Page images
PDF
EPUB

therefore, Mæcenas lived he was second, after his death first, in the confidence of Augustus and Tiberius, and he shared in the knowledge of the murder of Agrippa Posthumus. Later in life, he retained the form rather than the reality of the favor of his prince. This had happened to Mæcenas also. Such seems ever the fate of power. Rarely it lasts a lifetime,- perhaps because satiety seizes the giver or the receiver : the giver, when he has no more to bestow; the receiver, when he has nothing more to ask.

Ch. 31. The fourth consulship of Tiberius and the second of Drusus followed, memorable for the spectacle of father and son bearing office as colleagues. Germanicus, two years before, bad stood in the same relation of honor; but was less a cause of joy to the Prince, and less endeared by ties of blood. In the commencement of the same year Tiberius, assigning for the cause the restoration of his health, went into Campania, - perhaps for the purpose of tasting beforehand and by gradual experience a long and permanent removal from Rome; perhaps to permit Drusus, in the absence of his father, to perform the duties of the consulship alone. In his absence a trivial matter, swelling to a serious difficulty, afforded to the young consul an accidental means of acquiring popular favor. Domitius Corbuso, formerly prætor, complained to the senate of Lucius Sylla, a noble youth, that, at the spectacle of gladiators, he had not yielded him precedence of place.

INDEX.

ABBOTT, ALFRED A., Letter to, i. 244. British Poets of the 19th Century, Lecture
ADAMS, John, i. 460. -As “Novanglus,” on the, i. 203.
ii. 84.

BUCHANAN, JAMES, Letter from, i. 249.
ADAMS, John Q., i. 409.

His Speech respecting the Steamer
ADAMS, Rev. Dr. N., i. 237, 314.

Caroline, ii. 13.-On the Oregon Ques-
ADAMS, FAIRCHILD V., Case of, i. 167. tion, 127.
Address, removal of Judges by, ii. 346. Burke, EDMUND, ii. 84, 413.
Causes for, 361.

Bush, Rev. GEORGE, Letters to, i. 36,
Agawam, the Indian name of Ipswich, 37, 39, 73.

i. 347.
Agriculture develops the Spirit of Lib. CÆSAR, Julius, i. 456.
erty, ii. 217.

Calhoun, John C., ii. 215, 243.
AgreSSEAU, D', i. 415.

Caroline, The Steamer, ii. 5, 21, 55, 62.
ALGER, Rev. W. R., i. 290.

Cases, Meaning of the Word, ii. 36-39.
American Indians, i. 336. — History, He- CHATHAM, LORD, ii. 83.

roic Age of, 371. Bar, Functions of, Cherokees, Mission to the, i. 38.
416. - Theory of Government, 432. - CHOATE, David, Father of Rufus Choate,
Eloquence, 460. — Historical Events, i. 2.
Webster associated with, 486. – Na- Choate, David, Brother of Rufus, his
tional Growth, 503. - “ Museum,” Account of Rufus's Boyhood, i. 3.
upon Protection, ii. 90, 91. — Feeling Choate, Miriam, Mother of Rufus, i.
toward England, 170-172. — After the 2.
War of 1812, 219. - Nationality, Ora- CHOATE, Rufus. His Birth, i. 1. — An-
tion upon, 415, 418. — People, Unity cestry and Boyhood, 3. — College Life,
of, 418.

7. – Choice of a Profession, 11. — Is
AndroS, SIR EDMUND, i. 356.

Tutor at Dartmouth College, 16. –
ANTONY, i. 458.

Enters Law School at Cambridge, 15.
Ashburton Treaty, Webster's Negotiation Goes to Washington to study with
of, i. 526.

Mr. Wirt, 15. — Death of his Brother,
Athenian Democracy, i. 427, 435.

Washington Choate, 17. — Returns to
Augustus, i. 437.

Essex, 17. — Testimony of Mr. Wirt,

17. — Admission to the Bar, 18.
Baltimore, Whig Convention at, i. 174. Opens an Office in South Danvers, 18.
Banks, NATHANIEL P., ii. 399.

- Letter to Mr. Marsh, 18. — Mar-
Bar, American, Functions of, i. 416. riage, 19. — Removal to Salem, 24. -

- Its Conservative Influence, 417. The Essex Bar, 24. - Counsel in the
Its Liberal Tendencies, 418. Op Knapp Case, 26. — His Studies, 27,
posed to Radicalism, 428. — Its Share 31. – Letter to President Marsh, 29.
in forming the Constitution, 429.

- Nominated as Representative to
Bar of Essex, i. 24. – Meeting of the, Congress, 30. — Is elected, 31. — Let-
249.

ter to President James Marsh, 33.-
Bar of Suffolk, Meeting of the, i. 249. Enters Congress, 34. — Speeches on
Benton, Thomas H., His views upon Revolutionary Pensions and on the

Protection, ii. 178. — The Tariff of Tariff, 34, 35. — Letters to Dr. Andrew
1816, 229. His Tables unsatisfac Nichols, 35. — Letters to Professor
tory, 232, 233.

George Bush, 36, 37. — Georgia and
Bible, The, in Schools, i. 406.

the Missions to the Indians, 38. — Let-
Books, Limited Collections of, in Amer ter to Professor Bush, 39. Reëlected
ica, ii. 257.

to Congress, 40. — Speech on the Re-
Bright, Jesse D., Letter to, i. 104. moval of the Deposits, 40. — Resigns
BRINLEY, Mrs., Letter to, i. 108.

his Seat, 42. — Removes to Boston, 42.
VOL. II.

44

Lectures on the Waverley Novels and
on the Romance of the Sea, 42.-
Death of his youngest Child, 44.
His Professional Advancement, 46.
Letters to Richard I. Storrs, Jr., 47.
Chosen Senator in place of Mr. Web-
ster, 48. – Death of General Harrison,
48. Eulogy on General Harrison,
48. Speech on the McLeod Case, 49.

The Fiscal Bank Bill, 50. — Collis-
ion with Mr. Clay, 55. — Nomination
of Mr. Everett as Minister to England,
56. — Letter to Mr. Sumner, 57. –
Letters to his Son, 58. — Speech on
providing Remedial Justice in the
United States Courts, 59. — Letters
to Mr. Sumner and Mr. Hillard, 63.-
The North Eastern Boundary Ques-
tion, 63. – Journal, 65. — Address in
New York, 72. — Letter to Prof. Bush,
73. – Letters to Mr. Sumner, 74. –
Letter to his Daughters, 76. - Debate
on the Tariff, 77. -- Reply to Mr. Mc-
Duffie, 79. Congress Adjourned, 81.
- Journal, 84. Political Contest of
1844, 92. — Speaks for Mr. Clay, 92.
- Fragmentary Journal, 93. — Meet-
ing of Congress, 98. - Speech against
the Annexation of Texas, 98. — Ad-
mission of Iowa and Florida, 100.
Establishment of the Smithsonian In-
stitution, 101. — Library Plan, 102. —
Resignation of his position as Regent,
104. – Letter to Hon. Jesse D Bright,
104. – Letters to Hon. Charles W.
Upham, 106. -- Illness and Death of
Dr. Sewell, 108. - Letter to Mrs.
Francis Brinley, 108. — Address be-
fore the Law School in Cambridge,
109. Case of Rhode Island Bounda-
ry, 109. - Defence of Tirrell, 110.
The Smith Will Case, 117. - Speaks
in favor of General Taylor, 121. – Of-
fer of a Professorship in the Cam-
bridge Law School, 126. — Offer of a
Seat upon the Bench, 131. – Lecture
on the l'uritans, 131. — The Phillips'
Will Case, 184. — Fragmentary Jour-
nal, 136. — Change of Partnership,
139. Voyage to Europe, 139. —
Letters to Mrs. Choate, 139. — Jour-
nal, 143. Union Meetings, 162.
- Address on Washington, 163. -
The Case of Fairchild v. Adams,
167. Address before the Story
Association, 172. Webster Meet-
ing in Faneuil Hall, 173. — India-
Rubber Case Argued, 174. Balti-
more Convention, 174. — Address to
the Phi-Beta Kappa Society in Bur-
lington, Vt., 181. — Journey to Que-
bec, 183. - Death of Mr. Webster,

184. – Letter to E. Jackson, Esq., 184.

- Letter to Harvey Jewell, Esq., 185.
- Letters to Mrs. Eames, 185, 186,
189, 190, 194. – Offer of the Attorney
Generalship, 187. - Convention to re-
vise the Constitution of Massachu-
setts, 187. — Eulogy on Daniel Web-
ster at Dartmouth College, 187. -
Letter to Mr. Everett, 190. — Letters
to his Son, 191, 192, 193. – Letters to
his Daughter, 188, 191, 193. – Ad-
dress at the Dedication of the Peabody
Institute at Danvers, 194. – Letter to
Mr. Everett, 194. - Accident and Ill.
ness, 195. — Letter to Mr. Eames, 195.
- Letter to the Whig Convention at
Worcester, 199. — Speaks at Faneuil
Hall, 201. — Letter to Rev. Chandler
Robbins, 202. — Lecture on the Early
British Poets of this Century, 203. -
Letters to Mr. Everett, 203, 228.- Sir
Walter Scott, 205. — Letter to Hon.
Wm. M. Evarts, 211. - Political Cam-
paign of 1856, 211. —Deterinines to
support Mr. Buchanan, 211.- Letter
to the Whigs of Maine, 212. — Address
at Lowell, 217. - Letter to J. C.
Walsh, 219. - His Library, 221. -
Lecture on the Eloquence of Revolu-
tionary Periods, 222. Defence of
Mrs. Dalton, 222.–Oration before the
Boston Democratic Club, July 1858,
228. - Letter to Hon. George T. Da-
vis, 234. — Failing Health, 236.
Speech at the Webster Festival, 1859,
237. – Address at the Essex Street
Church, 237.-His last Law Case, 241.
- Goes to Dorchester, 243. – Decides
to go to Europe, 244. — Letter to Hon.
Charles Eames, 244. — Letter to Hon.
A. A. Abbott, 244. — Embarks for Eu-

- Illness on Board, 245. —
Lands at Halifax, 246. Letter from
Hon. George S. Hillard, 245.- Sudden
Death, 248. Proceedings of Public
Bodies at Halifax, 248. -Meeting of
the Essex and Suffolk Bars, 249,-
Speeches of Hon. C. G. Loring, R. H.
Dana, Jr., Judge Curtis, and Judge
Sprague, 250. — Meeting in Faneuil
Hall, 264. — Letter from Hon. J. H.
Clifford, 273. – Habits in his Office,
275.- Method of Preparation of Cases,
279. — Manner of Legal Study, 278.-
Intercourse with the younger Mem-
bers of the Bar, 281. - Manner to the
Court, 282. — Charges and Income,
283. – Manner to the Jury, 285. -
Vocabulary, 286. — Wit and Humor,
287. — Conversations and Anecdotes,
289. — Eloquence, 293. – Power over
an Audience, 295. — Exaggerations,

rope, 245.

[ocr errors]

297. — Style, 298. — Letter from Rev. Controversies, Meaning of the Word, ii.
Joseph Tracy. 298. — Memory, 300. 35, 39, 41.
Quotations, 300.-Fondness för Books, Convention of 1818, between the United
302. - Favorite Pursuits, 303. — Con States and Great Britain, ii. 125. — Of
versation, 305. — Scholarship, 307. 1827, 125.
Home Life, 309. — Fondness for Mu- Convention of Whigs at Baltimore, i. 174.
sic, 309. — - Conversational Power, 311. Convention to Revise the Constitution of

Gentleness, 311. Handwriting, Massachusetts, i. 187 ; ii. 284.
313.

Appearance, 313. – General Copenhagen, Attack on by the English,
Health, 314. Feelings upon Relig ii. 9.

ious Subjects, 315. Death, 316. CROWNINSHIELD, BENJAMIN W., i. 30.
CHOATE, Rufus, Jr., Letters to, i. 191, Cousin on Philosophy, i. 470.
192, 193.

Culture, Mental, developes the Power of
CHOATE, SARAH B., Letters to, i. 188, the State, i. 397. – True Characteris-
191, 193.

tics of, 401. – How best achieved, 406.
CHOATE, WASHINGTON, Death of, i. To be cultivated by the Children of
17.

Labor, 472. — Informs and directs our
Church, “without a Bishop,” i. 379. Exertions, 473. - Refines and adorns
CICERO, i. 454. His Orations against the Spirit, 474. — Soothes and relieves
Antony, 458.

our Burdens, 476.
CLAY, HENRY, Mr. Choate's collision Curtis, B. R., Address of, i. 257.

with, i. 55. His Position in Refer- Cushing, Caleb, ii. 441.
ence to the Annexation of Texas, ii.
272, 281.

Dalton, Mrs., Defence of, i. 222.
CLIFFORD, J. H., Letter from, i. 273., DANA, R. H., Jr., Address of, i. 252.
COLERIDGE, upon the State, i. 426. DANVERS, i. 464.
Upon Law, 436.

Dartmouth College, its Relations to Web-
Columbia River, The, ii. 129.

ster, i. 493, 500. – The famous Case
Commerce, Power of regulating, in the concerning, 514.
Constitution, ii. 102, 103.

Davis, GEORGE T., Letter to, i. 234.
Compromise, The Missouri, ii. 275. — A Davis. JUDGE WOODBURY, Address for

Spirit of, necessary to the Preservation his Removal, ii. 313. — Its Grounds,
of the Union, 319, 325. — Upon Sla 348.
very in the Constitution of the United Debates, British Parliamentary, ii. 228.
States, 323, 324. — Is the Essence of Declaration of Independence, The, Gener-
Politics, 432. — To be ranked among alities of, i. 215. – Put into the Plat-
the Whiter Virtues, 433.

form of a Political Party, ii. 404, 407.
Conscience needs to be Instructed, i. 552; Democracy of Athens, The, i. 427, 435.
ii. 321.

Democratic Club, Oration before the, i.
Conservatism of the Bar, i. 417, 421.

234; ii. 415.
Constitution, The, of the U. S., Webster's DEMOSTHENES, his Early Career, i. 446.

Devotion to, i. 551 ; ii. 416. Confers - His Oration against Philip, 450.
the Power of Protection to Home In His Oration on the Crown, 451. — His
dustry, ii. 99. — Judicial Power under, Death, 452.
25, 27, 58. — Views of its Framers Deposits, Removal of the, Speech upon,
regarding, 29-33. — In Criminal Cases, i. 40.
41, 42. — Adopts the Laws of Nations
as Part of the Law of the U. S., 44, 54. EAMES, CHARLES, i. 195, 254.

- Holds out the Union as the Nation, Eames, Mrs., Letters to, i. 186, 189, 190,
46, 47. — And the Duty of maintaining 194, 196.
Peace, 49. — Treaty-making Power Elective Judiciary, An, ii. 297, 301. -
under, 51, 53, 64.- Law-making Power Offices in General, 298.
under, 57, 64. — Judicial Tenure un- Eloquence of Revolutionary Periods, i.
der, 292, 293. — Doctrine of, regarding 222, 443, 445. — Of Daniel Webster,
Annexation of New Territory, 278. - 517.
Its Compromises upon Slavery, 323, England, Industry of, i. 407.
324. — How it binds the States to- Esser Street Church, Address at, i. 237.
gether, 420.

Evarts, WM. M., Letter to, i. 211.
Constitution of Massachusetts, Convention EVERETT, EDWARD, Nomination of, as
to revise the, i. 187; ii. 284.

Minister to England, i. 56.–Letters to,
Construction of a Written Instrument, Rules 190, 194, 203. — Address of at Faneuil
of, ii. 362.

Hall, on the Death of Mr. Choate, 264.

« PreviousContinue »