LECTURES ON THE BRITISH POETS.

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Page 261 - great should be,— Enlarged winds, that curl the flood, Know no such liberty. <{ Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage ; Minds innocent and quiet take That for a hermitage. If I have freedom in my love And in my soul am free, Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Page 223 - that rolled Mother with infant down the rocks. Their moans The vales redoubled to the hills, and they To Heaven. Their martyred blood and ashes sow O'er all the Italian fields, where still doth sway The triple tyrant ; that from these may grow A hundredfold, who, having learned thy way ; Early may fly the Babylonian wo.
Page 39 - is ours; We have given our hearts away,—a sordid boon! This sea, that bares her bosom to the moon,— The winds, that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers,— For this, for every thing, we are out of tune; It moves us not. Great God! I'd rather be A Pagan suckled
Page 236 - Thy soul was like a star, and dwelt apart; Thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea; Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free : So didst thou travel on life's common way In cheerful godliness, and yet thy heart The lowliest duties on herself did lay.
Page 74 - I thought of Chatterton, the marvellous boy,— The sleepless soul that perished in his pride Of him who walked in glory and in joy, Following his plough, along the mountain-side. By our own spirits are we deified : We poets in our youth begin in gladness ; But thereof come in the end despondency and madness.
Page 186 - Where the bee sucks, there suck I ; In a cowslip's bell I lie; There I couch when owls do cry ; On the bat's back I do fly, After summer, merrily; Merrily, merrily shall I live now, Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.
Page 220 - England :—"Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation rousing herself, like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks. Methinks I see her as an eagle mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her undazzled eyes at the full midday beam, purging and unsealing her long-abused sight at the fountain itself of heavenly radiance/
Page 198 - Alas !—alas ! Why, all the souls that were, were forfeit once, And He that might the vantage best have took Pound out the remedy. How would you be If he, which is the top of judgment, should But judge you as you are ? Oh, think on that; And mercy then will breathe within your lips, Like man new made.
Page 290 - Some of their chiefs were princes of the land: In the first rank of these did Zimri stand ; A man so various that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome : Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong j Was every thing by
Page 59 - Whatever the theme, the maiden sang As if her song could have no ending : I saw her singing at her work, And o'er the sickle bending : I listened, motionless and still; And, when I mounted up the hill, The music in my heart I bore Long after it was heard no more.

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