Joseph Fawcett, The Art of War: Its Relation to the Early Development of William Wordsworth

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University of Wisconsin, 1918 - 270 pages
 

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Page 281 - Is lightened ; that serene and blessed mood In which the affections gently lead us on, Until the breath of this corporeal frame, And even the motion of our human blood Almost suspended, we are laid asleep In body, and become a living soul : While with an eye made quiet by the power Of harmony and the deep power of joy, We see into the life of things.
Page 278 - Of such wisdom, the poetic passion, the desire of beauty, the love of art for its own sake,' ' has most. For art comes to you proposing frankly to give nothing but the highest quality to your moments as they pass, and simply for those moments
Page 19 - What though the field be lost ? All is not lost : the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield : And what is else not to be overcome ? That glory never shall his wrath or might 110 Extort from me.
Page 27 - I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to what light I have. I must stand with anybody that stands right; stand with him while he is right, and part with him when he goes wrong.
Page 68 - ... the highest end of the mistress-knowledge, by the Greeks called architeklonike, which stands, as I think, in the knowledge of a man's self, in the ethic and politic consideration, with the end of well-doing, and not of well-knowing only...
Page 112 - What objects are the fountains Of thy happy strain? What fields or waves or mountains? What shapes of sky or plain? What love of thine own kind? what ignorance of pain?
Page 289 - The great secret of morals is love; or a going out of our own nature, and an identification of ourselves with the beautiful which exists in thought, action, or person, not our own. A man, to be greatly good, must imagine intensely and comprehensively; he must put himself in the place of another and of many others; the pains and pleasures of his species must become his own.
Page 26 - When common words were less pleasing to the ear, or less distinct in their signification, I have familiarized the terms of philosophy, by applying them to popular ideas...
Page 176 - The History of the Late Revolution of the Empire of the Great Mogul...
Page 33 - The want of human interest is always felt. Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to take up again.

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