A Later Pepys: The Correspondence of Sir William Weller Pepys, Bart., Master in Chancery 1758-1825, Volume 1

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Page 131 - True wit is nature to advantage dress'd ; What oft was thought, but ne'er so well express'd ; Something, whose truth convinc'd at sight we find, That gives us back the image of our mind.
Page 115 - When they were first published, they were kindly commended by the Critical Reviewers ; and poor Lyttelton, with humble gratitude, returned, in a note which I have read, acknowledgments which can never be proper, since they must be paid either for flattery or for justice.
Page 204 - Madam, I am now become a convert to your way of thinking. I am convinced that all mankind are upon an equal footing ; and to give you an unquestionable proof...
Page 72 - you shall be my confessor : when I first set out in the world, I had friends who endeavoured to shake my belief in the Christian religion. I saw difficulties which staggered me ; but I kept my mind open to conviction. The evidences and doctrines of Christianity, studied with attention, made me a most firm and persuaded believer of the Christian religion. I have made it the rule of my life, and it is the ground of my future hopes. I have erred and sinned; but have repented, and never indulged any...
Page 169 - tis to write in verse His eulogies, which most men's mouths rehearse. His virtues and his pills are so well known That envy can't confine them under stone. But they'll survive his dust and not expire Till all things else at th
Page 185 - For honour travels in a strait so narrow, Where one but goes abreast: keep then the path; For emulation hath a thousand sons, That one by one pursue: If you give way, Or hedge aside from the direct forthright, Like to an enter'd tide, they all rush by, And leave you hindmost...
Page 161 - We are not here to sell a parcel of boilers and vats, but the potentiality of growing rich beyond the dreams of avarice.
Page 88 - Mr. Cumberland assures me, that he was always treated with great courtesy by Dr. Johnson, who, in his Letters to Mrs. Thrale, vol. ii. p. 68 thus speaks of that learned, ingenious, and accomplished gentleman: The want of company is an inconvenience: but Mr. Cumberland is a million.
Page 66 - Her speech was the melodious voice of Love, Her song the warbling of the vernal grove ; Her eloquence was sweeter than her song, Soft as her heart, and as her reason strong...
Page 182 - Whoever wishes to attain an English style, familiar but not coarse, and elegant but not ostentatious...

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