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OPENING OF THE NEW LONDON BRIDGE.

other missiles, till, having no other weapons set-stairs to London-bridge, and through left, they launched the persons of their living which the royal procession was to pass, children from the walls, on the beads of their had taken up their appointed stations on assailants, and finally put each other to the Saturday. sword, rather than die by the hands of the Several of these, particularly those in multitude. At Vitri, also, fifty Jews dis- the lines opposite Somerset-bouse, were tinguished themselves by a similar act of decorated with all the national flags of horrible despair. They chose with com. Europe, presenting in this, as well as in the posure two of their number, a young woman gay attire of the respectable parties of ladies and an old man, who received the charge to and gentlemen seated on platforms on their put the rest of their company to death. decks, one of the most brilliant and im. Those intrusted with the execution of this posing spectacles that ever rested on the fearful duty executed their intructions with- bosom of old Father Thames. out dispute or resistance on the part of the The balustrades of Waterloo were sufferers. When the others were all slain, crowded at an early hour, many persons the old man next received his death at the having taken up their stations there as early hand of the female, and, to close the tragedy, as between five and six o'clock in the this last either fell or threw herself from the morning. Most of these showed, that, if the walls of the place; but having broken her weather permitted, they were determined thigh-bone in the fall, she was plunged by to “ make a day of it,” for they brought the besiegers alive into the fire which con. with them, not only prog for breakfast, sumed the dead bodies.—Scott's Tales of a lunch, and dinner, but also materials for Grandfather.

their evening repast, and before the close of the day there were not a few quietly enjoying their tea in the line of waggons,

with awnings, which were drawn up alongThis grand ceremony, the preparations for side the pathway of the bridge. Some of which had occupied so much attention in these waggons were fitted up with seats, as tbe metropolis for some time past, look the speculations of the owners; and from place on Monday, August 1, 1831, the the prices demanded, and readily given, anniversary of the battle of the Nile, and we should judge that they turned to good presented the most splendid spectacle that account. Others were stationed there by has been witnessed on the Thames for private parties, for the accommodation of many years. The grand attraction of the their friends, and, considering their temscene was, of course, the presence of their porary character, were very convenient. Majesties, who graciously condescended to The appearance of the front of Somersettake that opportunity of honouring the house added greatly to the effect of the citizens of London with a visit.

whole spectacle. On the whole length of It was originally intended that his the terrace, several tiers of seats Majesty should have proceeded through erected, which were occupied even at an the park, and have embarked at Whitehall; early hour with a most respectable combut his Majesty, with a truly paternal pany, chiefly ladies. The windows beanxiety to afford the gratification of a view hind, and the tops of the building in every of the procession to the largest number of place which could command a view, were the inhabitants of the metropolis, consented also thronged with spectators. to embark at the stairs of Somerset-house. At Mr. Calvert's premises, tiers of seats By this alteration, the whole of the pro- were erected to a very considerable extent cession was visible to all the inhabitants of for the accommodation of the friends of Pall-mall, Cockspur-street, and the greater “ the house," who, we understood, to the part of the Strand, and a vast addition was number of 1,000, were also sumptuously made to the splendid arrangements of regaled on this occasion. the day.

The arrangements made at SomersetThe preparations were carried into effect house for the reception of their Majesties, with a precision and regularity which reflect partook of the same order and regularity the highest credit, not only on the foresight which distinguished those in the whole line and good taste of those by whom the of the Bridge. The order of the barges arrangements were planned, but also on appointed to receive the royal party was the discipline and good order of the se- committed to Lieut. Cooley, R. N. The veral parties on whom their execution stairs leading from Somerset-house, as well devolved.

as the platform, were covered with dark Many of the boats and barges which cloth, over which was laid red cloth in that. were to form the double line from Somer- part by which their Majesties were to pass.

were

At the end of the stairs were placed two of their Majesties' approach. Every body splendid union jacks, of rich silk, and of rushed to the side of the Bridge. A royal immense size, but they were not unfolded salute was fired from the brig stationed off until a few moments before the arrival of Southwark Bridge, the shouts from the the Royal party

people on the river increased, the bells of The Royal Family and their Majesties' the churches struck up a merry peal, and suite assembled at the Palace about two in a few minutes the foremost of the royal o'clock, and at a quarter before three the barges was discovered making its way grand procession, consisting of twelve car- through the centre arch of Southwarkriages, was formed in the gardens of the bridge. Palace. The King, who appeared in the It is impossible to give any notion, by Windsor uniform, entered the last carriage, description, of the enthusiastic cheering accompanied by the Queen, the Duchess which accompanied their Majesties from of Cumberland, and the Duchess of Cam- Southwark-bridge to the landing-place at bridge.

London-bridge. At three o'clock the hoisting of the Royal Their Majesties proceeded to the top of Standard of England over the centre of the stairs without resting, although sofas Somerset-house announced the arrival of had been placed on the landing-places for their Majesties. The signal was received the use of their Majesties in case they with loud huzzas from the crowds on the should feel themselves fatigued with the water and at both sides, and was followed long ascent. His Majesty walked up the by discharges of cannon of all sorts from tremendous flight of steps without the the wharfs and barges. A guard of honour, slightest appearance of fatigue. of the Foot Guards, with their band, and Upon reaching the top of the stairs, the also the bands of the household troops, sword and keys of the city were tendered were in the square of Somerset-house, and to his Majesty by the Lord Mayor. His received their Majesties on their arrival, the Majesty was graciously pleased to return bands playing the national anthem, which them to the Lord Mayor, and to signify was responded to by loud and continued his wish that they should remain in his cheering from the surrounding crowds. Lordship's hands. The chairman of the

When the King and Queen appeared on committee then presented his Majesty with the steps descending to the platform from a gold medal, commemorative of the openwhich they were to embark, the cheers ing of the Bridge, having on one side an were renewed so as to be almost deafening. impression of the King's head, and, on the Their Majesties graciously acknowledged reverse, a well-executed view of the new the compliment by bowing repeatedly to Bridge, with the dates of the present cerethe assembled multitudes. His Majesty mony and of the laying of the first stone. looked extremely well, and descended the As soon as these formalities were comstairs with a firm step, declining the aid of pleted, and the whole of the royal party the proffered arm of one of the lords of had assembled in the Pavilion, their Mahis suite.

jesties proceeded to the end of the Bridge Upon his Majesty's arriving opposite amidst that most grateful music to a mothe barges, the band struck up, “God save narch's ears, the enthusiastic plaudits of a the King;" and the discharge of cannon people. Their Majesties were attended by seemed to attract the attention of his Ma- their Royal Highnesses the Dukes of Cumjesty, who graciously condescended to berland and Sussex, and by the principal acknowledge the compliment by taking off members of the royal family. The officers his hat. Between Southwark and London- of the royal household, nearly all the mibridges the scene on the river, at both nisters, and a vast number of the nobility, sides, was equally grand with that above and of the members of the House of ComBlackfriars.

mons, composed the royal procession. The procession moved very slowly along Among these were Sir Robert Peel and his in its way down, from the very considerate lady. "In going to and returning from the wish of their Majesties that all those in the Surrey end of the Bridge, their Majesties line should have a full opportunity of see- threw medals to the spectators on each ing the royal party. In consequence of side. this slow progress, it was past 4 o'clock As soon as it was announced that their before the royal barges reached the Bridge. Majesties were approaching the Bridge, The coup d'ail from the Bridge was of a Mr. Green had caused his balloon to be novel and striking character.

filled, and, just as the Royal procession Shortly after 4 o'clock, the loud and reached the Surrey side of the Bridge, general cheering from the river gave signal Mr. Green, with a Mr. Crawshay for his companion, made his ascent. Their Ma- “I am honoured with the permission of jesties were quite close to the aeronauts his Majesty to propose a toast. I therewhen they ascended, and appeared to take fore beg all his good subjects here assemmuch interest in this part of the entertain- bled to rise and to drink, That health and ments with which their presence was cele- every blessing may attend Her Majesty the brated.

Queen." His Majesty's progress from one end of The Lord Mayor then presented a gold the Bridge to the other was, we suppose, cup of great beauty to the King, who said, considered as the opening of the Bridge. taking the cup, “I cannot but refer on His Majesty showed himself from the this occasion to the great work which has parapets on either side of the Bridge to the been accomplished by the citizens of Lonassembled multitudes below, and was evi- don. The City of London has been redently much struck by the appearance nowned for its magnificent improvements, which the river presented. A hearty burst and we are commemorating a most extraof cheers from the river welcomed the King ordinary instance of their skill and talent. as often as he showed himself. After the I shall propose the source from whence conclusion of this ceremony, their Ma- this vast improvement sprang, “The trade jesties and the Royal suite returned to the and commerce of the city of London.'” Pavilion, erected on the Bridge, where a The King then drank of what is called cold collation was laid out. A similar the Loving Cup, of which every other memrepast was served up to the guests at all ber of the Royal Family partook. the other tables. This banquet was con- His Majesty next drank the health of the ducted upon a scale of profuseness, remark- Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, and, able even in civic feasts, which, as every His lordship, in a few words expressive body knows, are notorious, even to a pro- of the deepest gratitude, thanked his verb, for their magnificent display and Majesty. abundance of good things. The wine, Soon after this toast was drank, the King which was extremely good, flowed more rose, it being near six o'clock, and, bowing freely even than the guests desired; and to the company, intimated his intention to although caterers for the palate work at bid farewell. The chairman of the commanifest disadvantage when their inventive mittee followed the King to the royal powers have only cold materials to work barge. His Majesty again expressed his upon, yet Mr. Leech of the London Coffee- high satisfaction at the grand scene prehouse, who furnished this collation, proved sented to his view, and at the whole of the himself to be an artiste of no ordinary occurrences of the day. stamp.

Thus concluded one of the most gorThe total of the supplies furnished by geous festivals that has occurred for some Mr. Leech were, we understand, as fol- time past in the annals of the metropolis. lows :

At six o'clock their Majesties re-em70 dishes of chickens; 150 hams and tongues ;

barked, amidst the same loud cheering, 75. raised French pies, &c. ; 75 pigeon pies , 40 sir firing of artillery, ringing of bells, and the loins of beef; 50 quarters of lamb ; 250 dishes of shell fish, &c.; 200 ditto salads, cucumbers, &c.;

other tokens of respect which had marked 200 fruit tarts; 200 jellies, creams, and strawberries, their progress down. Their Majesties, on 350 lb. weight pine apples; 100 dishes hot-house

100 neclarines, peaches, apricots, &c. : landing, were loudly cheered as before. 100 green gages, Orleans plums, &c.; 100 currant, raisin, gooseberry, &c.; 150 ornamented Savoy

In going along the platform, her Majesty, cakes, 300 ice-cream, &c.; 300 turtles, roast who leant on the King's arm, turned round chickens, &c.

repeatedly, and bowed to the surrounding As soon as their Majesties had concluded multitudes. His Majesty remained untheir repast-the Lord Mayor rose to drink covered the whole of the way along the his Majesty's health. “ His Most Gracious platform. The cheering at this time was Majesty," said the Lord Mayor, “has incessant. In a few moments after their condescended to permit me to propose a arrival at Somerset House, the royal party toast. I therefore do myself the high entered their carriages, and returned to the honour to propose that we drink His Most Palace,' escorted in the same way as on Gracious Majesty's health with four times setting out. The cheers, as their Majesties four.”

passed along the Strand, were loud and The company rose, and, after cheering continued. The Duke of Sussex was also in the most enthusiastic manner, sang the loudly cheered on his way to and from national anthem of “God save the King." Somerset House.

His Majesty bowed to all around, and The weather throughout the day was appeared to be much pleased.

most favourable; during some part the Sir C. S. Hunter then rose and said, sun shone with great power, but there was

grapes ;

a cool breeze, which greatly moderated the in the service of the understanding, it belongs heat. Towards evening it became agree- to the former ; when merely the slave of the ably cool, with some slight rain, but this senses, to the latter. did not commence till some time after the Even in this its lowest operation, if it procession had returned to the Palace. does not exceed a breeze, or moderate gale, Considering the immense assemblage on it has its uses, and may be indulged, whatthe river and its banks, we are happy to ever the over-wise may pronounce, without say, that we heard but of few accidents, the least imputation. But, in case it is and only one of a fatal nature, that of a suffered to gather to a storm, or to involve young man who was pushed off a wharf at us in its vortex, like a tornado, we become Bankside, and drowned; though only a the creatures of its power; and, from that very short time in the water. Three men moment, begging pardon for so problewere taken into custody charged with the matical an expression, we are never at rest offence.

unless we are in motion. The new London Bridge consists of five So much of levity and vanity there is in beautiful semi-elliptical arches, the respec- our composition, so near akin are we to the tive spans of which are, the first or end chaff and feathers we laugh at, for being the arches, on each side, 130 feet; the second sport of every flurry, that, in the early part of arches on each side, 140 feet; and the our lives at least, few or none of us are in a centre arch, which rises 29 feet six inches capacity to make the necessary resistance. above high-water mark, 152 feet. These On the contrary, we are never so well are constructed solely of granite, of the pleased, as when we abandon ourselves to finest description and workmanship, from every impulse; nor could the angel introthe quarries of Devonshire, Aberdeen, and duced by Addison in his campaign, be more Cornwall.—The width of the carriage-way happy in the direction of his whirlwind, over the Bridge is 36 feet, and the footways than we are in being swept away by ours. 9 feet on each side, making a total width of And having mentioned an angel, we may, 54 feet.

perhaps, adventure also to mention the At present, we believe the gross ex- ladies. A flight may be called their elepenses of the erection of the Bridge exceed ment: and when we consider how many of £650,000-a sum far beyond the original them annually flutter away their precious estimate, but fully justified by the advan- lives in this transporting giddiness, a comtageous alterations adopted in the plans. pliment becomes due to the worshipful The purchases of property to open the company of parish clerks, on their politeness, approaches to the new Bridge are not for not having as yet inserted an article in included in this calculation.

their weekly bills, which might stand in conThe Bridge will be free, funds having tradistinction to that of the still-BORN. been chiefly supplied from the bridge-house Of the vulgar I had rather speak with estates, and a grant of £200,000, from the compassion than bitterness ; and yet, when Treasury. The design for the Bridge was I reflect on the play-house calenture, which made by the late Mr. Rennie; his succes- has seized them with such violence, that they sors, the Messrs. Rennie, executed it. had rather be stifled to-day, than wait till

to-morrow for the same gratification, then attainable with ease and safety, pity seems to be thrown away upon them; and the discipline of St. Luke's more necessary

to be called for.* Let this suffice to shew, [This essay appeared in the London Chronicle,

that I am for confining it to its proper just after the Coronation, September 22nd, 1761. The composition was, at the time, generally at.

bounds. tributed to Dr. Johnson, who was known to be An ordinary entertainment, I therefore, a frequent writer in that paper.]

argue, would be resorted to with an ordinary It is with life as with air : without frequent appetite ; but an extraordinary one, such as ventillations, it would sicken and stagnate, the late coronation was, might be allowed to and therefore it is so ordered, that not only have a suitable effect upon us. It had, our appetites and passions, but our very indeed, a just and rational title to the attenreason, or desire of knowledge, should also tion of the public; and it was, perhaps, an concur in this wholesome and necessary argument of much pride, or little sensibility, operation.

. This alludes to the splendid spectacle of the Curiosity may be called a kind of middle

Coronation, got up at Covent-garden theatre by principle, between reason and passion ; be- Rich the manager, who was said to have expended cause it seems to be in alliance with both.

four thousand pounds in velvet alone, for the pa

But as the performance brought crowded While under the influence, and employed houses, the speculation proved very fortunate.

ON THE CORONATION OF GEORGE III. AND

QUEEN CHARLOTTE.

geant.

companion, made his ascent. Their Ma- “I am honoured with the permission of jesties were quite close to the aeronauts his Majesty to propose a toast. I there when they ascended, and appeared to take fore beg all his good subjects here assemmuch interest in this part of the entertain- bled to rise and to drink, That health and ments with which their presence was cele- every blessing may attend Her Majesty the brated.

Queen." His Majesty's progress from one end of The Lord Mayor then presented a gold the Bridge to the other was, we suppose, cup of great beauty to the King, who said, considered as the opening of the Bridge. taking the cup, “I cannot but refer on His Majesty showed himself from the this occasion to the great work which has parapets on either side of the Bridge to the been accomplished by the citizens of Lonassembled multitudes below, and was evi- don. The City of London has been redently much struck by the appearance nowned for its magnificent improvements, which the river presented. A hearty burst and we are commemorating a most extraof cheers from the river welcomed the King ordinary instance of their skill and talent. as often as he showed himself. After the I shall propose the source from whence conclusion of this ceremony, their Ma- this vast improvement sprang, “The trade jesties and the Royal suite returned to the and commerce of the city of London.'” Pavilion, erected on the Bridge, where a The King then drank of what is called cold collation was laid out. A similar the Loving Cup, of which every other memrepast was served up to the guests at all ber of the Royal Family partook. the other tables. This banquet was con- His Majesty next drank the health of the ducted upon a scale of profuseness, remark- Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, and, able even in civic feasts, which, as every His lordship, in a few words expressive body knows, are notorious, even to a pro- of the deepest gratitude, thanked his verb, for their magnificent display and Majesty. abundance of good things. The wine, Soon after this toast was drank, the King which was extremely good, flowed more rose, it being near six o'clock, and, bowing freely even than the guests desired; and to the company, intimated his intention to although caterers for the palate work at bid farewell. The chairman of the commanifest disadvantage when their inventive mittee followed the King to the royal powers have only cold materials to work barge. His Majesty again expressed his upon, yet Mr. Leech of the London Coffee- high satisfaction at the grand scene prehouse, who furnished this collation, proved sented to his view, and at the whole of the himself to be an artiste of no ordinary occurrences of the day. stamp.

Thus concluded one of the most gorThe total of the supplies furnished by geous festivals that has occurred for some Mr. Leech were, we understand, as fol- time past in the annals of the metropolis, lows :

At six o'clock their Majesties re-em70 dishes of chickens; 150 hams and tongues ;

barked, amidst the same loud cheering, 75 raised French pies, &c. ; 75 pigeon pies , 40 sir firing of artillery, ringing of bells, and the loins of beef; 50 quarters of lamb ; 250 dishes of shell fish, &c.; 200 ditto salads, cucumbers, &c.;

other tokens of respect which had marked 200 fruit tarts; 200 jellies, creams, and strawberries, their progress down. Their Majesties, on 350 lb. weight pipe apples; 100 dishes hot-house grapes; 100 nectarines, peaches, apricots, &c. : landing, were loudly cheered as before. 100 green gages, Orleans plums, &c.; 100 currant, raisin, gooseberry, &c.; 150 ornamented Savoy

In going along the platform, her Majesty, &c. ; 300 turtles, roast who leant on the King's arm, turned round chickens, &c.

repeatedly, and bowed to the surrounding As soon as their Majesties had concluded multitudes. His Majesty remained untheir repast-the Lord Mayor rose to drink covered the whole of the way along the his Majesty's health. “ His Most Gracious platform. The cheering at this time was Majesty," said the Lord Mayor, “has incessant. In a few moments after their condescended to permit me to propose a

arrival at Somerset House, the royal party toast. I therefore do myself the high entered their carriages, and returned to the honour to propose that we drink His Most Palace, escorted in the same way as on Gracious Majesty's health with four times setting out. The cheers, as their Majesties four.”

passed along the Strand, were loud and The company rose, and, after cheering continued. The Duke of Sussex was also in the most enthusiastic manner, sang the loudly cheered on his way to and from national anthem of “God save the King." Somerset House.

His Majesty bowed to all around, and The weather throughout the day was appeared to be much pleased.

most favourable; during some part the Sir C. S. Hunter then rose and said, sun shone with great power, but there was

cakes; 300 ice-cream,

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