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OTHER WORKS BY JAMES SULLY.

OUTLINES OF PSYCHOLOGY, with Special Refer

ence to the Theory of Education. A Text-Book for

Colleges. Crown 8vo. Cloth, $3.00.
TEACHER'S HAND-BOOK OF PSYCHOLOGY.

On the Basis of “Outlines of Psychology.” Abridged
by the author for the use of Teachers, Schools, Reading-
Circles, and Students generally.

L

445 pages. Cloth, $1.50. ILLUSIONS: A Psychological Study. 12mo. 372

pages. Cloth, $1.50. PESSIMISM: A History and a Criticism. Second

edition. 8vo. 470 pages and index. Cloth, $4.00.

I 2mo,

New York: D. APPLETON AND COMPANY, Publishers.

THE HUMAN MIND

A TEXT-BOOK OF PSYCHOLOGY

BY

JAMES SULLY, M. A., LL. D.

EXAMINER IN MENTAL AND MORAL SCIENCE IN THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON
AUTHOR OF OUTLINES OF PSYCHOLOGY, TEACHER'S HAND-BOOK OF PSYCHOLOGY

ILLUSIONS, PESSIMISM, ETC.

IN TWO VOLUMES

VOL. 1

NEW YORK
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY

1892

Authorized Edition.

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The present work is an expansion and further elaboration of the doctrine set forth in my Outlines of Psychology. Although the mode of arrangement and of treatment will in the main be found to be similar, the book may be described as a new and independent publication. It is specially intended for those who desire a fuller presentment of the latest results of psychological research than · was possible in a volume which aimed at being elementary and practical. Hence much more space has been given to the new developments of “physiological” and experimental psychology, to illustrations of psychological principles in the phenomena of racial and animal life, of insanity and hypnotism. At the same time, an effort has been made to illustrate the obscurity and debatableness of many of the problems of the science, and to aid the reader in arriving at a judicial conclusion on these points by historical references to the main diversities of doctrine. In this way it is hoped that the treatise will find its proper place beside the Outlines, the success of which would have made it a fatuity on my part to try to supplant it.

With respect to the fuller references to conditions to be found in the new work, a word of explanation may perhaps be needed.

In thus admitting the claims of the neurologist to be heard within the

nervous

psychological domain, I have no intention to repudiate my former conviction that nervous physiology will never usurp the place of psychology proper, as the science which has to disentangle and reduce to simplicity the web of consciousness. On the other hand, this larger admission of physiological matter may be taken to mean that I am far from the standpoint of that psychological asceticism, which, disowning the poor body altogether, seeks at this time of day to elaborate a theory of mindaction ab intra, and without any reference to the system of organic forces which is conditioning this action at every point.

Among many valuable recent contributions to the science, I would acknowledge my special indebtedness to the writings of Professor Wundt, Professor Ribot, Dr. Ward, Professor Ladd, Dr. Münsterberg, and Professor W. James, to all of which nunierous references will be found in the course of my exposition. To the full, vital, and eminently modern Principles of Psychology of W. James I wish more particularly to tender warm acknowledgments.

I would also acknowledge my personal obligations to my friend Dr. W. C. Coupland, who has generously assisted me by reading through the sheets of my work. But for his fine critical judgment and his kindly solicitude the blemishes of my workmanship would be far more numerous than they are.

HAMPSTEAD,

December, 1891.

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