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Brief Jatires.

EXPOSITORY LECTURES ON St. Paul's healthy organization, having the great

EPISTLES TO THE CORINTHIANS. Byl and daily grace of a good divestim the late Rev. F. W. Robertson, M.A.

the “mens sana in corpore sano," . London : Smith, Elder, and Co., Cornhill.

dangerous competitor at cricket, ad

a formidable companion in mountain WE referred to these lectures in a ! climbing. Everything about him previous number. We notice them healthy and robust-only a physically here as having been recently perfect man could write in so genial published. This notice will suffice a way with so pure and rich enjoras à recommendation to those ment of all the exercises of the spirit who already know Robertson's Ser- as of the body. mons and Lectures. Though com Mr. Beecher may have finely-strung piled from imperfect and various nerves, but commend us to such a sources, such as the short-hand notes physical inheritance as his! He has of his hearers, and his own frag sometinies been called the America mentary MSS., this volume bears the Spurgeon ; but of English preachra, impress of his penetrating, stimu he oftener reminds us of Mr. Binne, lating, and ästhetic mind. We be with perhaps a pinch of Spuren's lieve Mr. Robertson grievously to coarser humour thrown in. He le have erred as to the doctrine of the same masculine breadth of Atonement; but his error lay rather thought, the same genial estimates in attacking the monstrous perver various and contrasting qualities, the sions of that doctrine, which had no same generous appreriation of all for existence save in the realm of the of good, the same hearty enjoyidet shades which peopled his own of the humorous, the same bopal imagination, or in the copper-clasped, outlook into the future, the 4** vellum-bound volumes of our me. utter scorn of wrong and littlepes, diæval libraries. He erred rather in as our great Nonconformist preacher, conceiving a certain phantasy of his only with a richer exuberaner of own to be the creed of orthodoxy, illustration and a greater raciness of than in his own faith. In truth, he anecdotes. He has less self-rustnint, was no dogmatic divine, and should less fastidious taste; he often have kept away from controversial verges on broad farce, and oftenet theology ; but in the earnest and therefore sins against our higher culnoble declaration of such Christian ture. He is more of a Luther than a truth as he had apprehended, we | Melancthon, of a Latimer rather than know no volumes distinguished by a cf John Howe. more simple, manly, pathetic eloquence than his.

Tur Livs op CHARLOTTE BRONTE PE

J. C. Gaskell. A new edition. South SUMMER IN THE Sort; or, Views and

Elder, and C'e. Experience. By Henry Ward Beecber.

MESSRS. Sartu, ELDER, AND (a Edinburgh: Alexander Strahnn and Co.

have issued no buok in their han We are ignorant of Mr. Beccher's crown series of standard works where physique, but we have no hesitation will attain a larger or better deserunt at all in pronouncing him a man of sale than this with the exop

tion, perhaps, of Charlotte Brontë's , a history which enthrals the heart own work,““ Jane Eyre,” of which and memory with as strong a spell this is the fitting companion and as the most thrilling romance. It is the commentary. In this volume, graphically, truly, tenderly written, which is beautifully printed like the and is a monument of the sympathy others in the series, we have the re and ability of the writer, as of the cord of that struggling, mournful genius and sorrow of her lamented life which had already afforded the

friend. incidents and tempered the spirit revealed in "Jane Eyre.” Miss Bronté's novels, especially the first and best, THE BRITISH CONTROVERSIALIST. Vol. are but the reflex of her own experi

II. Third and enlarged Series. Lonence, and by the comparison of this

don: Houlston and Wright. 1859. biography with her works, we are The English monarch who preferred impressed more strongly than by any to determine a cause after he had previous study, of the truth that no heard only one side, since, as he originality or vigour of mind can over averred, if he listened to both he was step the necessary boundaries of its always prizzled, would have laid his experience ; that genius cannot create royal interdict upon the volume bebut only arrange; and that imagina fore us, as an ingenious and wicked tion can select and re-form the ele device for entangling the wits of ments which observation and con

kings and lieges. Its chief design is sciousness bring within its range, but to provide the arena upon which can produce nothing absolutely new. well equipped combatants may conWe read “Jane Eyre," and then this tend in courtly but earnest strife for life of C. Bronté, and breathe the same the laurel of truth in fields religious, atmosphere. We see that the men -- philosophical, political, and economic. the scenery-the quaintly-picturesque There are also biographical sketches, and weird Norse life, so grandly essays, reviews, and literary gossip portrayed in the novel, are no wild interesting to the general reader. unreal dreams, conjured up in the This periodical is well calculated to author's brain, but a revelation given promote a love of dispassionate critiwith photographic fidelity, of the cism among its contributors, and a neighbourhood in which her infancy large and judicial spirit among its and youth were nursed. It is true, readers. with poetic truthfulness and taste, Miss Bronté selected the most characteristic traits of her Yorkshire A SCHOOL AND COLLEGE HISTORY OF home, and illuminated them with the

ENGLAND. By J. C. Curtis, B.A.

London : Simpkin, Marshall, and Co. rich prismatic colouring of her bril

1860. liant imagination. But by so doing she only thus gives them that living Tais history is primarily designed, as reality and force in her books its title indicates, for the young. It which they actually possessed, and begins with that ultima thule of our which they communicated to her annals, “the year B.c. 54," and closes sympathetic mind. Those who at a date no less recent than Novemwould understand “Jane Eyre," or ber, 1859. To tell the story of full "Shirley,” or “Vilette,” must read the nineteen centuries in the brief comlife of their author, where they will pass of some 500 pages, so that it discover the materials which were shall be at once comprehensive and woven into such gorgeous fabrics. in interesting, is not an easy task, as the loom of fancy. It is needless to many failures have sufficiently proved. characterise this volume, which has We may, therefore, the more heartily won a place among our standard congratulate Mr. Curtis upon a sucLiographies. Mrs. Gaskell has written | cess, which may perhaps be partially attributable to his professional know- | the groundwork of every great ledge—as Vice-Principal and Lecturer nature be not settled and stable. at the Borough Road Training College We do not consider this volume to -of exactly what a school history change the common estimate of Shelought to be. We doubt not that he ley's character save in one important will earn the gratitude of many a respect, viz., it tells us that the black school-boy for having clothed the out infidelity of his “ Queen Mab” was lines of English history in so pleasant the savage delirium of his very younga dress; while the more advanced est days, when chafed and tormented reader will appreciate the sound he scarce knew what he wrote ; but ness of judgment with which his was repudiated by himself as woful opinion of men and things is trash, and can in nowise be regarded generally characterised. We may as the outflow of his proper nature, mention, that in order to pro or to represent the settled conviction mote the completeness of the work, of his maturity. much supplementary information is What an undertone of discordant furnished of the history of religion, sadness runs through this life of the trade, commerce, agriculture, and passionate, loving Shelley. There manners and customs, and that intelli is no rest, no faith, no hope in gible genealogical tables are supplied it ; and the affection he wins by his at the commencement of the history pure fantastic earnestness but makes of each period.

us grieve the more for his ill-cloaked misery. The thought of his life

lingers in our memory like the wail SHELLEY MEMORIALS, FROM AUTHENTIC

of a pine-forest, which seems burSOURCES. Edited by Lady Shelley. To dened with an unearthly sorrow; which is appended an Essay on Chris. and it is thus we think of Shelley tianity, by Percy Bysshe Shelley, now

What a difference if his unquiet, first printed. London: Smith, "Elder, and Co., Cornhill.

wild, yet beautiful nature had been

brought into peace with God through THE occasion of the publication of Jesus Christ - if the steady purpose these Memorials is the recent “Life of of Divine consecration had embraced Shelley," which was de licated to the and bound to one centre his generous lady who edits this volume, and was impulses and splendid talents, - if supposed to have her and her family's the conviction of sin had humbled sanction. It now appears that the him, and the love of holiness hud family are indignant at the misuse exalted him, and the cross had been made of the materials they put at the the model and inspiration of his life. disposal of the author of that life, But he had no faith ; and this is the and at the liberty he has taken with source of his weakness and his sorrow. their name; and hence these Me Even his genius was unnerved morials are published by way of pro and dimmed by lack of faith; bis test and refutation. We cannot enter imagination was without controlinto this quarrel ; but we are glad the harp strings were loosely that Lady Shelley has laid these strung. The firmness, and patience Memorials, in the shape of original which religious faith alone could inletters from and to Mr. and Mrs. duce were wanting to command and Shelley, before the public. Such a life chasten himself and his own work; as that of Shelley reads the most yet he hungered after this Divine solemn and profound lessons to this faith, and his changing theories of the age, and they cannot be too frequently universe, like the mirage, were phanrepeated. It shows the misery of tasies awakened by an appetite which life, if at the heart of its agita they only deceived and could not tion there be not central peace---if satisfy. Poor Shelley! His life is the religious faith which must be a monumental warning raised again

beside the highway of our times. | labour of great and acknowledged May its sombre truth be read and difficulty and magnitude-one which pondered by all !

many have attempted — in which The Essay on Christianity must none have fully succeeded. Nor do have been a puerile production, it is we think that such success will ever so exquisitely and innocently feeble. be complete. Perhaps Dante might Though, indeed, where the laws of com have translated Milton had he been mon sense and the reasoning of every his contemporary -- perhaps Milton day life were involved, Shelley never might have translated Dante ; but in escaped the imbecility of youth. He either case we doubt whether the plan regards Jesus, the founder of Christ of translation would have involved ianity, as a greater Socrates. He the imitation of the rhythm. Owing eliminates from the Gospels those to the widely diverse genius of the parts of his teachings which he ad two languages it seems impossible mires, and attributes them to Jesus that an exact translation can be Christ. All the rest is the ex brought into absolutely identical crescence of apostolic ignorance and form; and if this be done, it must superstition. Miracles, of course, necessarily be at the expense of some are myths, and the Epistles the of the living force of the original. partial and false application of the Such is the case in the instance now great moral principles taught by under notice. Mr. Thomas has sucJesus Christ. Many who have taken ceeded wonderfully in keeping to the Queen Mab as the exponent of terza rima of Dante, without awkwardShelley's religious views, will be ness of inflection, and without degratified with the more human senti parture from the sense of his original; ments of this Essay; and we are glad the translation is good-very good; to read anything that will make us and enriched with a valuable mass of think more kindly of Shelley.

notes, illustrative of the historical and classical allusions; but the fire and power of the original is much missing ;

this we believe to be inevitable, and THE POEMS OF HEINE, complete ; trans

we accord much praise for what has lated in the original metres. With a Sketch of Heine's Life. By Edgar

been done. Mr. 'T'homas will henceAlfred Bowring. London: Longman

forth take high rank as a translator. and Co. 1869.

Mr. Bowring is an experienced THE TRILOGY; OR, Dante's THREE

translator ; he has previously given Visioss. INFERNO, OR THE VISION to the English reader excellent verOF HELL. Translated into English, in sions of Schiller and Goethe, like the the metre and triple rhyme of the present, in the original metres. His original: with notes and illustrations,

task is an easier one, in many respects, By the Rev. John Wesley* Thomas. London: H. G. Bohn. 1859.

than that just noticed, owing to the

nature both of the language and of We have classed these two transla the poems; and the result is proportions together for notice, more for the tionately more acceptable in a literary sake of the contrast they present aspect. Heine's poems are, of course, than for any similarity. Both trans essentially German, in tone, in lated with great ability, we may thought, and in allusion; yet so far almost say with consummate appre as manner and freedom are concerned, ciation of the originals ; both retain Mr. Bowring's translations might well ing the form, the metre, and the pass for originals. There is a careless rhyme of the originals ; we have, rich abandon about them, and an exowing to the nature of the two tasks, haustless vocabulary, that would as great a contrast as can well be make it almost difficult to keep in afforded in the result. The Rev. mind that the writer was not revelling J. W. Thomas has confronted a ' in his own thoughts, but was tied

aturbutable to his professional know-, #1
lederas Vice Principal and Lecturer
at the Borough Road Training College

of exactly what a school history
ought to be. We doubt not that he
will earn the gratitude of many a
school-boy for having clothed the out.

of English history in so pleasant a dress; while the more advanced

lines

reader will appreciate th ness of judgment with

and

thin

opinion of men

mention, that in
mote the completenes
much supplementary ;
furnished of the his

manne

at

of each period.

knof- ! the groundwork of every great d Lecturer nature be not settled and stable. ning College We do not consider this volume to

change the common estimate of Sur ley's character save in one importar respect, viz., it tells us that the les infidelity of his “Queen Mabi tas the savage delirium of his very poa's

est days, when chafed and tormenin Lill appreciate the sound he scarce knew what he wrote ; b. judgment with which his

was repudiated by himself as win men and things is trash, and can in nowise be regarded

Characterised. We may as the outfiow of his proper datis generally that in order to pro or to represent the settled convict : the completeness of the work.

of his maturity. upplementary information is What an undertone of discorder: od of the history of religion, sadness runs through this life of RA commerce, agriculture, and

passionate, loving Shelley. Tar and customs, and that intelli

is no rest, no faith, no hope : nealogical tables are supplied it ; and the affection he wins by 19 commencement of the history pure fantastic earnestness but mais

us grieve the inore for his ill-clualmisery. The thought of his .

lingers in our memory like the one STELLET MEMORIALS, FROM AUTHENTIC of a pine-forest, which seems .

Sor RCES. Edited by Lady Shelley. To dened with an unearthly
which is appended an Essay on Chris.

and it is thus we think of Sb:
tianity, by Percy Bysshe Shelley, now
first printed. London: Smith, "Elder,

What a difference if his un , and Co., Cornhill.

wild, yet beautiful nature had two

brought into peace with God thr: The cocasion of the publication of Jesus Christ -- if the steady purpu these Memorials is the recent “Life of

of Divine consecration had emo. Shelley," which was de licated to the and bound to one centre is nei lady who edits this volume, and was į impulses and splendid talen's, supposed to have her and her family's the conviction of sin had ham. sanction. It now appears that the

him, and the love of boliness .. family are indignant at the misuse

exalted him, and the cross had : made of the materials they put at the the model and inspiration of his in disposal of the author of that life, But he had no faith; and thus s and at the liberty he hås taken with source of his weakness and his summer their name ; and hence these Me- Even his genius was una morials are published by way of pro- and dimmed by lack of faith. test and refutation. We cannot enter | imagination was without wat into this quarrel ; but we are glad

re! ; but we are glad the harp strings were that Lady Shelley has laid these strung. The firmness, and po Memorials, in the shape of origina! which religious faith alone con letters from and to Mr. and Mrs. duce were wanting to commasi Shelley, before the public. Such a life chasten himself and his own as that of Shelley reads the most yet be hungered after this Di solemn and profound lessons to this faith, and his changing tbeories of age, and they cannot be too frequently universe, like the murage, were per repeated. It shows the misery of tasies awakened by an appetite life, if at the heart of its agita- ' they only deceived and could tion there be not central peace--if satisfy. Poor Shelley! His the religious faith which must be a monumental warning raised and

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