The Scottish Nation: Or, The Surnames, Families, Literature, Honours, and Biographical History of the People of Scotland

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A. Fullarton & Company, 1867 - Heraldry

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Page 510 - There was a strong expression of sense and shrewdness in all his lineaments ; the eye alone, I think, indicated the poetical character and temperament. It was large and of a dark cast, which glowed, I say literally glowed, when he spoke with feeling or interest. I never saw such another eye in a human head, though I have seen the most distinguished men of my time.
Page 266 - O how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of Heaven, O how canst thou renounce, and hope to be forgiven ? These charms shall work thy soul's eternal health, And love, and gentleness, and joy, impart.
Page 463 - The exercise which I commend first, is the exact use of their weapon, to guard, and to strike safely with edge or point ; this will keep them healthy, nimble, strong, and well in breath ; is also the likeliest means to make them grow large and tall, and to inspire them with a gallant and fearless courage...
Page 249 - These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.
Page 511 - Among the men who were the most learned of their time and country, he expressed himself with perfect firmness, but without the least intrusive forwardness ; and, when he differed in opinion, he did not hesitate to express it firmly, yet at the same time with modesty.
Page 324 - Strahan, however, had sent one of the sermons to Dr. Johnson for his opinion ; and after his unfavourable letter to Dr. Blair had been sent off, he received from Johnson on Christmaseve, a note in which was the following paragraph :
Page 493 - A Specimen of some Errors and Defects in the History of the Reformation of the Church of England ; by Anthony Harmer.
Page 13 - Were it permitted for a soldier to regret any one who has fallen in the service of his country, I might be excused for lamenting him, more than any other person; but it is some consolation to those who tenderly loved him, that as his life was honourable, so was his death glorious. His memory will be recorded in the annals of his country — will be sacred to every British soldier, and embalmed in the recollection of a grateful posterity.
Page 150 - Arbuthnot was a man of great comprehension, skilful in his profession, versed in the sciences, acquainted with ancient literature, and able to animate his mass of knowledge by a bright and active imagination; a scholar with great brilliance of wit, a wit who, in the crowd of life, retained and discovered a noble ardour of religious zeal.
Page 501 - I had pride before, but he taught it to flow in proper channels. His knowledge of the world was vastly superior to mine, and I was all attention to learn. He was the only man I ever saw who .was a greater fool than myself where woman was the presiding star; but he spoke of illicit love with the levity of a sailor, which hitherto I had regarded with horror. Here his friendship did me a mischief and the consequence was, that soon after I resumed the plough, I wrote the "Poet's Welcome".

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