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“ The Black Brunswickers,” (129), by Mr. Millais, exhibits the supreme technical power of this painter, but has no other merit. A black-uniformed Brunswicker is about to proceed to Waterloo, and urges his way past his ladye-love, who holds the handle of the door, and seeks to prevent his exit. The young lady and young gentleman do not appear perfectly to understand each other, much less could it be expected that we should understand them. Happily, we have not the smallest interest in their difficulty, and merely noticing the masterly drawing and powerful colouring of Mr. Millais, we pass to a picture of which the meaning is as plain as it is weighty.

Few pictures of the year are more remarkable for earnestness of purpose, and force and distinctness of effect, than Mr. A. Solomon's “ Drowned ! Drowned ! ” (478). A party of revellers, masked in various costume, return home, as the first streaks of morning are beginning to break upon the night, across Westminster Bridge. The light of a lamp not seen in the picture, beneath which the party are passing, is shed upon their forms and faces. A “gay" female, flushed, and laughing wildly, hangs on the arm of a profligate, who is first of the band. Suddenly he is arrested by a face which gleams upon him in the light of a policeman's lantern. It is that of a girl who had fallen his victim, and whose stiff and disfigured corpse has just been dragged from the bed of the river. The open mouth and sunken cheek of the corpse show ghastly in the yellow lamp-light, though a wan effulgence of beauty still lingers on the features. A dog, soaked and dripping, that has evidently been employed in recovering the corpse, looks up in the face of the seducer. The latter has started on seeing the face, and taken his cigar from his mouth. His expression, and the gesture of his right hand, are too demonstrative-we had almost said, theatrical ; the paleness of suddenly-sobered guilt, the blank stare of a consciencestricken Cain, are what the mind seeks for the occasion. But his countenance is not without strong feeling, and the stern and literal truthfulness of the story gives to the picture a powerful general effect. An exceedingly tender pathos is added to the whole by the presence of a flower-girl, manifestly the sister of the deceased, who now tends two flower-baskets. The light from the lantern which falls on the face of the corpse touches also the cowslips in the basket by which she once stood !

The pictures in the Academy's Exhibition have occupied almost the entire space at our disposal, and we can add but a few words on two works which merit a far more ample notice. The first is Mr. Barker's “ Meeting of Havelock, Outram, and Sir Colin Campbell,” under the walls of Lucknow; the second, Mr. Holman Hunt's “Finding of the Saviour in the Temple."

Messrs. Agnew and Sons, of Liverpool and Manchester, deserve credit for having commissioned, and Mr. Barkei deserves credit for the way in which he has executed, the noble national picture of the meeting of the Generals at Lucknow, on the 17th of November, 1857. It is national in the best sense. Panoramic in breadth and general effect, it is yet founded throughout upon reality and truth. Skete be made by Mr. Egron Lundgren, a living artist, on the spot, have enatis Mr. Barker to set before us the blaze of Indian light as it really f1.. on stately palm and swarthy cheek-to show us costume as it 14 actually worn—and to convey no inaccurate idea of the palaces, ani cupolas, and gold-touched minarets of the capital of Oude. In puint 2 his figures, the artist has endeavoured to preserve the strictest truth portraiture. The incident he commemorates is one which ought to te imprinted on the memory of the British nation. It is an incident which fathers will tell their children centuries hence, when they wish to stir their nobler impulses by tales of “the brave days of old" Henry Havelock, toil-worn and battle-stained-his brow and chus pale with the anxiety and peril of that terrible advance from Cawapore to Lucknow—is seen in the centre of the picture greeting Colin Campbell. The rugged and stalwart veteran of the Crimea takes the right hand of Havelock in both his, giving him a genuine Hyh land welcome. General Outram, half-a-step behind, introduces Hip lock to the Commander-in-Chief. Left of Havelock, from the spectators point of view, are Sir John Inglis, Sir David Baird, and the nu looking, gallant-looking Metcalfe. These all are on foot. To the rise on horseback, are General Sir James Hope Grant, ('olonel Cirutheast and Major Anson ; while, still farther to the right, and (in fot, ara Horman, Mansfield, William Peel, and Adrian Hope. All the am recognizable; and we gaze long upon them there, as the fierce heat Srik on their foreheads, and the dust and sweat of the fight, which 13 5 now going on, cling to their garments. Sir Colin Campbell's wine charger, held by his Syce in picturesque garb of green, crimsız, and blue, and Adrian Hope's dappled Arab, diversify the prebe. Tua accessories are good. In the right corner, a sun-struck Highlapier » ministered to by a native with water; behind is an elephant r ed to a gun, and one or two red-faced, rattling tars. On the l a wounded soldier stretches in earnest affection towards Ilavelers & camel lies screaming upon the ground ; and some natives quarrrspoil. Behind are the stalwart frames of Sikh horsmen. Bril:D are seen in the distance, from which the roll of British musketry to fall upon the ear; and shattered buildings and burtsing fler speak the desolation and terror of war. Our country frientis vin London, will do well to bend their steps to Waterloo-place, ant kura a long, steady look at this admirable picture,

Very different in kind, belonging to a far more rare and etboral style of art, the first picture of the year, without a sexxond in or oct ? the Academy, is Hunt's "Finding of the Saviour in the Team This, taken all in all, is the highest achievement yet wmught ko. pre-Raphaelite school. It marks the time when all must akaun the promise-in which, at one time, few put trust-to base mi magnificent performance. Shrinking from no severity of his ! research, spending a year and a-half in Palestine in order to study costume and countenance in the ancestral land of the Jews ani

devoting five or six years to the completion of his picture, Mr. Hunt has realized a work which must be classed among the costliest treasures of his country. The scene is the Temple of Moriah, well known to have been the most splendid structure of the olden world. Its floor is rich marble, its porch and pillars are coated with beaten gold. The gleam of golden colour blends with the rich attire of the figures in front, part brilliant in light, part rich, and clear, and cool in shade. Colouring of subtle and exquisite power, purple and white, scarlet and green, blue and delicate red, ravishes the eye with beauty. But the brightness of the surrounding tints does not prevent it from meeting and being arrested by what is indeed the eye of the picture. One fair Boy, the bloom of health upon Him, but solemn purpose and radiant purity in his rapt eye, leads the attention easily captive. He has been “sitting in the midst of the doctors," and has risen as His father and mother entered. His face is full of tender affection for Mary, who is drawing Him to her breast; but a manifest sense of higher relationship teaches us to expect the words—“ Wist ye not that I must be about my Father's business ?” The doctors sit on the left; one ancient rabbi, blind with years ; a younger but hoary man, who speaks with the former; a majestic-looking doctor, in his prime, in whose mind strange thoughts seem to have been awakened by the questionings of Jesus, and who unfolds the book of the Prophets for a conclusive answer; along with several others. Mr. Hunt has admirably avoided the error of anticipating the time when the high priests and doctors had become the irreconcileable enemies of that Boy. Their interest now is in an intelligent and wonderful child, who has left His young companions to seek wisdom among the elders. This mode of treatment is evidently consistent with fact, and gives an inexpressibly gentle and noble charm to the picture. The painter's conception of Christ, also, is new; but he had every right to abandon monkish languor and pallid intellectualism, and to show the Son of David ruddy and beautiful as His father when he followed the flock. We have been able here to give the reader but a glimpse of this picture. We advise him to see it, and study it for himself.

effect, it is yet founded throughout upon reality and truth Sket. ) made by Mr. Egron Lundgren, a living artist, on the spot, have ensin Mr. Barker to set before us the blaze of Indian light as it really in # on stately palm and swarthy cheek-to show us costume as 1: actually worn--and to convey no inaccurate idea of the palaces, s. cupolas, and gold-touched minarets of the capital of Oude. In punt his figures, the artist has endeavoured to preserve the strictest truth portraiture. The incident he commemorates is one which ought to lose imprinted on the memory of the British nation. It is an incident which fathers will tell their children centuries hence, when they w:to stir their nobler impulses by tales of “the brave days of old Henry Havelock, toil-worn and battle-stained-his brow and chori pale with the anxiety and peril of that terrible advance from Carpore to Lucknow-is seen in the centre of the picture greeting Colin Campbell. The rugged and stalwart veteran of the Crimea taka the right hand of Havelock in both his, giving him a genuine Hy land welcome. General Outram, half-a-step behind, introduces Here lock to the Commander-in-Chief. Left of Havelock, from the spectators point of view, are Sir John Inglis, Sir David Baird, and the route looking, gallant-looking Metcalfe. These all are on foot. To the r'at on horseback, are General Sir James Hope Grant, Colonel Girathrai, and Major Anson ; while, still farther to the right, and on fint, un Horman, Mansfield, William Peel, and Adrian Ilope All they are recognizable; and we gaze long upon them there, as the fiere heat sink on their foreheads, and the dust and sweat of the fight, whih in po now going on, cling to their garments. Sir ('olin Campbell's : charger, held by his Syce in picturesque garb of green, crims, ani blue, and Adrian Hope's dappled Arab, diversify the spor Taccessories are good. In the right corner, a sun-struck Highlander :* ministered to by a native with water ; behind is an elephant .to a gun, and one or two red-faced, rattling tars. On the lo . wounded soldier stretches in earnest affection towards llaveixi camel lies screaming upon the ground ; and some nntives quatl Tr spoil. Behind are the stalwart frames of Sikh horsemen. Red are seen in the distance, from which the roll of British muskelry to fall upon the ear; and shattered buildings and burtsin, tam speak the desolation and terror of war. Our country friends, v2-*** London, will do well to bend their steps to Waterloo-place, and has a long, steady look at this admirable picture.

Very different in kind, belonging to a far more ram and ethal style of art, the first picture of the year, without a second in or u ! the Academy, is Hunt's "Finding of the Saviour in the Tetu. ** This, taken all in all, is the highest achievement vet wrowhat is be pre-Raphaelite school. It marks the time when all met ainum . the promise-in which, at one time, few put trust-to have se magnificent performance. Shrinking from no severity of het al research, spending a year and a half in Palestine in onier to stair costume and countenance in the ancestral land of the Jews and

devoting five or six years to the completion of his picture, Mr. Hunt has realized a work which must be classed among the costliest treasures of his country. The scene is the Temple of Moriah, well known to have been the most splendid structure of the olden world. Its floor is rich marble, its porch and pillars are coated with beaten gold. The gleam of golden colour blends with the rich attire of the figures in front, part brilliant in light, part rich, and clear, and cool in shade. Colouring of subtle and exquisite power, purple and white, scarlet and green, blue and delicate red, ravishes the eye with beauty. But the brightness of the surrounding tints does not prevent it from meeting and being arrested by what is indeed the eye of the picture. One fair Boy, the bloom of health upon Him, but solemn purpose and radiant purity in his rapt eye, leads the attention easily captive. He has been 6 sitting in the midst of the doctors," and has risen as His father and mother entered. His face is full of tender affection for Mary, who is drawing Him to her breast; but a manifest sense of higher relationship teaches us to expect the words-"Wist ye not that I must be about my Father's business ?The doctors sit on the left; one ancient rabbi, blind with years; a younger but hoary man, who speaks with the former; a majestic-looking doctor, in his prime, in whose mind strange thoughts seem to have been awakened by the questionings of Jesus, and who unfolds the book of the Prophets for a conclusive answer; along with several others. Mr. Hunt has admirably avoided the error of anticipating the time when the high priests and doctors had become the irreconcileable enemies of that Boy. Their interest now is in an intelligent and wonderful child, who has left His young companions to seek wisdom among the elders. This mode of treatment is evidently consistent with fact, and gives an inexpressibly gentle and noble charm to the picture. The painter's conception of Christ, also, is new; but he had every right to abandon monkish languor and pallid intellectualism, and to show the Son of David ruddy and beautiful as His father when he followed the flock. We have been able here to give the reader but a glimpse of this picture. We advise him to see it, and study it for himself.

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