A Glossary of Yorkshire Words and Phrases: Collected in Whitby and the Neighbourhood. With Examples of Their Colloquial Use, and Allusions to Local Customs and Trditions

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J. R. Smith, 1855 - English language - 204 pages
 

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Page 206 - WESTMORELAND and Cumberland.— Dialogues, Poems, Songs, and Ballads, by various Writers, in the Westmoreland and Cumberland Dialects, now first collected, to which is added a Copious Glossary of Words peculiar to those Counties. Post 8vo, (pp. 408), cloth. 9s.
Page 206 - A GLOSSARY of Provincial Words in use in Wiltshire, showing their Derivation in numerous instances, from the Language of the Anglo-Saxons. By JOHN YONGE AKERMAN, Esq., FSA 12mo, cloth. 3s...
Page 128 - The gentlemen being present, bade him save their lives. Then said the hermit, ' You and yours shall hold your lands of the abbot of Whitby, and his successors, in this manner : That, upon...
Page 128 - The gentlemen being there present, and terrified with the fear of death, bid him enjoyn what he would, so he saved their lives. Then said the hermit, ' You and yours shall hold your lands of the abbot of Whitby, and his successors, in this...
Page 129 - ... without removing by the force of the water. Each of you shall make them in several places at the hour aforenamed (except it be full sea at that hour, which, when it shall happen to pass, that service shall cease), and you shall do this service in remembrance that you did [most cruelly] slay me. And that you may the better call to God for repentance, and find mercy, and do good works, the officer of Eskdale-side shall blow his horn, Out on you, out on you, out on you, for the heinous crime of...
Page 29 - Christmas morning, before break of day, the greatest uproar prevails, by numbers of boys going round from house to house, rapping at every door, and roaring out, ' I wish you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year...
Page 64 - Uncovered coffins' of wainscot were common some years ago, with the initials and figures of the name and age studded on the lid in brassheaded nails ; but coffins covered with black cloth are now commonly seen. The coffin is almost never borne on the shoulders, but either suspended by means of towels passed under it, or on short staves provided for the purpose by the undertakers, and which were customarily, in past days, cast into the grave before beginning...
Page 129 - ... of the clock, the same hour each of you shall set your stakes at the brim of the water, each stake a yard from another, and so yedder...
Page 147 - That is, none at all, but a sudden surprise when a mischief is felt before it is suspected. This proverb is but of an hundred and four years standing, taking its original from Thomas Stafford, who, in the reign of Queen Mary, anno 1557, with a small company, seized on Scarborough Castle (utterly destitute of "provision for resistance) before...
Page 98 - Wh. Gl.; gen. Also freely used of persons, as those who, in illness, do little more than taste their food. The first form is employed sulstantively in each case. See Nip. Neps [neps-J, a kind of shears employed in ' lookin,

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