The Columbiad: A Poem, Volume 2

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C. and A. Conrad and Company Philadelphia; Conrad, Lucas and Company Baltimore. Fry and Kammerer, Printers., 1809 - America
 

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Page 2 - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 164 - Beneath the footstool all destructive things, The mask of priesthood and the mace of kings, Lie trampled in the dust; for here at last Fraud, folly, error all their emblems cast. Each envoy here unloads his wearied hand Of some old idol from his native land; One flings a pagod on the mingled heap, One lays a crescent, one a cross to sleep; Swords, sceptres, mitres, crowns and globes and stars, Codes of false fame and stimulants to wars Sink in the settling mass; since guile began, These are the agents...
Page 76 - And conquer'd freedom for the grateful world. And you, their peers, whose steel avenged their blood, Whose breasts with theirs our sacred rampart stood, Illustrious relics of a thousand fields! To you at last the foe reluctant yields. But tho the Muse, too prodigal of praise, Dares with the dead your living worth to raise, Think not, my friends, the patriot's task is done, Or Freedom safe, because the battle's won.
Page 100 - Each science opening in his ample mind, His fancy glowing and his taste refined. See Trumbull lead the train. His skilful hand Hurls the keen darts of satire round the land. Pride, knavery, dulness feel his mortal stings, And listening virtue triumphs while he sings; Britain's foil'd sons, victorious now no more, In guilt retiring from the wasted shore, Strive their curst cruelties te hide in Vain; The world resounds them in his deathless strain.
Page 165 - Or the deep trumpet's solemn voice resound, Long rows of reverend sires sublime extend, And cares of worlds on every brow suspend. High in the front, for soundest wisdom known, A sire elect in peerless grandeur shone...
Page 164 - Here in his porch earth's figured Genius stands, Truth's mighty mirror poising in his hands. Graved on the pedestal and chased in gold, Man's noblest arts their symbol forms unfold:— His tillage and his trade, with all the store Of wondrous fabrics and of useful lore; Labors that fashion to his sovereign sway Earth's total powers, her soil and air and sea, Force them to yield their fruits at his known call, And bear his mandates round the rolling ball...
Page 12 - Whose air consolidates and cuts and stings, And shakes hoar tinsel from its flickering wings. Earth heaves and cracks beneath the alighting god; He gains the pass, bestrides the roaring flood, Shoots from his nostrils one wide withering sheet Of treasured meteors on the struggling fleet; The waves conglaciate instant, fix in air, Stand like a ridge of rocks, and shiver there.
Page 94 - Launcht on the deep o'er every wave they fly, Feed tropic isles and Europe's looms supply. To nurse the arts and fashion freedom's lore Young schools of science rise along the shore; Great without pomp their modest walls expand, Harvard and Yale and Princeton grace the land, Penn's student halls his youths with gladness greet, On James's bank Virginian Muses meet, Manhattan's mart collegiate domes command, Bosom'd in groves, see growing Dartmouth stand; Bright o'er its realm reflecting solar fires,...
Page 81 - Atlas, throned sublime, Great brother guardian of old Afric's clime; High o'er his coast he rears his frowning form, O'erlooks and calms his sky-borne fields of storm, Flings off the clouds that round his shoulders hung And breaks from clogs of ice his trembling tongue; While far thro...
Page 102 - His country's wrongs, her duties, dangers, praise, Fire his full soul and animate his lays: Wisdom and War with equal joy shall own So fond a votary and so brave a son.

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