The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity from Antiquity to the Present

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Fontana Press, 1999 - Medicine - 833 pages
29 Reviews
Set to become the standard work on the history of medicine, this book is also a treasure trove of historical surprises. Roy Porter shows how lemons did as much as Nelson to defeat Napoleon and how African slaves became immune to malaria.

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Review: The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity

User Review  - Nathan Douthit - Goodreads

Not the most compelling, reads a bit like a textbook. Also, the author is pretty pessimistic about the advances of medicine, and I felt like the last two chapters contained quite a bit of editorializing. Overall, an interesting read. Read full review

Review: The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity

User Review  - Wyndy - Goodreads

This is an upper division/ graduate level read. If you are lazy or not truly interested in the history of medicine, don't bother. As medical sociology faculty at Georgia State, I require this book of my students. It's worth your time. Read full review

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About the author (1999)

Roy Porter is Professor of the Social History of Medicine at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine. He is the editor of the Fontana History of Science series, and the author of over sixty-five books, including the acclaimed bestseller 'London: A Social History'. His book on the history of madness in England, 'Mind Forg'd Manacles', won the Leo Gershoy Prize.

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