The British Poets: Including Translations ...

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Page 20 - A fiery soul which, working out its way, Fretted the pigmy body to decay And o'er-informed the tenement of clay. A daring pilot in extremity, Pleased with the danger, when the waves went high, He sought the storms ; but, for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands to boast his wit...
Page 287 - But Oh! what art can teach, What human voice can reach The sacred organ's praise? Notes inspiring holy love, Notes that wing their heavenly ways To mend the choirs above.
Page 97 - Tis true she bounded by and tripped so light, They had not time to take a steady sight ; For truth has such a face and such a mien As to be loved needs only to be seen.
Page 15 - Promiscuous use of concubine and bride ; Then Israel's monarch after heaven's own heart, His vigorous warmth did variously impart To wives and slaves ; and wide as his command, Scatter'd his Maker's image through the land.
Page 20 - In friendship false, implacable in hate, Resolved to ruin or to rule the state...
Page 263 - Another's diving bow he did adore, Which with a shog casts all the hair before, Till he, with full decorum, brings it back, And rises with a water-spaniel shake. As for his songs, the ladies' dear delight, These sure he took from most of you who write.
Page 86 - And in his father's right and realm's defence, Ne'er to have peace with wit nor truce with sense. The king himself the sacred unction made, As king by office and as priest by trade. In his sinister hand, instead of ball, He placed a mighty mug of potent ale;
Page 144 - With loss of all that mortals hold so dear. Then welcome infamy and public shame, And last, a long farewell to worldly fame ! 'Tis said with ease ; but, oh, how hardly...
Page 288 - Blest above; So when the last and dreadful hour This crumbling pageant shall devour, The trumpet shall be heard on high, The dead shall live, the living die, And Music shall untune the sky!
Page 96 - A MILK-WHITE Hind, immortal and unchanged, Fed on the lawns and in the forest ranged ; Without unspotted, innocent within, She feared no danger, for she knew no sin.

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