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I X.-CHEMISTRY.

(McLeod Professorship.)

Professor

Geo. Lawson, Ph. D., LL. D.

Inorganic Chemistry Class.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 9—10 A. M.
Subjects of Lectures :

General Principles : Chemical Affinity. Laws of Combination, by weight, by volume. The Elements. Compounds. Equivalent and Atomic Numbers ; Atomicity. Nomenclature ; Notation ; Formulæ ; Equations. The Non-Metallic Elements considered in detail; their modes of occurrence in nature; preparation in the free state ; their compounds; natural phenomena and artificial processes in which they take part; useful manufactures to which they are related. The Metals considered in regard to their physical and chemical characters and modes of occurrence in nature; Classification of the Metals. Alloys, Amalgams; Constitution of Salts ; Bases, Acids, Radicals. Discussion of the more important Metallic Elements in detail ; their Salts and other compounds ; Metallurgical processes ; Chemical Manufactures,

Text Book : Greene's Edition of Wurtz's Elements of Modern Chemistry (Lippincott, Philadelphia.)

Organic Chemistry Class.

Mondays and Wednesdays, 10–11 A. M. Subjects of Lectures :

Principles of Classification : the Fatty Series ; Aromatic Compounds. Methane and its Homologues, and their Substitution Compounds. Monatomic, Diatomic, Triatomic, and Hexatomic Alcohols. Compound Ethers; Monatomic, Diatomic, and Tetratomic Acids ; Aldehydes ; Cyanogen ; Amines; the Carbohydrates ; Artificial Bases. Benzol and its Derivatives. Alkaloids; Amides ; Colouring Matters ; Albuminoids. Outline of Animal Chemistry.

Class Book : Greene's Edition of Wurtz's Elements of Chemistry. Reference works in the College Library will be recommended during the course.

Chemical Laboratory.

PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY.--Systematic Separation and Detection of Bases and Acids. Preparation of Reagents. The work is done entirely by the students. Where additional time can be given, students will also be exercised in the preparation of, and manipulation with, the more important elementary and compound gases.

Text Book : Macadam's Practical Chemistry.

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. – Instruction is provided in Quantitative Analysis, for the benefit of candidates for Honours in Experimental Physics and Chemistry, and also for students who, having taken Practical Chemistry in their Third Year, are desirous of taking it again in their Fourth Year. Other persons, having a sufficient knowledge of Chemistry. will also be admitted. Instruction is offered not only in General Quantitative Analysis, but also in special work, such as the analysis of Ores, Coal, and other Mineral Substances, Fertilizers, Soils, articles of Food and Drink, Mineral and Household Waters, &c.

Laboratory students are required to replace apparatus which they may destroy ; and those who wish to work in special departments, such as those mentioned above, or to engage in original research, may require to furnish themselves with the necessary apparatus.

Text Book : Fresenius's Quantitative Analysis, Vol. I. Special works in Library will be recommended when necessary.

X.-BOTANY.

Professor...

GEO. LAWSON, Ph. D., LL. D. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10–11 A. M. The course in Botany embraces the subjects of Structural and Physiological Botany, special attention being given to Minute Structure and development of Tissues, the phenomena of Growth and Plant Movements. Also Classification, as illustrated by the leading natural orders of North American plants. A Biological Laboratory, in connection with this class, will be fitted up in the new College Building.

Text Book : Goodale's Physiological'Botany (vol. II. of Gray's Botanical Text Book.) Field Book for Summer Work : Gray's Manual.

§ II.—THE ACADEMIC YEAR.—The academic year consists of one session. The session of 1887–8 will begin on Thursday, 6th October, 1887, and end on Wednesday, 26th April, 1888.

The extension of the session of 1888–9 and of subsequent sessions to eight months is under consideration.*

$ III.-ADMISSION OF STUDENTS.-(1.) Persons of either sex may become students of the College by (u) furnishing satisfactory references or certificates of good moral character † (on first entering the College), (b) entering their names in the Register (annually), and (c) paying the annual Registration fee (S XXI).

(2.) Registered students may on payment of the proper fees ($ xxI), enter any of the ordinary classes of the College. The Tutorial classes are open to members of the ordinary classes in connection with which they are held ; the Advanced classes, to students who have sufficient knowledge of the subjects taught in them.

* See footnote ş X, 2.

+ The registration ticket of the Halifax Medical College will be accepted as a certificate of good moral character.

(3) Students who are candidates for degrees are known as Undergraduates, others as General Students.

SIV.-DEGREES.-(1.) Three baccalaureate degrees are conferred in the Faculty of Arts, those, viz., of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.), Bachelor of Letieis (B. L.) and Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.)

(2) Persons who wish to obtain University Degrees must become Unilergraduates. Persons of either sex may become Undergraduates by (a) passing either one of the Matriculation Examinations or a recognized equivalent (SS v and vi), and (b) matriculating, i. e., entering their names on the. Matricula or Register of Undergraduates,

(3.) Undergraduates must pursue, at the College, specified courses of study, which vary with the degrees for which they are candidates but in the case of all degrees extend over four years. They must also pass the prescribed examinations according to the regulations of $ x.

(4.) Two Matriculation Examinations are held, of lower and higher grade respectively. The First Year Matriculation Examination admits to the First Year of the various courses. The Second Year Matriculation Examination admits to the Second Year of the various courses, and thus enables those who pass it to obtain their degress at the end of three academic years.

(5.) Undergraduates of other Universities may, on producing satisfactory certificates, be admitted ad eundem statum in this University, if on cxamination they are found qualified to enter the classes proper to their years,

But if their previous courses of study have not corresponded to the courses on which they enter in this University, they may be required by the Faculty to take additional classes.

$V.–FIRST YEAR MATRICULATION EXAMINATION. -(1.) The following are the subjects of this Examination :

1 and 2. Two of the following :-Latin, Greek, French, German. (Candidates for B. A. must pass in Latin, and if they are to take Greek as one of the subjects of the First Year, must also pass in Greek.)

LATIN.—Grammar. Composition-Translation of easy sentences, as in Smith’s Principia Latina, Part iv, Exs. 1-35. One Latin book. The following books are recommended :

For 1887 : Cæsar, Gallin War, Book I. ; or Ovid, Metamorphoses, Book IV., Fabb. 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15; Book V., Fabb. 1, 6, 7.

For 1888 : Cæsar, Gallic War, Book I. ; or Virgil, Aeneid, Book I.
For 1889 : Cæsar, Gallic War, Books II. and III. ; or Virgil, Aeneid, Book I.

GREEK.--Grammar. One Greek book. The following books are recommended :

For 1887 : Xenophon, Anabasis, Book II. or Book III.

For 1888 : Xenophon, Anabasis Book III. or Symposium (Wiman's, pub. by J. Allyn, Boston.)

For 1889: Xenophon, Anabasis, Book IV., or Symposium (See above).

FRENCH.-Voltaire: Charles XII, Books I and II ; or Scribe, Bertrand et Raton (Comédie). -Questions in Grammar limited to the Accidence, and based upon the passages selected.-Easy English sen. tences for translation into French.

GERMAN. --Adler's German Reader (Appleton & Co.), Zweiter Abschnitt, 1-4 and 14-17 (inclusive). -Grammar :-First 16 lessons in Otto's German Grammar (omitting the 10th, 11th and 12th lessons).

N. B.-Instead of the books recommended above in Latin, Greek, French and German, candidates may offer equivalents which are not included in the course of study. Such equivalents must have been previously approved by the President.

3. MATHEMATICS. - Arithmetic. Geometry: Euclid's Elements, Books I. and II. Algebra : Simple Rules, and Simple Equations of one unknown quantity, not involving surds.

4. English.—Language : Gramniar, Analysis, Writing from Dictation, Composition. History and Geography : Outlines of English and Canadian History, and General Geography.

The above examination may be conducted partly viva voce.

(2.) Candidates for Munro Exhibitions and Bursaries, whose examinations are approved by the Faculty, shall be exempt from further examination for inatriculation.

(3.) Candidates taking French or German, and those who wish to offer equivalents, are required to give notice to the President, of their intention to appear at this Examination, at least one week before the day on which it is held, and in giving such notice they must state which of subjects 1 and 2 they take and what equivalents they offer instead of books specified above.

(4.) This examination will be held in the College on October 5th-8th, 1887. For the benefit of candidates unable to present themselves on ihese days, an opportunity will be granted of appearing for examination on November 4th-8th. But no student will be admitted as an undergraduate at a later date without the special permission of the Faculty.

SVI.-SECOND YEAR MATRICULATION EXAMINATION. -(1.) The following are the subjects of this examination :

1 and 2. Two of the following: Latin, Greek, French German, Botany. (Candidates for B. A must pass in Latin ; if they are to take Greek as one of the subjects of the Second Year, they must also pass in Greek; if not they may select Greek, or French, or German.

Candidates for B. L. must pass in two languages, of which one must be French or German.-Candidates for B. Sc. must pass in one modern language and in Botany.)

LATIN.—The ordinary* subjects of the First Year Class, as specified in § 1, together with one additional book.

GREEK. —The ordinary* subjects of the First Year Class, as specified in § 1, together with one additional book.

FRENCH. —The subjects of the First French Class, as specified in § 1.

GERMAN. – The subjects of the First German Class, as specified in $ 1.

BOTANY.—The subjects of the lectures of the Botany Class, as specified in § 1.

N. B.-Instead of the books prescribed above in Latin, Greek, French and German, candidates may offer equivalents which are not included in the Course of Study. Such equivalents must have been previously approved by the President.

3. MATHEMATICS. –The subjects of the First Year Class, as specified in § 1.

4. ENGLISH.— In addition to the subjects of the First Year Matriculation Examination (in which special stress will be laid on Composition), candidates will be requircd to pass an examination on the literary subjects specified for the ordinary work of the First Year Class ($ 1) –or the equivalents thereof.

5. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY.—The subjects of the First Year Class ($ 1). ---Candidates may omit this subject ; but in that event they must take it instead of one of the elective subjects in the Third Year.

The above examination may be conducted partly viva voce.

(2.) Candidates who have previously passed in any one or more of the above subjects, or in any portion thereof, either at the Matriculation Examination or at the Sessional Examinations of the First Year, shall be exempt from further examination therein.

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(3.) Persons wishing to enter the Second Year must also present themselves for examination in the subjects of the Second Year Entrance Examination (see § x, 2) either October 12th or on January 4th. But candidates for B. L. are exempted from the examination in Classical Geography, and candidates for B. Sc. from the examination in Classical History and Geography

(4.) Candidates must give at least one fortnight's notice to the President, of their intention to appear at this examination ; and in giving such notice they must state in what Latin,

* The “ordinary,” subjects are those not marked with an asterisk in $ 1.

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