The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity from Antiquity to the Present

Front Cover
Fontana Press, 1999 - Medicine - 833 pages
13 Reviews
Set to become the standard work on the history of medicine, this book is also a treasure trove of historical surprises. Roy Porter shows how lemons did as much as Nelson to defeat Napoleon and how African slaves became immune to malaria.

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Review: The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity

User Review  - Joseph Boquiren - Goodreads

Plainly written for the layperson yet dense and multilyared. What was especially interesting for me was how Islamic medical practice advanced the knowledge of medical science in the West. Read full review

Review: The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity

User Review  - Andrew - Goodreads

A compelling perspective on the history of medicine from pre-Antiquity to (almost) the present day. It really brought home to me how rapid the rise of medicine has been over the past 60-70 years and ... Read full review

About the author (1999)

Roy Porter is Professor of the Social History of Medicine at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine. He is the editor of the Fontana History of Science series, and the author of over sixty-five books, including the acclaimed bestseller 'London: A Social History'. His book on the history of madness in England, 'Mind Forg'd Manacles', won the Leo Gershoy Prize.

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