The Boston Spectator: Devoted to Politicks and Belles-lettres, Volume 1

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Munroe, Francis and Parker, 1814 - United States
 

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Page 36 - May the great God, whom I worship, grant to my country, and for the benefit of Europe in general, a great and glorious victory, and may no misconduct in any one tarnish it; and may humanity after victory be the predominant feature in the British fleet! For myself individually, I commit my life to Him that made me; and may His blessing alight on my endeavours for serving my country faithfully!
Page 34 - The West derives from the East supplies requisite to its growth and comfort, and what is perhaps of still greater consequence, it must of necessity owe the secure enjoyment of indispensable outlets for its own productions to the weight, influence, and the future maritime strength of the Atlantic side of the Union, directed by an indissoluble community of interest as one nation.
Page 32 - ... with all his heart, and with all his soul, and with all his strength; and, therefore, they loved him as truly as and as fervently as he loved England.
Page 214 - ... valid than they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact, and that in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers not granted by the said compact, the !States who are parties thereto have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose...
Page 44 - ... again taking the hand of his dying friend and commander, congratulated him on having gained a complete victory. How many of the enemy were taken he did not know, as it was impossible to perceive them distinctly, but fourteen or fifteen at least. " That's well," cried Nelson,
Page 44 - Kiss me, Hardy,' said he. Hardy knelt down and kissed his cheek, and Nelson said : ' Now I am satisfied. Thank God, I have done my duty ! ' Hardy stood over him in silence for a moment or two, then knelt again, and kissed his forehead. 'Who is that?' said Nelson ; and being informed, he replied, ' God bless you, Hardy ! ' and Hardy then left him for ever.
Page 96 - Salamis ! Their azure arches through the long expanse More deeply purpled meet his mellowing glance, And tenderest tints, along their summits driven, Mark his gay course, and own the hues of heaven ; Till, darkly shaded from the land and deep, Behind his Delphian cliff he sinks to sleep.
Page 88 - For him, the spring Distils her dews, and from the silken gem Its lucid leaves unfolds : for him, the hand Of Autumn tinges every fertile branch With blooming gold, and blushes like the morn.
Page 44 - I have called two or three of our fresh ships round, and have no doubt of giving them a drubbing." " I hope," said Nelson, " none of our ships have struck." Hardy answered,
Page 44 - ... perceived, upon examination, that the wound was mortal. This, however, was concealed from all except Captain Hardy, the chaplain, and the medical attendants. He himself being certain, from the sensation, in his back and the gush of blood he felt momently within his breast, that no human care could avail him, insisted that the surgeon should leave him, and attend to those to whom he might be useful. " For," said he,

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