The Works of James Russell Lowell, Volume 1

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Page 232 - After regarding it steadfastly, he looked up in my face with a calmness of countenance that I can never forget, and said, ' I know the colour of that blood — it is arterial blood — I cannot be deceived in that colour — that drop of blood is my deathwarrant — I must die.
Page 345 - A sweet attractive kind of grace ; A full assurance given by looks ; Continual comfort in a face, The lineaments of Gospel books — I trow that count'nance cannot lye, Whose thoughts are legible in the eye.
Page 227 - I been nervous about its being a perfect piece, and with that view asked advice and trembled over every page, it would not have been written ; for it is not in my nature to fumble. I will write independently. I have written independently without judgment. I may write independently and with judgment, hereafter. The Genius of Poetry must work out its own salvation in a man. It cannot be matured by law and precept, but by sensation and watchfulness in itself. That which is creative must create itself....
Page 226 - Praise or blame has but a momentary effect on the man whose love of beauty in the abstract makes him a severe critic on his own works. My own domestic criticism has given me pain without comparison beyond what Blackwood...
Page 240 - What the Imagination seizes as Beauty must be truth — whether it existed before or not...
Page 234 - My dear Brown, I should have had her when I was in health, and I should have remained well.
Page 230 - I believe though she has faults — the same as Charmian and Cleopatra might have had. Yet she is a fine thing speaking in a worldly way : for there are two distinct tempers of mind in which we judge of things — the worldly, theatrical and pantomimical; and the unearthly, spiritual and ethereal...
Page 351 - Those faces, young and old, agleam with pale intellectual light, eager with pleased attention, flash upon me once more from the deep recesses of the years with an exquisite pathos. Ah, beautiful young eyes, brimming with love and hope, wholly vanished now in that other world we call the Past, or peering doubtfully through the pensive gloaming of memory, your light impoverishes these cheaper days ! I hear again that rustle of sensation, as they turned to exchange glances over some pithier thought,...
Page 230 - Lord Byron, and this Charmian, hold the first place in our minds; in the latter, John Howard, Bishop Hooker rocking his child's cradle, and you, my dear sister, are the conquering feelings. As a man of the world, I love the rich talk of a Charmian; as an eternal being, I love the thought of you. I should like her to ruin me, and I should like you to save me. I am free from men of pleasure's cares, By dint of feelings far more deep than theirs.
Page 362 - I'll kneel down, And ask of thee forgiveness: so we'll live, And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh At gilded butterflies, and hear poor rogues Talk of court news; and well talk with them too, Who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out; And take upon 's the mystery of things, As if we were God's spies...

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