Page images
PDF
EPUB

Oracles of Fortune and Wisdom.

53

wants no great skill in performing, yet - which will not be discovered till we can has gained no little share of applause, understand the bird language, which has both in town and country.

been lot ever since Adam was expelled Take any bird out of a cage, and lay the garden of Eden. To say more on it on the table, then take a small feather, these subjects would be unnecessary, and and wave over its eyes, and it will im- only tire the reader's patience; these spemediately appear as dead, but by taking cimens will be sufficient to instruct him, the feather away it will' revive again; let that all performances of this kind are it lay hold of the stem part of the feather invențions carried on by slight and dewith its feet, and it will twist and turn ception ; that the exhibitors are no more about like a parrot ; you may likewise conjurors than other folks, only through roll it about on the table just as you practice; and that any one might foon please : that the feather is the cause of be capable of the fame, did they beftow all this strange appearance is without their time and attention on things of doubt, but why it should be so is a secret such a nature,

THE ENGLISH FORTUNE - TELLER;
R, THE ORACLES OF FORTUNE AND WISDOM, FOR THE FOUR

SEASONS OF HUMAN LIFE.

Taken front the Greek.

afcribing to each a different share of NO. 1,

those internal agitations which seemed

before confusedly interspersed in the Sapiens ipfe finget Fortunam fibi. whole course of our existence. A va

Senec. Trag

riety, so much like the vicissitude of

the seasons, furnished the poets with THERE are very few persons who sublime images ; opened a large field have not heard it said, that the temper for the perspicacity of astronomers to and constitution of every individual of exert itself; and inspired a sage with a the human {pecies change every seven design calculated for the public good. years, though most of them are unable As this fage lived in those days of to account for this old opinion ; there- idolatry which encouraged men in their fore it is to be hoped that an essay eager desire of prying into futurity, he which traces that idea to its source, and made it his study to reduce the various gives an account of the use that the inquiries after fortune and wisdom to a wisest nations of antiquity made of it, regular systematical order. The numwill be equally acceptable to the cu ber 7 being held facred among the anrious, and to those who thinking that cient nations of the East, he divided mankind having been the same in every his code of inquiring into seven and age, have always wanted the same kind seven ; clasling mankind according to of inoral initructions.

the four seasons of the year, and so The remarkable inconstancy which reduced the inquiries of mankind to shades the character of man in his pas- seven for each sex and season, a mode fions, pyrsyits, and cares, raised in the which will be found hereafter fully to speculative minds of the ancient Greek answer all the purposes of life. philosophers á fyftem, which is called The island of Delos had been many the Septenial Division. They, in ages famous for its temple, where the fact, divided the twelve times seven oracular responses had often given years, which seem to be allotted to Greece and the adjacent nations laws, mankind, into four portions or stages, peace, and war. Nothing of mo

ment

con

nature

three ; and the extremity of winter, astrology or art, who will cquailid 54

Ancient Oracles. ment was done withoat first confult- lations of these times, have occafioned ing the Oracle. In private as well as some little alterations, but which cause public affairs, the temple was not the least material deviation from the tantly visited, infomuch that it was fense of the original. found neceffary after a while to open We have sufficient reasons to deplore another for the particular purpose of the loss of the greatest part of this preanswering such questions as the infinite cious monument, which was found in viciffitude of human affairs required. the ruins of Pompeji ; and consists in Aceordingly, a magnificent temple was fome of the Oracles delivered on the feen to rile amidit the shade of a beau two firit days of each season, a short tifal vale, and upon the fame altar was 'defcription, or introduction prefixed feen placed together the images of For- to each day, the account already tune and Wildoin. It was foon indu- related of the origin and triously reported throughout all Greece, of these Oracles, and a story which ilthat these two goddefles were recon luftrates the morals conveyed through ciled together for the benefit of man the whole design. kind ; that Fortune answered all those It is to be presumed, that we shall who came to consult her upon the le mot be more difficult un point of judg. crets of futurity; and that Pallas, underment and taste than our ancient malthe symbol of Wisdoin, advised them ters the Romans ivere, who preserved how to avail themselves of that know. with veneration the works of the ledge. It may be casily imagined that Greeks, or that, at leait, we shall not nothing was omitted in the rites of this find so much fault with our maiters in Dew worship, that could inspire reve the art of thinking, as not to make rence and ave in the multitude, who

our advantage of these Oracles as the trere the better pleased for secing those Grecians did, since we may apply to regulations suited to the then fathiona- ourselves the antwers, given to the quelble system of thinking of that time.

tions suitable to our years

and situation. According to this fyftem, the tem Before we 'enter" upon the oracular ple was only opened during the first le- part of our plan, it will be just neveral days of each season, when none ceflary to observe here the utility rewere admitted into it, bụt those whose - sulting from it. First, it will be a years answered to the reigning feason; guide to gentlemen and ladies, young it being decided that the spring of life or old, and of whatever flation, how to .ends at one and twenty ; the summer regulate their inquiries when they have at forty-two; the autumn at fixty- a fancy to confult a modern fage in

find which closes the scene, at eighty- his account in consulting our page

mid four. The questions to be asked were conforming in some mealure liis anfiver modelled, or rather dictated by the 'to the lente of ours : for it is cqually priests, who always fuited them to the true with the axioms of morals as maage, sex, and condition of the persons thematics,' that what was good sense who came to inquire, and who, after and truth a thousand years ago, it having delivered their own answers, în mains itill the lame, and will be found the name of Fortune and Wisdom, kept fo ftill a thousand

years

hence. · these pretended Oracles upon record, as Here it is proper "to observe, that well as the ceremonial of the day. each question is anlirered in seven dif

It is from a fragment of these inte ferent ways; first by Fortune, and fe. resting records yet extant, that we at- condly by Wisdomn ; for those who tempt the prosent Paper. The refine- confulted the Oracles were always acment of inodern manners and customs, mitted seven in numbet, and of the the difference of fituation, with respect same fex; but undoubtedly of different to the various improvements and regu- dispositions.

It

[merged small][ocr errors]

age

It is juftly observed by Miiton, that Even this may be accomplished in the it is the bent of our nature to admit molt trivial things brought before the delight; and pleasure, rightly, under- public. The moral of the prelent food, muit be allowed to be that sum- Paper, we flatter ourselves shall be fuch mum bonum concerning which the as will give entire satisfaction to all our ancients loit themselves in vain disputes.. readers, while at the same time their Pleasure, however, seems to be confined fancy will be amused with the manner to one stage of life; when youth, it is brought about. which the French emphatically call. In order to make this entirely clear, La belle is

over, plealure seems to the corresponding Oracles of both Fosexpire at she same time. The enjoy-. tune and Wisdom are to contrived as to ments of manhood are more closely con suit all the queitions which can be puts nected with reason, and dull tranquil-' while a due regard is paid to the team lity is the utmott old age can hope for : son of life for which such Oracle and therefore, Voltaire's observation, that advice is calculated. Thus it will be the spring days of life, which pass by eaty to perceive, that each Oracle of unenjoyed are for ever loft, is too true Fortune has its counterpart in that to need any farther illustration.

of Wisdom. As to the respective To furnish motives for prudent con. fhares of the vo sexes, they will be duct in the affairs of carly life, should fufficiently marked in the introduction be the end of every writer, whose views to each separate bread. ate directed to the welfare of society.

(To be continued.)

81 SECRETS OF NATURE.

[ocr errors]

EXTRACTS FROM ALBERTUS MAGNUS' INVESTIGATION OF THE VIRTUES

OF CERTAIN HERBS.

THE Helictropium, or Sun-Aower, Take the herb Shepherd's Rod, mix fays our naturalitt, is endued with won it. with the juice of the Mandrake, and derful virtues ; for if gathered when it will impregnate the female of any the fun is in the fifth sign of the zodiac, animal it is given to, and produce one of and wrapped in a laurel leat; therero its species. The jaw-tooth of a creature being added a wolf's tooth; the perion thus produced, being fieeped in any liwho carries it about him, shall find that quor, will provoke those who taste it to no body can have the power of using a quarreltoine disposition, which to apany other than mild language to him. pcase, there needs no more than making Moreover, if any thing has been taken them iwallow the juice of the herb Viafrom him by itealth, let him lay it lerian. Noc leis extraordinary is the kinder his head by night, and he thall property of the herb Celandine, which fee the thicf and all the circunstances if fuipended, it is faid, over the head of of the thieft.

a fick perfon, will let him a singing The second herb he takes notice of aloud, if he be Hikely to live ; if to is the Nercle. By holding this herb, die, it will make hiin weep. The herb together with Miltoil in your hand, you Periwinkle, he tells us, being pulseåre free from fear of apparitions, Mix it rized with earth-worms and fengreen, with the juice of Sen green, and linear creates affection between man and wife, your hands rhierexvith, putting a part by putting a portion of it in their food. into any water where there are fish, it A small quantity of the above preparaa will not fail to attract them. With- tion, with lone sulphur, being thrown draw it, and they will disperle imine. into a fith-pond will destroy the fith;

and being applicd to the nouth of the

buffalo,

diately.

$6

Wonderful Properties of Habs. buffalo, will cause an explosion, a pof- flock thither. The herb Centaury is etriori, tremendous to hear. The herb said to have wonderful virtues: for if Cat-mînt; with a stone found in the with the blood of a female puet is put Puet's nest; being held to the nose of into a lamp, all the by-standers will an animal, makes him drop down, to imagine themselves enchanted in such all appearance dead ; but he will soon a manner, that it will appear their recover. Being put into a receptacle position is inverted; supposing their for bees, it prevents their going away ;

heads to be where their feet are : and though they were put into water again, if thrown into the fire, the stars and taken out without any signs of life, shall seem a tilting at one another : in the space of an hour it will restore moreover, when applied to the nose of them to their former vigour. The herb any one, it will operate so as to make dog's-tongue, with the heart of a young hiin run himself out of breath for fear. frog, and its matrix, will, in a short · Sage being rotted under dung, and put time, collect a multitude of dogs to under a glass, will produce a worm, wheresoever it is laid. Put the same or a bird having a tail like a blackherb under your great toe, and it will bird's: the blood of which, if it touch

prevent a dog's barking. Tie it to a a person's breast, renders the person dog's neck, in such a manner that he fo touched senseless for å fortnight. cannot get at it with his teeth, and he Another property of it is, that if the will not ceafe wheeling round, until he powder, it may be reduced to, be put fall as it were dead. The herb Henbane into a lamp, the room in which it mixed with wild Saffron, and given to burns will seem full of serpents. Vera mad dog, kills him instantaneously. vain has, amongst others, a salutary The juice of the above herbs being put property: gather it when the sun is into a silver cup, will break it into in Aries, or the month of March, and small particles; and whosoever would with a grain of Piony of one year's Bring a number of hares together, needs growth, it is a specific to those who are but to carry it with the blood of a le- afflicted with the epilepsy or fits. If put veret in a hare's kin.-The Lily: gather into a rich mould it will produce worms this herb while the sun is in Leo, mix in eight weeks, which are immediate it with the juice of the laurel, which death to whoever touches them. Anodone, bury it for some time under ther property of it is to attract pigeons, dung, and worms shall be bred from which it does surprizingly when put it, which worms being reduced to a into a dove-cot. powder, and applied to one's neck, The next herb Albertus notices, is will not let the bearer sleep; if put Balm-gentle, of which Macer speaks, into a vessel containing cow's milk, and this herb being gathered green and covered with the hide of a cow of one moistened with the juice of a cypress colour, it will dry the 'udders of all. of a year's growth, and infused into any What he next notices is the Milletoe, potage will make it appear

full of worms. which, with another herb called the. Let it be fastened to an ox's neck, and Martagon, has the virtue of opening he will follow you wherever you go. any lock whatfoever. Besides which, A property inherent in the Rose is if

put in the mouth of a person, and that, if with a grain of muftard-seed, that he think of a certain thing, it and the foot of a weasel, it be tied to a will dwell upon his memory, if it be tree, it will bear no fruit so long as it to happen ; if not, it will escape his continues there to make amends for remembrance. Let it be fufpended this malignant effect, it will draw fish from a tree with the wing of a swal- without number to the net that it is low, and birds without number will fastened to.

Examples of Alaying Silver.

57

METALLURGY.

METHOD OF ASSAYING OR TRYING

not pay

been affayed, to see that there is only a

small quantity of Silver in it, so as it GOLD AND SILVER, &c.

may not affect your report ; for in all

Lead there is some Silver left, that will Concluded from our last, Page 23.

the expence

of getting it out.

Besides, there may be some 'Tin in it WHEN the assay is cold, place it which is troublesome, and will require carefully in one of the finall pans in the a larger quantity of Lead to evaporate scale, which the scale-maker will give it. · you with your fcales, and in the other After heating your copple red hot, scales your standard gold weight, viz. (fixed in the mouth of a small crucible, 22 carats ; and then you will see how surrounded with charcoal) put your assay much your Gold is worse or better; as thereon, and by a gentle blast with hand for example: your piece of Gold weigh- bellows, you will bring the whole into ed at first one ounce, and now will not fusion, and then the assay will brighten weigh the standard of 22 carats ; there. and begin to flow, and continue to do fore you put in, to make it even, sup- fo till all the Lead is precipitated into pose 1

carat 2 grs. 3-4ths, then is the the copple (and, was it worth while, Gold reported worse than standard, by might be extracted from thence again ;) I car. 2. gr. 3-4ths ; but if the Gold when it is nearly finished, it must be affay be heavier than the standard you kept in a strong heat, because the Silver put in the standard scale, suppose i car. being now almoft fined, will require a I gr. 1-4th, then it is reported so much greater heat to keep it in fusion, and better than the standard. And thus by entirely to divest itself of the Lead. the weights being made in miniature, Your assay being finished, let it stand the assayer at once knows the report, on the copple in the fire a without the trouble of long calcula- then take the bead of Silver, which is tions.

now pure, and of a fine bright colour, in the shape of a small pea cut in two,

and its fize is bigger or less, in proporThe weights to try Silver by are dif- tion to the richness of the Silver there ferent from those of Gold, particularly is in the ingot you have affayed ; likein the Aflaying ; and they are divided wise, if done right, it will casily sepaaccording to the following table : rate from the copple ; then give it a

24 grains make one pennyweight. blow with a hammer, to take off any 20 pennyweights one ounce. finall particles that may adhere to it. 12 ounces one pound troy.

Observe, that the greater quantity of Now your pound weight in minia- base metal is mixed with Silver, as Copture, for these short processes, should per, Tin, &c. the greater is the quar.not be more than 12 grains ; and all tity of Lead required to refine it'; thus, your ounces and pennyweights

, even to Copper takes fixteen times the quantity a half pennyweight, muft be equally of Lead to precipitate it into the copdivided, and marked thereon with your ple. {tandard weight it oz. 2 dwts.

OF REPORTING THE SILVER ASSAY.

As Silver is made up of a certain Take a piece of Silver, and reduce it standard of goodness, by which it is rill it balances your pound weight; reported, 11 oz. z dwts. of fine Silver, then wrap it up in about fix times the and 18 dwts. of Copper, making i lb. quantity of thin milled lead, that has troy; you must therefore put in one Vol. I.

H

{cale

ute;

PROCESS FOR ASSAYING SILVER.

EXAMPLE OF ASSAYING SILVER,

« PreviousContinue »