code, however, was untouched, viz. that every Regimental Officer should have quarters besides half batta; or if without quarters, an additional half batta. Had the new order in taking away this extra half batta, provided for re-purchasing the sold quarters, and returning to the ancient Barrack system of 1795, no officer could have had the smallest pretext for complaint. The just pretext which is furnished, arises from this : that the extra half batta being taken away, the individual has not his quarters, water, and sweeping ; but something considerably less than the equivalent under the name of House Rent to provide himself.

It has been said by some who profess to be learned in the law, that where no wrong' can be made out, there has been no Right' violated : but as no action could be maintained in any known British Court, for Pensions withheld, or Pay

-no ' wrong' has been done, and no right could have existed. Certain it is, no action could lie; for there is no indenture’-no hand and seal—no‘ subscribing witness’---no'stamping duty'--no 'memorandum of agreement' even, on which we may have our equity. It is not in the Bond, we are not hired by treaty or capitulations' like the Swiss Regiments in France.

To minds of the stamp which this sort of reasoning and this jargon are calculated to satisfy, it would be vain were we to urge arguments founded on mere National and Corporate faith; or on the honourable interpretation-favourable to the weaker party—which sound policy, and public gratitude or generosity demand, in cases like ours. But we may surely hope that our Honourable Masters have been surprised into a mistaken or imperfec view of our real claims on them; and that at least the retrospective effect of the late Half Batta orders will be revoked. Hard as the service will be for future Cadets entering the army on reduced allowances, there cannot be a shadow of right to complain of broken faith, when the terms are mutually understood and previously agreed upon.

PROBUS.

reduced, ergo,

We find, on reference to the curious volume, alluded to by our correspondent, Appendix X. that this concluding paragraph was the especial manufacture of the Right Honourable President of the Board of Controul, in substitution for a somewhat less precise and solemn conclusion, proposed by the Honourable Court of Directors.

While on this subject, we may as well notice that p. 270 of the same Appendix X. irrevocably connects the Pay Table with the pledges and promises our correspondent has quoted, as will be seen by the following brief, but pithy paragraph :

• The pay and allowances to the several officers included in this arrangement, are to be fixed agreeably to the table transmitted herewith, subject to the following regulation :

• As the promotion in the whole of the Company's army will fully compensate for the diminution of certain allowances which have occasioned jealousies and discontents between the establishments at the different

. Presidencies, we have resolved, that double full batta to officers be abolished ; that the half batta, as now allowed at Bengal, and at the same rates, be made general to all the King's and Company's officers under the other Presidencies, except to colonels, who are always to be allowed full batta, and that full batta. be the highest allowance of that kind, to be granted in any situation whatever, except in the case of officers doing duty in the Vizier's dominions, who shall have such an additional allowance as the Bengal Government may deem adequate to defray the extra charges incurred by officers in that particular station,

* The allowance which has hitherto been made to field officers under the head of revenue money, commission on the revenues or dewannee, is to be discontinued both to the King and Company's officers.

The allowances to colonels on your establishment, from the Bazar duties, are also to be abolished, together with every other extra allowance not specified in the tables.

As we mean, that all the subalterps in our armies at the different Presidencies shall be on the same footing with respect to allowances, we direct, that the addiditional pay of one rupee per day to subalterns at your presidency, be discontinued to all subalterns promoted from cadets, appointed subsequent to the date of this dispatch.' -EDITOR HURKARU.

Disposition of Effects of Deceased Soldiers.—A General Order, of May 28th, publishes a recapitulation of Art. 4, Geo. IV. cap. 18, amending 58 Geo. III., cap. 78, by which it is enacted, That it shall be lawful for all officers and persons who may be employed, or required by or under the authority of the Articles of War, in force for the time being, either for the officers or soldiers in the service of his Majesty, or for the European officers or soldiers in the service of the said Company, to take care of, or collect, or superintend and direct the collection of the effects of officers or soldiers dying in service out of the united kingdom, to ask, demand, and receive any such effects, and to commence, prosecute, and carry on any actions or suits for the recovery thereof, without taking out any letters of administration, either with any will annexed or otherwise, in like manner in every respect as if such officers or persons had been appointed executors, or had taken out letters of administration of such effects; and no registers of any Court in the East Indies, or elsewhere, in any colonies or possessions of his Majesty abroad, shall in any manner interpose in relation to any such effects, unless required or authorized so to do by any such officers or persons under the provisions of this act; any act, or acts of Parliament, law, statute, or usage to the contrary notwithstanding. Effects or proceeds of effects, when remitted to any regimental agent, or other person, under any order or regulation of the Secretary at War in that behalf, or of the military Secretary to the Government, or any of the said Company's Presidencies respectively, shall not, by reason of coming into the hands of such agent or person, be deemed or taken to be assets or effects within the province in which such agent or person shall reside, so as to render it necessary that administration should be taken out in respect thereof in such province, unless administration of any other effects of the officer or soldier to whom the proceeds so remitted, shall have belonged, shall have been, or shall be taken out, in such province; and it shall be lawful for the Secretary at War, in all cases relating to the effects of any officer or soldier in his Majesty's service, and for the military Secretary to the Government of the Presidency, to which the deceased officer or soldier shall have belonged, in all cases relating to the effects of any European officer or soldier in the service of the said Company, in order that any such effects, or proceeds of any such effects, shall be remitted to any other place where the same can be more conveniently paid over to the person or persons entitled thereto; and the obedience to any such orders, by any agent or person to whose hands any such effects shall come, shall be a sufficient discharge to such agent or person ; and no such agent or person shall be liable to any action or suit, by reason of any such effects, or proceeds of such effects, having been in his hands, and hereafter transmitted under the order of the Secretary at War or military Secretary, re.. spectively, in their behalf. The Secretary, in the case of any officer or soldier in his Majesty's service, and for the military Secretary to the Government of the Presidency to which the deceased officer or soldier shall have belonged, in the case of any European officer or soldier in the service of the said Company, to order or direct the payment of any charges or expenses attending or relating to the illness or funeral of any such officer or soldier, out of any such effects, or proceeds of effects, or out of any arrears of pay or half-pay, and that such charges and espenses, together with all regimental debts and military payments, which may be allowed under the provisions of any act or acts of Parliament, or Articles of War, made in pursuance thereof, shall be made of such effects, or proceeds of effects, or arrears of pay or half-pay, and the surplus only, after such payment, shall be deemed the personal estate of the deceased. Orientul Herald, Vol. 23.

2

A STATEMENT

OF THE

RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF THE DIFFERENT MARITIME TOWNS

OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, As relates to their Gross Amount of Tonnage, and the average Size and Number of

Ships belonging to each.

CAREFULLY EXTRACTED FROM THE

Parliamentary Return, No. 2, ordered to be printed by the House of Commons,

March 11th, 1828.

ENGLAND.

Average.

No.

Total Amount
Above Below

of
100 Tons. 100 Tons.

Tonnage.

PORTS.

1 2 3 4

1,829
793
532
525
248
363
176
158
133
122

172 210 199 169 127 145 164

76 148 164 72 87 57 89 103 121

1,699

135 217

81 328 140 103 405 149

51 263 209 334 130 81 31 226 218 243

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52

London
Newcastle
Liverpool
Sunderland
Hull
Whitehaven
Whitby
Yarmouth
Bristol
Scarborough
Dartmouth
Plymouth
Beaumaris
Exeter
Poole
Lynn
Cardigan
Gloucester
Rochester -
Bideford
Ipswich
Milford
Boston
Southampton
Portsmouth
Maldon
Bridlington
Weymouth
Falmouth
Faversham
Swansea
Colchester
Aberystwith
Stockton
Fowey
Lancaster
Harwich

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 .35 36 37

606,859
194,712
149,070
102,456
73,504
73,227
46,086
42,931
41,686
28,322
24,874
23,918
21,803
17,965
16,984
13,604
13,521
12,426
10,282
8.816
8,108
8,095
8,064
8,019
7,733
7,717
7,448
7,212
7,204
7,129
6,950
6,764
6,488
6,435
5,961
5,760
5,545

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112

91 141 163 146 190 19 64 51 189

87 248 114 30 74 39 83

54 42 90 63 67 54 45 46 39 155 78 92 35 63 27 54 97 72 113 61

36

12 12 8

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38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73

Cowes
Dover
St. Ives
Penzance
Berwick
Chester
Chepstow
Ramsgate
Rye
Ilfracombe
Newport
Padstow
Wells
Cardiff
Lyme
Llanelly
Blakeney and Clay
Preston
Arundel
Bridgewater
Southwold
Carlisle
Woodbridge
Chichester
Wisbeach
Aldborough
Barnstaple
Grimsby
Shoreham
Looe
Truro
Newhaven
Minehead
Scilly
Deal
Gweek

4 13

7. 18 18

8 16 18 9 8 12

3 11 14 13 3 9 8 15 5 4 3 5

143
99
77
76
36
65
44
56
62
55
39
69
54
26
26
68
41
37
12
40
33
35
28
55
38
40
41
48
26
24
23
15
18
19
17
10

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34 47 60 53 90 65 78 61 58 64 77 51 55 88 86 46 65 71 105 62 69 67 75 40 57 52 52 38 55 44 69 64 79 39 30 48

5,282 5,239 5,032 4,973 4,861 4,730 4,693 4,493 4,095 4,053 3,957 3,675 3.617 3,518 3,309 3,287 3,254 3,219 2,842 2,811 2,576 2,561 2,477 2,442 2,406 2,382 2,198 1,872 1,860 1,670 1,656 1,025

889 743 540 485

| ابي |

421

Total-England

5,940

8,552 1,752,400

SCOTLAND.

46,587 37,786 36,220 26,107 24,635 24,227 15,778 14,230 12,283 11,540

138

ܟܬ ܟ ܟ ܗ ܗ ܙ ܤܩܘ

Aberdeen
Greenock
Glasgow
Leith
Grangemouth
Dundee
Montrose
Irvine
Dumfries
Kirkaldy

202
105
111
95
83
105
64
60
17
46

134
320
113
162
127

99 106

77 158 58

89 162 102 117 119

93 104

70 111

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Those who delight to revel amongst the beauties of Nature, could not take a more delightful companion with them than this little volume. It is written, indeed, with the feelings of a poet more than of a dry specimen-collecting naturalist; for it may be truly said, that the Author gazes on Nature • with a poet's eye,' and writes his observations with a poet's pen. His very arrangement is poetical. He leads his readers first to the mountain,' and successively to the lake,' the river,' and the moor,' describing in each the various productions, animal, vegetable, and mineral. It is decidedly well wi and its being rather popular than profound, will form its chief recommendation to the class of readers for whom it is intended.

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