The nut-brown maids; or, The first hosier and his hosen [by H. Keddie].

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Page 205 - And drink to your hearts' desiring. With the last year's brand Light the new block, and For good success in his spending On your psaltries play, That sweet luck may Come while the log is a-teending.
Page 395 - Rich windows that exclude the light, And passages that lead to nothing. . Full oft within the spacious walls, When he had fifty winters o'er him, My grave Lord-Keeper led the brawls ; The seals and maces danced before him. His bushy beard, and shoe-strings green, His high-crown'd hat, and satin doublet, Moved the stout heart of England's queen, Though Pope and Spaniard could not trouble it.
Page 337 - She took me by the hand and wrung it hard, and said, "No, Robin, I am not well." And then discoursed with me of her indisposition, and that her heart had been sad and heavy for ten or twelve days; and in her discourse she fetched not so few as forty or fifty great sighs. I was grieved at the first to see her in this plight, for in all my lifetime before I never knew her fetch a sigh, but when the Queen of Scots was beheaded.
Page 55 - After dinner you may appear again, having translated yourself out of your English cloth cloak into a light Turkey grogram, if you have that happiness of shifting ; and then be seen, for a turn or two, to correct your teeth with some quill or silver instrument, and to cleanse your gums with a wrought handkerchief...
Page 76 - WHEN it shall please God to bring thee to man's estate, use great providence and circumspection in choosing thy wife; for from thence will spring all thy future good or evil; and it is an action of life, like unto a stratagem of war, wherein a man can err but once.
Page 120 - That ye be kind and true; Of maid, and wife, in all my life, The best that ever I knew. Be merry and glad, be no more sad, The case is changed new; For it were ruth that for your truth Ye should have cause to rue. Be not dismayed: whatsoever I said To you when I began, I will not to the green-wood go; I am no banished man.
Page 237 - Here landeth as true a subject, being a prisoner, as ever landed at these stairs ; and before thee, O God! I speak it, having no other friends but thee alone.
Page 120 - HE Ye shall not nede further to drede; I will not disparage You, (God defend!) sith ye descend Of so great a lineage. Now understand; to Westmoreland, Which is mine heritage, I will you bring; and with a ring, By way of marriage I will you take, and lady make, As shortly as I can: Thus have you won an erly's son, And not a banished man.
Page 118 - For if ye, as ye said, Be so unkind to leave behind Your love, the Nut-brown Maid, Trust me truly, that I shall die, Soon after ye be gone; For in my mind, of all mankind I love but you alone.
Page 297 - Your greatest students are commonly no better, silly, soft fellows in their outward behaviour, absurd, ridiculous to others, and no whit experienced in worldly business; they can measure the heavens, range over the world, teach others wisdom, and yet in bargains and contracts they are circumvented by every base tradesman. Are not these men fools? and how should they be otherwise? "but as so many sots in schools, when (as he [Petronius] well observed), they neither hear nor see such things as are...

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