The Irish Nation: Its History and Its Biography, Volume 4

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A. Fullarton, 1876 - Ireland

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Page 345 - In happy climes the seat of innocence, Where nature guides and virtue rules, Where men shall not impose for truth and sense, The pedantry of courts and schools : " There shall be sung another golden age, The rise of empire and of arts, The good and great inspiring epic rage, The wisest heads and noblest hearts. " Not such as Europe breeds in her decay ; Such as she bred when fresh and young, When heavenly flame did animate her clay, By future poets shall be sung. " Westward the course of empire takes...
Page 318 - tis his will : Let but the commons hear this testament, (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read) And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue.
Page 102 - O, it is excellent To have a giant's strength ; but it is tyrannous To use it like a giant.
Page 497 - The time would e'er be o'er, And I on thee should look my last, And thou shouldst smile no more ! And still upon that face I look, And think 'twill smile again; And still the thought I will not brook, That I must look in vain ! But when I speak, thou dost not say What thou ne'er left'st unsaid; And now I feel, as well I may, Sweet Mary ! thou art dead...
Page 498 - I speak — thou dost not say What thou ne'er left'st unsaid; And now I feel, as well I may, Sweet Mary, thou art dead! If thou wouldst stay, e'en as thou art, All cold and all serene, I still might press thy silent heart, And where thy smiles have been. While e'en thy chill, bleak corse I have, Thou seemest still mine own; But there I lay thee in thy grave, — And I am now alone!
Page 42 - WHENE'ER a noble deed is wrought, Whene'er is spoken a noble thought, Our hearts, in glad surprise, To higher levels rise. The tidal wave of deeper souls Into our inmost being rolls, And lifts us unawares Out of all meaner cares.
Page 498 - And still upon that face I look, And think 'twill smile again, And still the thought I will not brook That I must look in vain. But, when I speak, thou dost not say What thou ne'er leftst unsaid, And now I feel, as well I may, Sweet Mary! thou art dead. If thou wouldst stay e'en as thou art, All cold, and all serene, I still might press thy silent heart, And where thy smiles have been...
Page 244 - than I can say ; I never remember any " weather that was not too hot, or too cold ; too wet, " or too dry ; but, however God Almighty contrives " it, at the end of the year tis all very well.
Page 345 - Indian scholars and missionaries ; where he most exorbitantly proposes a whole hundred pounds a year for himself, forty pounds for a fellow, and ten for a student. His heart will break if his deanery be not taken from him, and left to your Excellency's disposal. I discouraged him, by the coldness of Courts and Ministers, who will interpret all this as impossible, and a vision, but nothing will do...
Page 286 - I could have borne the rack much better than those killing, killing words of yours. Sometimes I have resolved to die without seeing you more, but those resolves, to your misfortune, did not last long. For there is something in human nature that prompts one so to find relief in this world, I must give way to it, and beg you would see me, and speak kindly to me ; for I am sure you would not condemn any one to suffer what I have done, could you but know it.

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