The British Critic: A New Review, Volume 22

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F. and C. Rivington, 1803 - Theology
 

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Page 679 - Him that overcometh will I make a pillar in the temple of my God , and he shall go no more out: and I will write upon him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, which is new Jerusalem, which cometh down out of heaven from my God : and I will write upon him my new name.
Page 623 - ... no more the likeness of something existing without us, than the names that stand for them are the likeness of our ideas, which yet upon hearing they are apt to excite in us.
Page 623 - If any one asks me what this solidity is? I send him to his senses to inform him : let him put a flint or a foot-ball between his hands, and then endeavour to join them, and he will know.
Page 622 - I think it lies chiefly in having called in question the common theory of ideas or images of things in the mind being the only objects of thought; a theory founded on natural prejudices, and so universally received as to be interwoven with the structure of language.
Page 26 - That we being delivered out of the hand of our enemies : might ferve Him without fear ; In holinefs and righteoufnefs before Him : all the days of our life.
Page 23 - ... all at once as if it would overflow its channel, the waves passed over our heads, and we felt the bottom heave up under our feet: our clothes were conveyed away along with the shore itself, which seemed to be carried off by the whirlwind which had now reached us. We were compelled to leave the water, and our wet and naked bodies being beat upon by a...
Page 623 - To discover the nature of our ideas the better, and to discourse of them intelligibly, it will be convenient to distinguish them, as they are ideas or perceptions in our minds, and as they are modifications of matter in the bodies that cause such perceptions in us; that so we may not think (as perhaps usually is done) that they are exactly the images and resemblances of something inherent in the subject: most of those of sensation being in the mind no more the likeness of something existing without...
Page 31 - Wherefore the grant of repentance is not to be denied to fuch as fall into fin after Baptifm. After we have received the Holy Ghoft we may depart from grace given, and fall into fin, and by the grace of God (we may) arife again, and amend our lives.
Page 378 - Scaliger compares to the labours of the anvil and the mine ; that what is obvious is not always known, and what is known is not always present ; that sudden fits of inadvertency will surprise vigilance, slight avocations will seduce attention, and casual eclipses of the mind will darken learning; and that the writer shall often in vain trace his memory at the moment of need for that which yesterday he knew with intuitive readiness...
Page 34 - This is My Body which is given for you ; this is My Blood which is shed for you...

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