An Attempt to Develop the Law of Storms: By Means of Facts, Arranged According to Place and Time ; and Hence to Point Out a Cause for the Variable Winds, with the View to Practical Use in Navigation. Illustrated by Charts and Wood-cuts. ...

Front Cover
(Re-issued) John Weale, 1846 - Hurricanes - 572 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 150 - There is reason to believe that the great circuits of wind, of which the Trade Winds form an integral part, are nearly uniform in all the great oceanic basins ; and that the course of these circuits and of the stormy...
Page 543 - The mercury is sustained in the tube by the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the fluid in the...
Page 477 - ... with a majestic slowness ; at intervals we thought they were coming in a very few minutes to overwhelm us; and small quantities of sand did actually more than once reach us. Again they would retreat so as to be almost out of sight, their tops reaching to the very clouds.
Page 30 - HI- burst from the north-west and intermediate points. The upper regions were from this time illuminated by incessant lightning ; but the quivering sheet of blaze was surpassed in brilliancy by the darts of electric fire which were exploded in every direction. At a little after 2...
Page 31 - The prospect was majestic beyond description : the gigantic waves rolling onwards, seemed as if they would defy all obstruction ; yet as they broke over the careenage they seemed to be lost, the surface of it being entirely covered with floating wrecks of every description ; it was an undulating body of lumber, shingles, staves, barrels, trusses of hay, and every kind of merchandise of a buoyant nature.
Page 310 - This wont do for me, to be the first man out of the ship, and first lieutenant ; we may get to England again, and people may think I paid a great deal of attention to myself and did not care for any body else. No, that wont do ; instead of being the first, I'll see every man, sick and well, out of her before me.
Page 471 - ... which could not be furled in time, were in danger of splitting. The wind blew with great violence, momentarily changing its direction, as if it were sweeping round in short spirals ; the rain which fell in torrents was also precipitated in curves, with short intervals of cessation. Amidst this thick shower, the waterspout was discovered, extending in a tapering form, from a dense stratum of cloud to within thirty feet of the water, where it was hid by the foam of the sea, being whirled upwards...
Page 477 - NW of us, we saw a number of prodigious pillars of sand at different distances, at times moving with great celerity, at others stalking on with a majestic slowness; at intervals we thought they were coming in a few minutes to overwhelm us; and small quantities of sand did actually more than once reach us. Again they would retreat so as to be almost out of sight, their tops reaching to the very clouds.
Page 30 - ... a distant roar, and the lightning, which from midnight had flashed and darted forkedly with few and but momentary intermissions, now, for a space of nearly half a minute, played frightfully between the clouds and the earth with novel and surprising action.
Page 297 - ... near eight; it then abated. The sea during the last period exhibited a most awful scene; the waves swelled to an amazing height, rushed with an impetuosity not to be described on the land, and in a few minutes determined the fate of all the houses in the Bay.

Bibliographic information