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AMBITION and MODERATION.

Moderation must not claim the merit of combating and conquering ambition ; for they can never exist in the same subject. Moderation is the languor and sloth of the soul ; ambition its activity and ardour.

Maxims, xxxvI.-ROCHEFOUCAULT.

AMBITION and CHOLER.

Ambition is like choler, which is a humour that maketh men active, earnest, full of alacrity, and stirring, if it be not stopped ; but if it be stopped, and cannot have its way, it becometh fiery, and thereby malign and venomous.

Essay on Ambition.-LORD Bacon.

ANGELS. Ministration of
How oft do they their silver bowers leave,
To come to succour us, that succour want ?
How oft do they with golden pinions cleave
The flitting skies, like flying pursuivant
Against fowle fiends to aid us militant.
They for us fight, they watch and duly ward,
And their bright squadrons round about us plant ;
And all for love, and nothing for reward:
Oh! why should heavenly God to man have such
regard !

The Ministry of Angels.--EDMUND SPENSER. ANGLING.

The pleasantest angling is to see the fish
Cut with her golden oars the silver stream,
And greedily devour the treacherous bait.
Much Ado about Nothing, Act 111. Scene I.

SHAKSPERE.

ANGUISH and DISCONTENT.

Corroding Anguish, soul-subduing pain,
And Discontent that clouds the fairest sky,–
A melancholy train.

Genius : An Ode.-H. K. WHITE.

ANIMALS. Against Cruelty to

Heaven's King
Keeps register of every thing,
And nothing may we use in vain :
Ev'n beasts must be with justice slain.

The Fawn.ANDREW MARVEL.

ANTICIPATION and REALISATION.

'Tis an old lesson ; Time approves it true,
And those who know it best, deplore it most ;
When all is won that all desire to woo,
The paltry prize is hardly worth the cost :
Youth wasted, minds degraded, honour lost,
These are thy fruits, successful passion ! these !
If, kindly cruel, early hope is crost,

Still to the last it rankles, a disease,
Not to be cured when love itself forgets to please.
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto 11. Verse xxxv.

LORD BYRON.

APPEARANCE. Affectation of

In every profession, every individual affects to appear what he would willingly be esteemed; so that we may say, the world is composed of nothing but appearances.

Maxims, XI. --ROCHEFOUCAULT.

APPEARANCES. Against judging by

A civil habit
Oft covers a good man ; and you may meet,
In person of a merchant, with a soul
As resolute and free, and all ways worthy,
As else in any fill of mankind.

The Beggar's Bush, Act 11. Scene III.

JOHN FLETCHER.

APPLICATION. Triumph of

Few things are impracticable in themselves ; and it is for want of application, rather than of means, that men fail of success.

Maxims, XXXIX.-ROCHEFOUCAULT.

APTNESS.
What need the bridge much broader than the flood ?
The fairest grant is the necessity !
Look, what will serve is fit.

Much Ado about Nothing, Act 1. Scene 1.-SHAKSPERE.

ASS. The

Poor little foal of an oppressed race !
I love the languid patience of thy face :
And oft with gentle hand I give thee bread,
And clap thy ragged coat, and pat thy head.

To a Young Ass.-SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE.

ASTROLOGY. Falsehood of

Hereafter I will admire God more, and fear astrologers less; not affrighted with their doleful predictions of dearth and drought, collected from the complexions of the planets. Must the earth of necessity be sad, because some ill-natured star is sullen? As if the grass could not grow without asking it leave. Whereas God's power, which made herbs before the stars, can preserve them without their propitious, yea, against their malignant aspects.

Scripture Observations, xvIII.—THOMAS FULLER.

ATHEISM rebuked.

Or own the soul immortal, or invert
All order. Go, mock-majesty! go, man!
And bow to thy superiors of the stall :

Through every scene of sense superior far :
They graze the turf untilld; they drink the stream
Unbrew'd and ever full, and un-embitter'd
With doubts, fears, fruitless hopes, regrets, despairs ;
Mankind's peculiar! Reason's precious dow'r !
No foreign clime they ransack for their robes ;
Nor brothers cite to the litigious bar;
Their good is good entire, unmix'd, unmarr’d;
They find a paradise in every field,
On boughs forbidden, where no curses hang :
Their ill no more than strikes the sense ; unstretch'd
By previous dread, or murmur in the rear :
When the worst comes, it comes unfear'd; one stroke
Begins and ends their woe: they die but once ;
Blest, incommunicable privilege ! for which
Proud man, who rules the globe, and reads the stars,
Philosopher, or hero, sighs in vain.

Night Thoughts, vii. Line 290.-EDWARD YOUNG.

ATHEISTS.

The great atheists indeed are hypocrites, who are ever handling holy things but without feeling ; so as they must needs be cauterized in the end.

Essay on Atheism.-Lord BACON. AVARICE.

Misers mistake gold for their good; whereas it is only a mean of attaining it.

Maxims, XLI. -ROCHEFOUCAULT.

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