The Novels and Tales of Robert Louis Stevenson: A child's garden of verses. Underwoods. Ballads

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Contents

Not yet my Soul
134
It is not yours O Mother to Complain
136
O Mother Lay your Hand on my Brow
138
Yet O Stricken Heart
139
Peace and her Huge Invasion
140
With Half a Heart
142
i Am a Kind of Farthing Dip i43 XXXI Sing Clearlier Muse
144
The Bed Was Made i45 XXXIII THE COUNTRY OF THE CAMISARDS We Travelled in the Print of Olden Wars
146
For Love of Lovely Words
147
THE PARALLEL Here All is Sunny
148
My House I Say
149
My Body Which My Dungeon is
150
Say not of me that weakly I declined
152
In Scots
153
Table of Common Scottish Vowel Sounds
154
Far yont Amang the Years to be
155
The Clinkumclank o Sabbath Bells
163
O I Wad Like to Ken i69 VII THE BLAST i875 Its Rainin Weets the Gairden Sod
171
My Bonny Man the Warld its True
173
Its Strange that God Should Fash to Frame
176
Dear Thamson Class Whaureer I Gang
178
The Lord Himselin Former Days
181
In Mony a Foreign Pairt Ive Been
184
Late in the Nicht
188
Of athe ills That Flesh can Fear
191
By Lyne and Tyne by Thames and Tees
193
Its an Owercome Sooth for Age an Youth
196
Book III
197
I Once Only by the Garden Gate
201
II To the Heart of Youth
202
I In Dreams Unhappy 20 5
203
II She Rested by the Broken Brook
204
The Infinite Shining Heavens
205
Plain as the Glistering Planets
206
To You let Snow and Roses
208
LET BEAUTY AWAKE
209
Know not How it is With You
210
Will Make You Brooches and Toys
211
Berried Brake and Reedy Island
212
The Cock shall Crow 2i4 XIV MATER TRIUMPHANS Son of my Womans Body
215
Bright is the Ring of Words
216
In the Highlands in the Country Places
217
Home no more Home
218
In the Beloved Hour
220
I Knew thee Strong
221
The Morning DrumCall
223
Have Trod
224
He Hears with Gladdened Heart
225
Farewell Fair Day
226
God if this were enough
227
Trusty Dusky Vivid True
229
In Rigorous Hours
230
The Stormy Evening Closes
231
Since Long Ago
232
The Silver Ship my King
234
Forth from her Land
235
To see the Infinite Pity
236
I Knew a Silver Head
237
Long must Elapse Ere You
238
Resign the Rhapsody
240
Do you Remember
241
The Tropics Vanish
243
I Heard the Pulse
245
Let us who Part
247
In all the Grove
252
As the Single Pang of the Blow
257
Let now your Soul
259
We Uncommiserate Pass
260
Once More I Saw Him
261
Sing Me a Song
262
Blows the Wind Today
264
The Embers of the Day
265

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Page 25 - The world is so full of a number of things, I'm sure we should all be as happy as kings.
Page 200 - Let the blow fall soon or late, Let what will be o'er me; Give the face of earth around And the road before me. Wealth I seek not, hope nor love, Nor a friend to know me; All I seek, the heaven above And the road below me.
Page 129 - REQUIEM UNDER the wide and starry sky, Dig the grave and let me lie. Glad did I live and gladly die, And I laid me down with a will. This be the verse you grave for me : Here he lies where he longed to be; Home is the sailor, home from sea, And the hunter home from the hill.
Page 105 - ... leaping sun, with glancing rain. Here shall the wizard moon ascend The heavens, in the crimson end Of day's declining splendour; here The army of the stars appear. The neighbour hollows dry or wet, Spring shall with tender flowers beset; And oft the morning muser see Larks rising from the broomy lea, And every fairy wheel and thread Of cobweb dew-bediamonded. When daisies go, shall winter time Silver the simple grass with rime; Autumnal frosts enchant the pool And make the cart-ruts beautiful;...
Page 8 - FOREIGN LANDS UP into the cherry tree Who should climb but little me? I held the trunk with both my hands And looked abroad on foreign lands. I saw the next door garden lie, Adorned with flowers, before my eye, And many pleasant places more That I had never seen before.
Page 216 - BRIGHT is the ring of words When the right man rings them, Fair the fall of songs When the singer sings them. Still they are carolled and said — On wings they are carried — After the singer is dead And the maker buried.
Page 31 - THE SUN'S TRAVELS. THE sun is not a-bed, when I At night upon my pillow lie; Still round the earth his way he takes, And morning after morning makes. While here at home, in shining day, We round the sunny garden play, Each little Indian sleepy-head Is being kissed and put to bed.
Page 18 - Afar into the land of Nod. AH by myself I have to go, With none to tell me what to do — All alone beside the streams And up the mountain-sides of dreams. The strangest things are there for me, Both things to eat and things to see, And many frightening sights abroad Till morning in the land of Nod.
Page 19 - I can see. He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head ; And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed. The funniest thing about him is the way he likes to grow — Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow ; For he sometimes shoots up taller like an india-rubber ball, And he sometimes gets so little that there's none of him at all. He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play, And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way. He stays so close beside...
Page 262 - SING me a song of a lad that is gone Say, could that lad be I? Merry of soul he sailed on a day Over the sea to Skye.

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