A Literary Manual of Foreign Quotations, Ancient and Modern: With Illustrations from American and English Authors and Explanatory Notes

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1890 - Quotations - 249 pages
 

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Page 220 - Vivamus, mea Lesbia, atque amemus, rumoresque senum severiorum omnes unius aestimemus assis. soles occidere et redire possunt: nobis, cum semel occidit brevis lux, nox est perpetua una dormienda.
Page v - Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man; and, therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend...
Page 69 - O eloquent, just, and mighty Death \ whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded ; what none hath dared, thou hast done ; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised ; thou hast drawn together all the far-stretched greatness, all the pride, cruelty, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hie jacet...
Page 109 - Spiritus intus alit: totamque infusa per artus ' Mens agitat molem, et magno se corpore miscet ' Inde hominum pecudumque genus vitaeque volantum ' Et quae marmoreo fert monstra sub aequore pontus.
Page 152 - quia tanti quantum habeas sis' : quid facias illi? iubeas miserum esse, libenter quatenus id facit: ut quidam memoratur Athenis sordidus ac dives, populi contemnere voces 65 sic solitus : 'populus me sibilat, at mihi plaudo ipse domi, simul ac nummos contemplor in arca.
Page 136 - He sought the storms; but, for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands, to boast his wit. Great wits are sure to madness near allied, And thin partitions do their bounds divide; Else, why should he, with wealth and honour blest, Refuse his age the needful hours of rest?
Page 103 - But little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company, and faces are but a gallery of pictures, and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love.
Page 148 - He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper. This amicable conflict with difficulty obliges us to an intimate acquaintance with our object, and compels us to consider it in all its relations. It will not suffer us to be superficial.
Page 27 - Another scene was opened, and other actors appeared on the stage. The State, in the condition I have described it, was delivered into the hands of Lord Chatham — a great and celebrated name ; a name that keeps the name of this country respectable in every other on the globe.
Page 233 - Säulen ruht sein Dach, Es glänzt der Saal, es schimmert das Gemach, Und Marmorbilder stehn und sehn mich an: Was hat man dir, du armes Kind getan? Kennst du es wohl? Dahin! Dahin Möcht' ich mit dir, o mein Beschützer, ziehn!

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