Fair Trial Rights of the Accused: A Documentary History

Front Cover
Ronald A. Banaszak
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002 - Law - 216 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified


Use this collection of over 60 primary documents to trace the evolution of trial rights from English and colonial beginnings to our contemporary understanding of their meaning. Court cases and other documents bring to life the controversies that have historically surrounded the rights of those who have been accused in the American legal system. Explanatory introductions to documents aid users in understanding the various arguments put forth and the context in which the document was written, while illuminating the significance of each document.

Students will be able to trace how the expansion of trial rights is directly correlated to historical events and social concerns. Documents are arranged chronologically to provide readers with a clear view of the long convoluted history of these rights in our country and to clearly illustrate how trial rights have grown over time to provide more protection for a growing number of individuals. A general introduction to the volume further explores the history of the concept of trial rights to provide a complete reference resource to complicated issues.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

IV
1
V
3
VI
6
VII
11
VIII
15
IX
19
X
23
XI
25
XXXIX
111
XL
119
XLI
122
XLII
124
XLIII
126
XLIV
129
XLV
132
XLVI
134

XII
28
XIII
31
XIV
34
XV
37
XVI
40
XVII
43
XIX
46
XX
49
XXI
52
XXII
56
XXIII
60
XXIV
63
XXVI
66
XXVII
68
XXVIII
70
XXIX
74
XXX
77
XXXI
82
XXXII
86
XXXIII
89
XXXIV
93
XXXV
97
XXXVI
101
XXXVII
106
XXXVIII
109
XLVII
138
XLVIII
141
XLIX
143
L
149
LI
157
LII
158
LIII
160
LIV
164
LV
166
LVI
169
LVII
172
LVIII
175
LIX
178
LX
181
LXI
184
LXII
187
LXIII
191
LXIV
196
LXV
199
LXVI
203
LXVII
206
LXVIII
208
LXIX
211
LXX
213
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 42 - There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory otherwise than in the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted; Provided, always, That any person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor or service as aforesaid.
Page 38 - And every denomination of Christians, demeaning themselves peaceably, and as good subjects of the commonwealth, shall be equally under the protection of the law: and no subordination of any one sect or denomination to another shall ever be established by law.
Page 38 - We, therefore, the people of Massachusetts, acknowledging, with grateful hearts, the goodness of the great Legislator of the universe, in affording us, in the course of his providence, an opportunity, deliberately and peaceably, without fraud, violence or surprise, of entering into an original, explicit and solemn compact with each other...
Page 9 - Highness the Prince of Orange will perfect the deliverance so far advanced by him, and will still preserve them from the violation of their rights which they have here asserted, and from all other attempts upon their religion, rights and liberties: II.
Page 39 - And no subject shall be arrested, imprisoned, despoiled, or deprived of his property, immunities, or privileges, put out of the protection of the law, exiled, or deprived of his life, liberty, or estate; but by the judgment of his peers, or the law of the land.
Page 6 - All which they most humbly pray of Your most excellent Majesty, as their rights and liberties according to the laws and statutes of this realm ; and that Your Majesty would also vouchsafe to declare that the awards, doings and proceedings to the prejudice of your people in any of the...
Page 9 - And thereupon the said lords spiritual and temporal, and commons, pursuant to their respective letters and elections, being now assembled in a full and free representative of this nation, taking into their most serious consideration the best means for attaining the ends aforesaid; do in the first place (as their ancestors in like case have usually done) for the vindicating and asserting their ancient rights and liberties, declare; 1.
Page 8 - January in this year one thousand six hundred eighty and eight, in order to such an establishment as that their religion, laws and liberties might not again be in danger of being subverted; upon which letters elections having been accordingly made, And thereupon the said lords spiritual and temporal and commons pursuant...
Page 10 - And whereas it hath been found by experience that it is inconsistent with the safety and welfare of this Protestant kingdom to be governed by a popish prince...
Page 4 - Humbly show unto our Sovereign Lord the King, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons in Parliament assembled, that whereas it is declared and enacted by a statute made in the time of the reign of King Edward the First, commonly called, Statutum de Tallagio non concedendo...

References to this book

About the author (2002)

RONALD BANASZAK, SR., is Associate Professor in the School of Education at Aurora University, Illinois./e

Bibliographic information