Barometer manual

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G.E. Eyre and W. Spottiswoode, 1860 - Barometers - 22 pages
 

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Don't let the 1859 date discourage you from reading this. Forecasting methods have modernized, but the weather signs have stayed the same. This is a great book for amateur weather forecasters. Some do-it-yourself forecasting books have you memorizing the names of types of clouds. It can get confusing knowing which type is which. This shows you how to look at the sky and tell the weather from the descriptions of the clouds. You don't have to know what they are. Puffy, soft, hard, oily, inky. This is one of the best forecasting books I've come across. 

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Page 22 - Remarkable clearness of atmosphere near the horizon, distant objects, such as hills, unusually visible, or raised (by refraction), and what is called " a good hearing day," may be mentioned among the signs of wet, if not wind, to be expected.
Page 11 - ... too often overlooked) — that the longer the time between the signs and the change foretold by them, the longer such altered weather will last; and, on the contrary, the less the time...
Page 22 - ... may be mentioned among signs of wet, if not wind, to be expected. , More than usual twinkling of the stars ; indistinctness or apparent multiplication of the moon's horns ; haloes...
Page 18 - Whether clear or cloudy — a rosy sky at sunset presages fine weather : — a red sky in the morning bad weather, or much wind (perhaps rain): — a grey sky in the morning, fine weather :— a high dawn...
Page 21 - ... wind. Misty clouds forming or hanging on heights show wind and rain coming, if they remain, increase, or descend ; if they rise or disperse, the weather will improve, or become fine.
Page 15 - The range or difference of height shown due to change of direction only, from one of these bearings to the other (supposing strength or force and moisture to remain the same), amounts in these latitudes to about half an inch (as read off). 2. The amount— taken by itself — of vapour, moisture, wet, rain, or snow in the wind, or current of air (direction and strength...
Page 15 - SW. may therefore be called the wind's extreme bearings (rather than poles ?). The range, or difference of height shown, due to change of direction only, from one of these bearings to the other (supposing strength or force, and moisture, to remain the same), amounts in these latitudes to about half an inch (as read off). 2. The amount — taken by itself — of vapour...
Page 12 - Indications of approaching changes of weather, and the direction and force of winds, are shown less by the height of the barometer, than by its falling or rising. Nevertheless, a...
Page 19 - Generally, the softer clouds look, the less wind (but perhaps more rain) may be expected ; — and the harder, more " greasy," rolled, tufted, or ragged, — the stronger the coming wind will prove.
Page 19 - high dawn " is when the first indications of daylight are seen above a bank of clouds, A "low dawn" is when the day breaks on or near the horizon, the first streaks of light being very low down.

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