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Middle English Primers, Chaucer's Prologue, Knight's Tale, and Nonne Prestes Tale (Clar. Press Ed.), and Lounsbury's History of the English Language.

(2.) Detailed History of the Elizabethan and early Stuart Literature, including a general acquaintance with the more important works of the period, and an intimate knowledge of the following :

Spenser : Faerie Queen, Bk. II.
Marlowe : Doctor Faustus, Edward II.
Greene : Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay.
Sidney : Apologie for Poetrie.
Hooker : Ecclesiastical Polity, Book I.
Bacon : Advancement of Learning, Select Essays.
Shakespeare : Richard III., Hamlet, Lear, Henry VIII., Two

Noble Kinsman.

(3.) A general acquaintance with the genius and work of Robert Browning and a special acquaintance with the following poems :-My Last Duchess, A Woman's Last Word, Confessions, Cleon, Andrea del Sarto, The Bishop Orders his Tomb, An Epistle, A Death in the Desert, Saul, Rabbi Ben Ezra, Dis Aliter Vismu, Pisgah Sights, Abt Vogler, Caliban, Up at a Villa, Amphibian, Caliban on Setebos.

Books recommended; Morley's First Sketch of English Literature, Clarendon Press, and Arber Editions of Elizabethan works. Seleotions from Browning, First and

Second Series.

HISTORY.

A minute investigation of English History from A. D. 1603-1689.

Books recommended : Greene's History of the English People, vol. 3; Lingard's History of England, vols. 7–10; Hallam's Constitutional History of England, Chap. VI.-X. ; Ranke's History of England; S. R. Gardiner's Works on this Period; Clarendon's History of the Great Rebellion ; Masson's Life of Milton ; Carlyle's Life of Cromwell ; Forster's Life of Elliott ; Bayne's Chief Actors in the Puritan Revolution.

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S XII. SHORT COURSES OF STUDY FOR GENERAL STUDENTS. -(1.) For the benefit of students who may wish to spend but a short period of time at the University, the Time Table has been so arranged that the following combinations of elasses may be made. The details of the subjects studied in these classes will be found under Courses of Instruction, (SS I and XXL)

(2.) To students who attend the classes of the following courses with regularity and pass the Sessional Examinations (8 x. 3) in the subjects of those courses, certificates will be issued stating the nature of the course pursued and the degree of success attained.

(3.) Two Years Course of Liberal Studies. First Year. -Two of the three-Latin, French, German; English; Mathematics or History and Political Economy; Inorganic Chemistry or Botany. Second Year.-Two of the threeLatin, French, German ; English Literature ; Political Economy or Logic ; Physics or Inorganic Chemistry. (The alternative subjects so far as the Time Table may permit.)

(4.) Two Years Course preparatory to study of Medicine or to Chemical work.- First Year. - French or German, English, Mathematics, Botany, Inorganic Chemistry. Second Year.-French or German, English Literature, Physics, Organic Chemistry, Practical Chemistry.

(5.) Three Years Course preparatory to the study of Engineering.–First Year.–French, German, English, Mathematics, Inorganic Chemistry. Second Year.–German, English Literature, Mathematics, Physics, Practical Chenistry. Third Year.-German, Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Dynamics, Practical Chemistry.

(6.) Two Years Course preparatory to Journalistic work. --First Year.–French, English Literature (1st and 2nd year classes), History (3rd and 4th years classes), Logic and Psychology or Political Economy. Second Year.- French, Advanced English Literature, Ethics, Political Economy or Metaphysics, Constitutional History, Constitutional Law.

(7.) Two Years Course preparatory to Entrance upon Commercial work.--First Year.-French, German, English, Mathematics, Chemistry. Second Year.-French, German, English Literature, Political Economy, Physics, Law of Contracts.

$ XIII.- PRELIMINARY (MEDICAL) EXAMINATION IN GENERAL EDUCATION.- For the convenience of students and other persons who may intend to prosecute the study of Medicine and may wish, on going abroad for that purpose, to possess certificates exempting them from the preliminary examination in general education, which is usually required by Medical Schools of good standing, examinations in the following subjects are conducted by the Faculty of Arts, and certificates are issued to those who succeed in passing them :

(1.) ENGLISH LANGUAGE, including Grammar and Composition.
(2.) ENGLISH HISTORY.
(3.) MODERN GEOGRAPHY.

(4.) LATIN, including Grammar, Translation from specified authors*, and Translation of easy English sentences into Latin prose (as in Smith's Principia Latina, Part IV., Exs. 1-35+).

(5.) ELEMENTS OF MATHEMATICS, comprising (a) Arithmeticincluding Vulgar and Decimal Fractions ; (b) Algebra—including Simple Equations ; (c) Geometry—including the first three books of Euclid or the subjects thereof.

* The books prescribed for October, 1887, are the same as those recommended for the First Year Matriculation Examination (8 V.).

+ These books are mentioned to show the extent of knowledge expected. Other books way of course be used by candidates.

(6.) ELEMENTARY MECHANICS OF SOLIDS AND FLUIDS, comprising the elements of Statics, Dynamics, and Hydrostatics, as treated in Blaikie's Elements of Dynamicst (Thin, Edinburgh).

17 and 8.) ANY Two of the following subjects :
(a) Greek, including

Grammar, Translation from specified authors*, and Translation of easy English sentences into Greek prose.

(6) French, including Grammar, Translation from specified authors*, and Translation of easy English sentences into French.

(c), German, including Grammar, Translation from specified authors*, and Translation of easy English sentences into German.

(d) Natural Philosophy, as in Balfour Stewart's Elementary Lessons in Physicst (Macmillan & Co.).

(e) Logic, as in Jevons' Elementary Lessons in Logict (Macmillan & Co.).

The above examination satisfies the requirements of the Medical Faculty of the University of Edinburgh.

9

This examination will be held on the 5th—11th October, 1887, in the College Library. They will be conducted by instructors of the Arts Faculty. Persons who wish to appear as candidates are required to give notice to the Secretary of the Senatus at least fourteen days before the date of Examination (specifying in such notice the elective subjects in which they wish to be examined), to enter their names in the Register of Candidates, and to pay a fee of Ten Dollars.

$ XIV.-MEDALS AND PRIZES.

(The Senate reserves to itself the right of withholding Medals and

Prizes in cases in which sufficient merit is not shewn.)

THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S GOLD MEDAL, which is offered by His Excellency the Marquis of Lansdowne, GovernorGeneral of the Dominion of Canada, will be awarded to the Undergraduate standing highest among those taking Honours in the department of Classics, the winners of other medals being excluded.

THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S SILVER MEDAL, which is offered by His Excellency the Marquis of Lansdowne, GovernorGeneral of the Dominion of Canada, will be awarded to the Undergraduate standing highest among those taking Honours in Mental and Moral Philosophy, the winners of other medals being excluded. If there should be no candidate for Honours in this department, it will be given to the Undergraduate

* The books pjescribed for October, 1887, are the same as those recommended for the First Year Matriculation Examination (s V.).

+ These books are mentioned to show the extent of knowledge expected. Other books may of course be used by candidates.

standing next the gold medallist in some other department of Honours.

THE SIR Wm. Young Gold Medal, which is offered by the Hon. Sir William Young, Ex-Chief Justice of Nova Scotia, Ex-Chairman of the Board of Governors, will be awarded to the Undergraduate standing highest among those taking Honours in the department of Mathematics and Physics, the winners of other medals being excluded.

TAE DEMILL GOLD MEDAL, which is provided by the Alumni Association, in memory of the late James De Mill, M.A., Professor of Rhetoric and History, will be awarded to the Undergraduate standing highest among those taking Honours in the department of English Literature and History, the winners of other medals being excluded.

THE MACKENZIE GOLD MEDAL, which is provided by the Alumni Association in memory of the late John James MacKenzie, M. A., Ph.D., Professor of Physics, will be awarded to the Undergraduate standing highest among those taking Honours in the department of Experimental Physics and Chemistry, the winners of other medals being excluded.

North BRITISH SOCIETY BURSARY.-A Bursary, of the annual value of $60, has been founded in connection with Dalhousie College by the North British Society of Halifax, to be competed for at the Sessioral Examination of the Second Year's Course in Arts, and held by the successful competitor för two years, namely, during the Third and Fourth Years of the Undergraduate Course in Arts. Candidates must be Undergraduates who have completed two years of the Curriculum, and must be eligible at the proper age, to be members of the North British Society. The next competition will take place in April, 1888.

THE WAVERLEY PRIZE. —This Prize, the interest of an endowment of $1000, will be awarded annually to the student of the Second Year Mathematical Class, who stands highest at the Sessional Examinations in the Mathematics of the year, the winner of the North British Society Bursary being excluded.

THE AVERY PRIZE.-A Prize of the value of $25 is offered by Dr. J. F. A very for competition to the Undergraduates in Arts of the Fourth Year, who are not studying for Honours. It will be awarded to the Undergraduate who stands highest at the Sessional Examinations.

THE EARLY ENGLISH TEXT SOCIETY'S PRIZE, which is offered annually by that Society, and consists of several volumes of the Society's publications, will be awarded to the Student standing highest in the subject of Early English Language and Literature at the Examinations for Honours in the department of English Literature and History.

THE NEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY'S PRIZE, which is offered annually by that Society, and consists of several volumes of the Society's publications, will be awarded to the student who stands highest in the subject of the plays of Shakespeare at the Sessional Examinations of the Second Year in English Literature.

S XV.-MUNRO EXHIBITIONS AND BURSARIES.(1.) The following Exhibitions and Bursaries are offered by Geo. Munro, Esq., of New York, to be competed for at the beginning of the Session of the year 1887-8. viz. :

1. Five Junior Exhibitions,
2. Ten Junior Bursaries,
3. Five Senior Exhibitions,
4. Ten Senior Bursaries.

(2.) The Exhibitions are each of the value of $200 per annum : the Bursaries are each of the value of $150 per annum. Both Exhibitions and Bursaries are tenable for two years.

(3.) The Junior Exhibitions and Bursaries are offered for competition to candidates for matriculation in Arts, provided they have previously neither matriculated* at any University conferring Degrees in Arts, nor appeared as candidates for these Exhibitions and Bursaries more than once.

(4.) The Senior Exchibitions and Bursaries are offered for competition to Undergraduates entering the Third Year of the Arts Course. Candidates must have completed the Second Year of the Arts Course, either at this or at some other University ; but they must not have entered upon the Third Year. They must also have matriculated* within three years or within two years of the date of the competition, according as they may have entered upon their course as undergraduates of the First or of the Second Year, respectively.

(5.) The Junior Exhibitions and Bursaries shall be held during two years, provided the holder (a) attend in consecutive years the classes proper to the first and second years of the Arts Course to the satisfaction of the Faculty, Greek being taken as one of the subjects of each of those years, (b) † pass in all the

* Matriculation consists in entering the name upon the Register of a University as an undergraduate, not in the mere passing of a Matriculation Examination.

# For the purposes of condition (b), Geometry and Algebra shail be reckoned as separate subjects.

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