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Page 49 - Tis hard to say, if greater want of skill Appear in writing or in judging ill ; But, of the two, less dangerous is the offence To tire our patience, than mislead our sense. Some few in that, but numbers err in this ; Ten censure wrong for one who writes amiss : A fool might once himself alone expose : Now one in verse makes many more in prose.
Page 59 - Generous converse ; a soul exempt from pride ; And love to praise, with reason on his side ? Such once were critics ; such the happy few, Athens and Rome in better ages knew. The mighty...
Page 47 - Here lies our good Edmund, whose genius was such, We scarcely can praise it or blame it too much; Who, born for the universe, narrowed his mind, And to party gave up what was meant for mankind...
Page 58 - Unbiased, or by favor, or by spite, Not dully prepossessed, nor blindly right; Though learned, well-bred; and though well-bred, sincere; Modestly bold, and humanly severe; Who to a friend his faults can freely show, And gladly praise the merit of a foe?
Page 53 - So much they scorn the crowd, that if the throng By chance go right, they purposely go wrong; So schismatics the plain believers quit, And are but damn'd for having too much wit.
Page 52 - ... is good sense defaced: Some are bewilder'd in the maze of schools, And some made coxcombs Nature meant but fools. In search of wit these lose their common sense, And then turn critics...
Page 56 - And own stale nonsense which they ne'er invent. Some judge of authors' names, not works, and then Nor praise nor blame the writings, but the men. Of all this servile herd, the worst is he That in proud...
Page 47 - If there be one criterion," said Mr. Burke, " which more than all the rest distinguishes a wise and prudent Government from an administration weak and improvident, it is this, well to know when and in what manner to yield what it is impossible to keep. Early reformations are amicable compromises with a friend in power — Late reformations are terms imposed upon a conquered enemy.
Page 51 - Non audet nisi qui didicit dare; quod medicorum est, Promittunt medici; tractant fabrilia fabri; Scribimus indocti doctique poemata passim.
Page 44 - It should have some manuals of instruction to guide aright the education of the student; and it is for these reasons that we rejoice in the appearance of this second number of a series of volumes, containing collections of the best speeches of the great English Orators.

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