Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

HENRY MANDEVILLE, D.D.,
PROFESSOR OF MORAL SCIENCE AND BELLES-LETTRES IN HAMILTON

COLLEGE NEW YORK.

NEW EDITION, REVISED AND CORRECTED,

NEW-YORK:
D. APPLETON & CO., 346 & 348 BROADWAY

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors]

Entered according to Act of Congress, in tbe ytt 1>«

By D. APPLETON & COMPANY,

te the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for tho Southern District of New York.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1850,

By D. APPLETON &. COMPANY,

En the Clerk's Office of the District Court o be United States for the Southern District of New York.

ADDITIONAL HINTS FOK TEACHERS.

The present volume differs from Part 3. of the Introduction in two respects.

I. It contains some selections from poetry: inserted rather in accordance with the views of others, than in consequence of any change of my own, expressed in Part III.: it heing still my opinion, deliberately formed after much experience and observation, that poetry is the worst imaginable reading to form a flexible and graceful delivery. Its tendency to a monotonous manner is so strong, that even a practised reader, unless continually on his guard, will insensibly yield to its influence and glide into song. Nor is this all: it is an additional objection to the introduction of poetry into our primary school-books, that it comprises, especially poetry of the higher grade, such as compilers are usually most anxious to insert in tnese books, the most difficult reading to be found in the whole circle of English literature. It is at once passionate and figurative: demanding, on the one hand, to give its ever-varying emotions due utterance, much power and versatility of expression, and, on the other, to render its ideas intelligible, a profound knowledge not merely of the primary and fundamental, but the derivative meaning of words; with the sources also and the fitness of the imagery; and in short with all those verbal artifices on which so much of the elevation and beauty of popular poetry depends. Have the pupils in the common schools this perception and command of the passions, the last and highest attainment of oratory; this extensive and intimate acquaintance with language, the fruit of long and assiduous culture? If not, such reading is manifestly beyond their depth, and should be deferred to a more advanced period of their education; when they may have measurably formed their habits of de livery, and be able to bring to the exercise somewhat more of information and maturity of judgment.

Impressed by the importance of these considerations, I earnestly recommend to teachers, the propriety of passing the poetical selections, I have made, by, until their class or classes shall have read the book through at least a half a dozen times; and should they not allow them to be read at all, I shall have the higher opinion of their capacity as teachers. This, however, as they may choose.

II. Instead of subjoining to each section, as in Part 3., definitions of a few of the more difficult words in it, I have, in the main, contented myself with a quotation of those words which in my judgment required definition: here and there only, inserting an equivalent after a word to be defined, and more frequently as well as more fully explaining examples of idiomatic usage. I have adopted this plan,

1. Because the process of definition, if entered UDon at all, should be extended to every word. Words rarely occurring may need ex

!•

« PreviousContinue »