Locke: Political Writings

Front Cover
Hackett Publishing, 2003 - Philosophy - 478 pages
John Locke's Second Treatise of Government (c. 1681) is perhaps the key founding liberal text. A Letter Concerning Toleration, written in 1685 ( a year when a Catholic monarch came to the throne of England and Louis XVI unleashed a reign of terror against Protestants in France), is a classic defense of religious freedom. Yet many of Locke’s other writings--not least the Constitutions of Carolina, which he helped draft--are almost defiantly anti-liberal in outlook.

This comprehensive collection brings together the main published works (excluding polemical attacks on other people's views) with the most important surviving evidence from among Locke's papers relating to his political philosophy. David Wootton's wide-ranging and scholarly Introduction sets the writings in the context of their time, examines Locke's developing ideas and unorthodox Christianity, and analyzes his main arguments. The result is the first fully rounded picture of Locke’s political thought in his own words.
 

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Contents

IV
7
V
16
VI
26
VII
36
VIII
49
IX
64
X
77
XI
89
XXXIV
259
XXXV
261
XXXVII
262
XXXVIII
269
XXXIX
272
XL
273
XLI
286
XLII
300

XII
94
XIII
110
XIV
119
XV
123
XVI
131
XVII
137
XVIII
139
XIX
141
XX
146
XXI
152
XXII
177
XXIII
184
XXIV
186
XXV
210
XXVI
232
XXVII
236
XXIX
237
XXX
238
XXXI
240
XXXII
242
XXXIII
247
XLIII
309
XLIV
324
XLV
327
XLVI
328
XLVII
335
XLVIII
337
XLIX
344
L
349
LI
362
LII
363
LIII
369
LIV
387
LV
390
LVI
436
LVII
438
LVIII
440
LIX
442
LX
446
LXI
462
LXII
471
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About the author (2003)

David Wootton is Anniversary Professor of History, University of York.

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