The Cyclopędia of Wit and Humor: Containing Choice and Characteristic Selections from the Writings of the Most Eminent Humorists of America, Ireland, Scotland, and England ...

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Page ix - ... for wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety, wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy; judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully, one from another, ideas, wherein can be found the least difference, thereby to avoid being misled by similitude, and by affinity to take one thing for another.
Page vii - ... expression ; sometimes it lurketh under an odd similitude; sometimes it is lodged in a sly question, in a smart answer, in a quirkish reason, in a shrewd intimation, in cunningly diverting or cleverly retorting an objection : sometimes it is couched in a bold scheme of speech, in a tart irony, in a lusty hyperbole, in a startling metaphor, in a plausible reconciling of contradictions, or in acute nonsense: sometimes a scenical representation of persons or things, a counterfeit speech, a mimical...
Page 70 - But neither breath of morn when she ascends With charm of earliest birds ; nor rising sun On this delightful land ; nor herb, fruit, flower, Glistering with dew; nor fragrance after showers; Nor grateful evening mild ; nor silent night With this her solemn bird ; nor walk by moon, Or glittering starlight, without thee is sweet.
Page 94 - As if increase of appetite had grown By what it fed on; and yet, within a month, Let me not think on't: Frailty, thy name is woman!
Page 14 - Sense her dictates wrote, Fair Virtue put a seal, or Vice a blot. The thought was happy, pertinent, and true ; Methinks a genius might the plan pursue. I — can you pardon my presumption ? — I, No wit, no genius, yet for once will try. Various the papers various wants produce — The wants of fashion, elegance, and use; Men are as various ; and, if right I scan, Each sort of paper represents some man.
Page viii - ... knows not what, and springeth up one can hardly tell how. Its ways are unaccountable and inexplicable, being answerable to the numberless rovings of fancy and windings of language. It is, in short, a manner of speaking out of the simple and plain way — such as reason teacheth and proveth things by — which by a pretty surprising uncouthness in conceit or expression doth affect and amuse the fancy, stirring in it some wonder, and breeding some delight thereto.
Page 6 - The soldier flew, the sailor too, And scared almost to death, sir, Wore out their shoes, to spread the news, And ran till out of breath, sir. Now up and down throughout the town, Most frantic scenes were acted ; And some ran here, and others there, Like men almost distracted. Some fire cry'd, which some denied, But said the earth had quaked ; And girls and boys, with hideous noise, Ran thro
Page 191 - The fight's made up, and let's go at it. my soul if I don't jump down his throat, and gallop every chitterling out of him before you can say 'quit'!
Page 49 - Derby. A wet Sunday in a country inn ! whoever has had the luck to experience one can alone judge of my situation. The rain pattered against the casements ; the bells tolled for church with a melancholy sound. I went to the windows in quest of something to amuse the eye ; but it seemed as if I had been placed completely out of the reach of all amusement. The windows of my bed-room looked out among tiled roofs and stacks of chimneys, while those of my sitting-room commanded a full view of the stable-yard....
Page 20 - tis welcome still to me, But most, my Hasty Pudding, most in thee. Let the green succotash with thee contend; Let beans and corn their sweetest juices blend; Let butter drench them in its yellow tide, And a long slice of bacon grace their side; Not all the plate, how famed soe'er it be, Can please my palate like a bowl of thee.

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