The Bystander: An Illustrated Weekly, Devoted to Travel, Literature, Art, the Drama, Progress, Locomotion, Volume 8

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Page 124 - I hate him for he is a Christian : But more, for that, in low simplicity, He lends out money gratis, and brings down The rate of usance here with us in Venice. If I can catch him once upon the hip, I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
Page 138 - Skiddaw. Still, I turn back to those great places where I wandered about, participating in their greatness. After all, I could not live in Skiddaw. I could spend a year, two, three years among them, but I must have a prospect of seeing Fleet Street at the end of that time, or I should mope and pine away, I know. Still, Skiddaw is a fine creature.
Page 337 - Delightful scene ! Where all around is gay, men, horses, dogs ; And in each smiling countenance appears Fresh blooming health, and universal joy.
Page 51 - For Breakfast & after Dinner. In making, use LESS QUANTITY, it being so much stronger than ORDINARY COFFEE.
Page 69 - Reader, if you are gifted with nerves like mine, aspire to any character but that of a wit, When you find a tickling relish upon your tongue disposing you to that sort of conversation, especially if you find a preternatural flow of ideas setting in upon you at the sight of a bottle and fresh glasses, avoid giving way to it as you would fly your greatest destruction. If you cannot crush the power of fancy, or that within you which you mistake for such, divert it, give it some other play. Write an...
Page 331 - ... as attaining its end by the use of language natural to us in a state of excitement — but distinguished from other species of composition, not excluded by the former criterion, by permitting a pleasure from the whole consistent with a consciousness of pleasure from the component parts — and the perfection of which is to communicate from each part the greatest immediate pleasure compatible with the largest sum of pleasure on the whole.
Page 241 - SHE'S pretty to walk with: And witty to talk with : And pleasant too to think on. But the best use of all Is, her health is a stale,* And helps us to make us drink on.
Page 36 - He who desires to understand the real history of the English people during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries should read most carefully three books: George Fox's Journal, John Wesley's Journal, and John Henry Newman's Apologia, pro Vita Sua.
Page 138 - Its temporary rise at the end of the eighteenth and at the beginning of the nineteenth century is easily explained.
Page 571 - The first witness was the Hatter. He came in with a teacup in one hand, and a piece of bread and butter in the other. "I beg pardon, your Majesty," he began, "for bringing these in; but I hadn't quite finished my tea when I was sent for." "You ought to have finished," said the King. "When did you begin?

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