Page images
PDF
EPUB

97. Pharamond and Eucrate on Duels....... STEELE

98. Ladies Ilead-dresses.

.... ADDISON

99. The Chief Point of Honour in Men and

Women-Duelling ........................

100. Complaints of Sickness-Characters of

Harry Tersett and Varilas ............. STEELE

101. Uncertainty of Fame-Specimen of a

History of the Reign of Anne I. ......... ADDISON

102. Exercise of the Fan

103. Compliments Extracts on Sincerity ... STEELE

104. Decency of Behaviour .....

Letter on a Female Equestrian ............ HUGHES

105. Will Honeycomb's Knowledge of the

World-various kinds of Pedants ...... ADDISON

106. Spectator's visit to Sir R. de Coverley's

Country Seat-the Knight's domestic

Establishment ....................................

107. Ilis Conduct to his Servants .............. STEELE

108. Character of Will Wimble .................. ADDISON

109. Sir Roger's Ancestors ........................ STEELE

110. On Ghosts and Apparitions.................. ADDISON

111. Immateriality of the Soul .................

112. A Sunday in the Country—Sir Roger's

Behaviour at Church ..............

113. His Account of his Disappointment in

Love .............

114. On the Shame and Fear of Poverty-

Characters of Laertes and Irus .........

115. Labour and Exercise ........................ ADDISON

116. A Hunting Scene with Sir Roger .......... BUDGELL

117. On Witchcraft-Story of Moll White ... ADDISON

118 Sir Roger's Reflections on the Widow-

Love Scene ................................... STEELE

119. Rural Manners--Politeness ............... ADDISON

THE

SPECTATOR.

No 62. FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1711.

Scribendi rectè sapere est et principium, et fons.

HOR. Ars Poet.ver. 309. Sound judgment is the ground of writing well.

ROSCOMMON.

M R . Locke has an admirable reflection upon the difference of wit and judgment, whereby he endeavours to shew the reason why they are not always the talents of the same person. His words are as follow : ' And hence, perhaps, may be given some reason of that common observation, " That men who have a great deal of wit, and prompt memories, have not always the clearest judgment, or deepest reason.” For wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety, wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures, and agreeable visions in the fancy; judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully one from another, ideas wherein can be found the least difference, thereby to avoid being misled by similitude, and by affinity

VOL. VII.

to take one thing for another. This is a way of proceeding quite contrary to metaphor and allusion; wherein, for the most part, lies that entertainment and pleasantry of wit, which strikes so lively on the fancy, and is therefore so acceptable to all people.'

This is, I think, the best and most philosophical account that I have ever met will of wit, which generally, though not always, consists in such a resemblance and congruity of ideas as this author mentions. I shall only add to it, by way of explanation, that every resemblance of ideas is not that which we call wit, unless it be such an one that gives delight and surprise to the reader. These two properties seem essential to wit, more particularly the last of them. In order therefore that the resemblance in the ideas be wit, it is necessary that the ideas should not lie too near one another in the nature of things; for where the likeness is obvious, it gives no surprise. To compare one man's singing to that of another, or to represent the whiteness of any object by that of milk and snow, or the variety of its colours by those of the rainbow, cannot be called wit, unless besides this obvious resemblance, there be some further congruity discovered in the two ideas, that is capable of giving the reader some surprise. Thus when a poet tells us the bosom of his mistress is as white as snow, there is no wit in the comparison ; but when he adds, with a sigh, it is as cold too, it then grows into wit. Every reader's memory may supply him with innumerable instances of the same nature. For this reason, the similitudes in heroic poets, who endeavour rather to fill the mind with great conceptions, than to divert it with such as are new and surprising, have seldom any thing in them that can be called wit. Mr. Locke's account of wit, with this short explanation,

comprehends most of the species of wit, as metaphors, similitudes, allegories, enigmas, mottos, parables, fables, dreams, visions, dramatic writings, burlesque, and all the methods of allusion. There are many other pieces of wit (how remote soever they may appear at first sight from the foregoing description) which upon examination will be found to agree with it.

As true wit generally consists in this resemblance and congruity of ideas, false wit chiefly consists in the resemblance and congruity sometimes of single letters, as in anagrams, chronograms, lipograms, and acrostics : sometimes of syllables, as in echoes and doggerel rhymes : sometimes of words, as in puns and quibbles ; and sometimes of whole sentences or poems, cast into the figures of eggs, axes, or altars: nay, some carry the notion of wit so far, as to ascribe it even to external mimicry; and to look upon a man as an ingenious person, that can resemble the tone, posture, or face of another.

As true wit consists in the resemblance of ideas, and false wit in the resemblance of words, according to the foregoing instances; there is another kind of wit which consists partly in the resemblance of ideas, and partly in the resemblance of words, which for distinction sake I shall call mixt wit. This kind of wit is that which abounds in Cowley, more than in any author that ever wrote. Mr. Waller has likewise a great deal of it. Mr. Dryden is very sparing in it. Milton had a genius much above it. Spencer is in the same class with Milton. The Italians, even in their epic poetry, are full of it. Monsieur Boileau, who formed himself upon the ancient poets, has every where rejected it with scorn. If we look after mixt wit among the Greek writers, we shall find it no where but in the epigrammatists. There are indeed some strokes of it in the little

« PreviousContinue »