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From John M. CARNOCHAN, Esq., M.D., Professor of Surgery; Surgeon-inChief to the Emigrants' Hospital, Ward's Island.

45 LAFAYETTE PLACE, Feb. 17, 1859. MY DEAR SIR-I am much obliged to you for your several articles elucidating the phenomena of various functions and manifestations of some portions of the nervous system.

I have read them with much gratification, and believe you have struck upon a theme replete with much important matter, and from the study and analysis of which many useful revelations are to spring.

I have long thought that medicine has to gain its claim as an exact science through such studies as those with a résumé of which you have been so kind as to furnish me.

I am, dear sir, very respectfully yours, Dr. JOHN O'REILLY.

J. M. CARNOCHAN.

Extract of a Letter from FORDYCE BARKER, Esq., M.D., Ex-Professor of the

Practice of Midwifery, &c. MY DEAR DR. O'REILLY-I have read your papers on the source of Puerperal Hæmorrhage and on the Connection of the Nervous Centres of Animal and Organic Life with great pleasure and profit. I congratulate you on your successful study of important pathological questions on a physiological basis, and I hope your contributions will stimulate a new spirit of inquiry.

Extract of a Letter from SAMUEL R. PERCY, Esq., M.D., Professor of Materia

Medica, Therapeutics, and Medical Jurisprudence, in the New York Medical College and Charity Hospital.

NEW YORK, March 4, 1861. MY DEAR SIR—I have read with inexpressible interest your last monograph, and especially that part of it relating to the action of medicines on the organic nervous system. Owing to various circumstances, both necessity and choice have led me to study Materia Medica, and I have often been compelled to acknowledge that many of the unsuccessful results of practice have been owing to a want of correct knowledge of the therapeutic action of medicines. Your monograph to some extent supplies this deficiency, and explains to us the modus operandi of many remedial agents. No thoughtful physician can read your remarks without instruction; for if there may be points which are not in perfect accordance with his own experience, they open to him a vein of study which he can follow with much profit.

nal Fibres by which it is formed." showing the Connections of the Internal Convolution, and the Band of Longitudicopied, exhibiting the “Internal Surface of the Left Hemisphere of the Brain, lamented Dr. R. B. Todd, for the beautiful Engraving from which the above is

I am indebted to my countryman, the late highly-distinguished and deeply

“C, C, Corpus Callosum. 0, 0, 0, Internal Convolution. 6, Septum Lucidum. a, Anterior Commissure. f, Fornix. C, Superior Layer of
the Crus Cerebri. d, Iuferior Layer of the same, separated from the former by the Locus Niger.”

“ The fibres of the Internal Convolution are seen in the middle lobe, extending to the Hippocampus Major.”

The nerve-fibres or tubules of the brain are remarkably well shown, and particular attention is directed to them on page 80, with a view of understanding their use.

[graphic]

THE PLACENTA,

THE

ORGANIC NERVOUS SYSTEM,

THE BLOOD,
THE OXYGEN,

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LICENTIATE AND FELLOW OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEOXS IN IRELAND ;
RESIDENT FELLOW OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE ; MEMBER
OF THIE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE OF NEW YORK; LATE
MEDICAL OFFICER TO THE OLDCASTLE WORKIIOUSE AND

FEVER HOSPITAL, IRELAND.

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S. S. & W. WOOD, 389 BROADWAY.

LONDON:
JOHN CHURCHILL, NEW BURLINGTON STREET.

1861.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861,

By JOHN O'REILLY, M.D., In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern

District of New York.

Printed by Hall, CLAYTON & MEDOLE,

46 Pine Street, New York.

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