Myrtles and aloes; or, Our Salcombe sketch book. With a discursive gossip about Kingsbridge by F. Young

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Page 21 - On every side, In a thousand valleys far and wide, Fresh flowers ; while the sun shines warm, And the babe leaps up on his mother's arm...
Page 25 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her; 'tis her privilege Through all the years of this our life, to lead From, joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against...
Page 61 - No flocks that range the valley free, To slaughter I condemn: Taught by that Power that pities me, I learn to pity them...
Page 104 - They moved in tracks of shining white, And when they reared, the elfish light Fell off in hoary flakes. Within the shadow of the ship I watched their rich attire: Blue, glossy green, and velvet black, They coiled and swam; and every track Was a flash of golden fire.
Page 96 - Then the master, With a gesture of command, Waved his hand ; And, at the word, Loud and sudden there was heard, All around them and below, The sound of hammers, blow on blow, Knocking away the shores and spurs. And see ! she stirs ! She starts ! she moves ! she seems to feel The thrill of life along her keel! And, spurning with her foot the ground, With one exulting, joyous bound She leaps into the ocean's arms ! And, lo!
Page 31 - The fan-coral sweeps through the clear deep sea, And the yellow and scarlet tufts of ocean Are bending like corn on the upland lea ; And life in rare and beautiful forms Is sporting amid those bowers of stone, And is safe when the wrathful spirit of storms Has made the top of the waves his own...
Page 1 - Kennst du das Land, wo die Zitronen blühn, Im dunkeln Laub die Gold-Orangen glühn, Ein sanfter Wind vom blauen Himmel weht, Die Myrte still und hoch der Lorbeer steht, Kennst du es wohl? Dahin! Dahin Möcht ich mit dir, o mein Geliebter, ziehn.
Page 145 - Here lie I at the chancel door; Here lie I because I'm poor; The further in the more you'll pay; Here lie I as warm as they.
Page 97 - All around them and below, The sound of hammers, blow on blow, Knocking away the shores and spurs. And see! she stirs! She starts,— she moves,— she seems to feel The thrill of life along her keel, And, spurning with her foot the ground, With one exulting, joyous bound, She leaps into the ocean's arms!
Page 45 - Thy blest approach, and oh, to Heaven how lost, If my ingratitude's unkindly frost Has chilled the bleeding wounds upon thy feet. How oft my guardian angel gently cried, " Soul, from thy casement look, and thou shalt see How he persists to knock and wait for thee ! " And, oh ! how often to that voice of sorrow, " To-morrow we will open," I replied, And when the morrow came, I answered still, "To-morrow.

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