The Juvenile Plutarch: Containing Accounts of the Lives of Celebrated Children and of the Infancy of Persons who Have Been Illustrious for Their Virtues Or Talents, Volume 2

Front Cover
Printed, by assignment of the assignees of Richard Phillips, by William Darton, 58, Holborn Hill, 1820 - Biography - 184 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 193 - Yet be it less or more, or soon or slow, It shall be still in strictest measure even To that same lot, however mean or high, Toward which Time leads me, and the will of Heaven ; All is, if I have grace to use it so, As ever in my great Task-Master's eye.
Page 196 - THREE Poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn. The first in loftiness of thought surpassed; The next in majesty •, In both the last. The force of Nature could no further go ; To make a third, she joined the former two.
Page 185 - Miserable they! Who, here entangled in the gathering ice, Take their last look of the descending sun; While, full of death, and fierce with tenfold frost, The long long night, incumbent o'er their heads, Falls horrible.
Page 142 - Whence then comes wisdom? And where is the place of understanding? It is hid from the eyes of all living, and concealed from the birds of the air. Abaddon and Death say, 'We have heard a rumor of it with our ears.
Page 192 - How soon hath Time, the subtle thief of youth, Stolen on his wing my three-and-twentieth year! My hasting days fly on with full career, But my late spring no bud or blossom shew'th.
Page 190 - I had my time, readers, as others have who have good learning bestowed upon them, to be sent to those places, where the opinion was it might be soonest...
Page 141 - For I was a witty child, and had a good spirit. Yea, rather, being good, I came into a body undefiled.
Page 18 - In a corner of a little garden, without informing any person of the circumstance, I wrote in the mould, with my finger, the three initial letters of his name; and, sowing garden cresses in the furrows, covered up the seed, and smoothed the ground. Ten days after, he came running to me, and with astonishment in his countenance told me, that his name was growing in the garden. I smiled at the report, and seemed inclined to disregard it; but he insisted on my going to see what had happened. Yes...
Page 185 - He for the passage sought, attempted since So much in vain, and seeming to be shut By jealous Nature with eternal bars. In these fell regions, in Arzina caught...
Page 191 - I understood them ; others were the smooth elegiac poets, whereof the schools are not scarce, whom both for the pleasing sound of their numerous writing, which in imitation I found most easy, and most agreeable to nature's part in me, and for their matter, which what it is, there be few who know not, I was so allured to read, that no recreation came to me better welcome...

Bibliographic information