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greater degree than Richard Knill.

swore at him in a very fearful way, He was a man of no very remarkable

“Form a circle round him," said be ability; he probably was never

to his comrades," and I will sweat : guilty of a transcendental thought in

him." They did so. “He sair his life, but his measure of ability

fearfully, and I wept," san ' was consecrated in its entireness to

Knill. Years after he met whatever purpose he had in hand.

man--a converted man from " This was naturally characteristic of

impressions of that bur. Bu him-a power of sharp, sudden,

consecration to missionary web entire concentration of thought and

equally characteristic. He 30 of energy-and, when he became a | himself to it body and soul pious man, the great motives of reli- ! short time he went to Marlin gion were added to the natural

health failing, he returned to tendencies of character; and the

land, and after a little while w whole was suffused with a sanctity and devotedness that made · him

St. Petersburg, where he way thirteen years. Any bmko

thirteen years. A irresistible. However questionable

l

in health, he returned to E the wisdom of his projects, it was almost impossible to be critical, or to

and for eight years was the true

agent of the London MUE stand aloof while under the spell of his personal presence and urgency.

Society. Then he was fo:

time pastor of the Church a: In the moral results of his life, indeed, far more was accomplished

under-Edge, and finally are;

pastorate of the Commons through the impulses of his fervid Church at Chester, where heart, than the judgment of the wisest head could devise or fulfil.

his useful and holy life. To His sublime simplicity of purpose

bishop of the diocese fobi was more than

to his grave, saying that wisdom to him. The heart is often

“comfort in taking the last

wiser than the head.

good man." He belonged to the Xavier and Henry Martyn class of

This memoir of him, men--the seraph class-men who

very largely of selecties burn-and under similar condition

journals and letters, is . of life, he would have been what they

most interesting incide un were.

high Everything about him par

spiritual teaching took of this simple

thankful for having perton

intensity of character. Nothing that he did can

Mr. Birrell has dischar be conceived of as measured, judicial,

admirably. His volumes

of a refined taste and . or common-place. Whatever his

hert. hand found to do he did with all

It is simple,

and modest. his might. He

The best "Moved altogether if he moved at all." He had a passion for music, and thinking that he could gratify it if he could get into a militia band, he enlisted at once. His conversion was that of the jailer rather than that of Lydia. When the Barnstaple Militia was to be disbanded, he conceived the idea of making every militia man a tract distributor, and went into the barrack-yard when the men were assembled to persuade them to take his tmcts. He suo- is the only d. ceeded, although one of the grenadiers is in love wi

stands before his friendbefore his portrait. It of prolix memoir writing commend it as a mode. memoir should be

TU MINISTER'S 100xQ. Fr

Landin: Sarsson Ls

The plot of this

del simple pattern

This story, as roulders will know, is die

Je pattein. Marv, ts

only daughter of a in love with her cous

merry, and thoughtless sailor. He teristics of the story interest us none
goes away for a three years' voyage, to the less because of it.
the complete satisfaction of the We are forewarned that these facts
widow, who wishes to marry her are more or less re-grouped and modi-
daughter to Dr. Hopkins, a middle fied, and have no right therefore to
aged New England Calvinistic divine, | quarrel with mere anachronisms.
who boards in her house. Word is The incident upon which it is
Tought by a survivor that the sailor founded appears to be the following,
pusin is drowned ; and bowed down which we give in the words of Pro-

the earth in spirit, and gently fessor Park and Dr. Patten, who re

yed on by her mother, Mary con cord it:L uts to marry the Doctor. Prepara “A second matrimonial engage

ms are made for the wedding ; but ment was equally inauspicious. He t at the last moment the ship (the Doctor) had paid his addresses to cked cousin returns an altered a young woman, interesting in her 1, and marries Mary. The episode appearance and manners, and of a Terginie and Colonel Burr, though bright intellect, who was also rather a Jeasant in itself, is skilfully fitted belle. She favoured his suit, and, so Is regards the main incident of the far as appeared, there was a mutual atviz, the wooing and its issue, it tachment. When the time of their mar

perhaps be as well to state that, riage was not far distant, a formerlover, schleh substantially a fact, it is who had been absent some time, re

nly chronologically inaccurate, turned, with the design of renewing Xtremely so. The Doctor was his attentions ; and by indirect, or in 1721 ; and the date of his explicit, manifestations of it excited

arriage was as early as 1748, in her the expectation of an offer to she was living at Great Barring be his wife.” So at least say Drs.

Instead, therefore, of being an Park and Patten ; their meaning, of is died man at forty (the age as course, is “ of an offer to be her hus

to him by Mrs. Stowe in band. The intimation, they con

12), he was a benedict at tinue, “engaged her affections; and

steven ; and when, in 1770, he frankly disclosing the truth to Dr., Lal to Newport, where the scene then Mr. Hopkins, she assured him

imale is laid, had been married that however much she respected

0-and-twenty years ; nor did him, she could not fulfil her engagera the wife of his youth until ment from the heart.'” The month of the termination of This, he said, was a trial, a very His nty-second year, when, after great trial; but as she had not de

9 months' widowhood, he signed to deceive him in the engageJe himself a second, who sur ments. she had given him, he could The h. His first marriage took part with her in friendship.* his frio, eight years before Burr, As in “Uncle Tom's Cabin, we Ortrait es in the tale, was even born, 1. have here a beautifully-painted picmoir WT before the American revolu ture of the effects of profound grief in it as a bh the story repeatedly re strengthening and deepening characuld be past event.

ter. Mrs. Stowe excels in depicting -ronological incorrectness on the discipline of sorrow. We might

of Mrs. Stowe, we mention easily imagine that she has herself d's Toolsó a fact. We attach no im struggled through some great crisis Sampson I to it. The merits of the tale, of affliction, and so writes with all the

e sare, of course, quite inde vividness of one who has actually exlis story. If it. Her mental analysis, perienced what she portrays. Be this

cheations of character, her
ghter of
be kind satire, her life-like

* Park's “ Memoir of Hopkins,” p. 53 ; or cons--these and other charac- | Patten's “ Reminiscences,” p. 31.

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greater degree than Richard Knill. I swore at him in a very fearful was
He was a man of no very remarkable “Form a circle round him," said
ability; he probably was never to his comrades,' and I will swart
guilty of a transcendental thought in him.” They did s0." He
his life, but his measure of ability fearfully, and I wept, ut
was consecrated in its entireness to Knill. Years after he ret
whatever purpose he had in hand. man-a converted man fire
This was naturally characteristic of impressions of that brin.
him-a power of sharp, sudden, consecration to missionary ***
entire concentration of thought and equally characteristic. He
of energy-and, when he became a himself to it body and scal
pious man, the great motives of reli short time he went to ME
yion were added to the natural health failing, he returned
tendencies of character; and the land, and after a little wal
whole was suffused with a sanctity St. Petersburg, where he
and devotedness that made · him thirteen years. A in bo
irresistible. However questionable 1 in health, le returned to
the wisdom of his projects, it was and for eight years was the
almost impossible to be critical, or to agent of the London y
stand aloof while under the spell of Society. Then he was !!
his personal presence and urgency. time pastor of the Churchs:
In the moral results of his life,

under-Edge, and finally. indeed, far more was accomplished

pastorate of the Coet through the impulses of his fervid Church at Chester, we heart, than the judgment of the his useful and holy 1.5 wisest head could devise or fulfil. bishop of the dioce His sublime simplicity of purpose

to his grave, saying tben was more than wisdom to him.! " comiort in taking the The heart is often wiser than good man." the head. He belonged to the This memoir of ! Xavier and Henry Martyn class of very largely of selec.. men-the seraph class-men who journals and letters burn--and under similar condition 1 most interesting in of life, he would have been what they hich spiritual teachine were. Everything about him par thankful for having est took of this simple intensity of character. Nothing that he did can

Mr. Birrell has dist be conceived of as measured, judicial.

admirably. His vol29

of a refined taste or common-place. Whatever bis

la irt. It is itu ! hand found to do he did with all

und modest. The his might. He

lunds before his “Moved altogether if he moved at all."

be ore his poitiiit. 1 He had a passion for music, and

of prolir memoirs
thinking that he could gratify it if
he could get into a militia band, he
enlisted at once. His conversion
was that of the jailer rather than
that of Lydia. When the Barnstaple

THE MINISTER
Militia was to be disbanded, he con-
ceived the idea of making every

Tue plot of the
militia man a tract distributor, and

on L
went into the barrack-yard when the

reuduis will i
men were assembled to persuado
them to take his tract. He sue is the only dai
ceeded, although one of the grenadiers' is in love with

commend it as a memoir should be.

no

Landin Suwa

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111101.

Most

jerry, and thoughtless sailor. He i teristics of the story interest us none ..: tes away for a three years' voyage, to the less because of it.

e complete satisfaction of the We are forewarned that these facts

dow, who wishes to marry her are more or less re-grouped and modiby i ughter to Dr. Hopkins, a middle fied, and have no right therefore to

d New England Calvinistic divine, quarrel with mere anachronisms.

boards in her house. Word is The incident upon which it is bulanght by a survivor that the sailor founded appears to be the following,

in is drowned ; and bowed down which we give in the words of Prole earth in spirit, and gently fessor Park and Dr. Patten, who reIon by her mother, Mary con cord it :

to marry the Doctor. Prepara “A second matrimonial engageDet tre made for the wedding ; but ment was equally inauspicious. He

the last moment the ship (the Doctor) had paid his addresses to

d cousin returns an altered a young woman, interesting in her Harol nd marries Mary. The episode appearance and manners, and of a

inie and Colonel Burr, though bright intellect, who was also rather a plante int in itself, is skilfully fitted belle. She favoured his suit, and, so

gards the main incident of the far as appeared, there was a mutual at

the wooing and its issue, it tachment. When the time of their mari laps be as well to state that, riage was not far distant, a formerlover, sitt substantially a fact, it is who had been absent some time, reSEM V chronologically inaccurate, turned, with the design of renewing waliopo mely so. The Doctor was his attentions ; and by indirect, or

721 ; and the date of his explicit, manifestations of it excited

age was as early as 1748, in her the expectation of an offer to has in, us living at Great Barring be his wife." So at least say Drs.

ad, therefore, of being an Park and Patten ; their meaning, of

man at forty (the age as course, is “ of an offer to be her husva ser him by Mrs. Stowo in band. The intimation, they con

he was a benedict at tinue, “engaged her affections; and 1; and when, in 1770, he frankly disclosing the truth to Dr., Tewport, where the scene then Mr. Hopkins, she assured him

laid, had been married that however much she respected

i l-twenty years ; nor did him, she could not fulfil her engagewith obvife of his youth until ment from the heart.'” best kalmth of the termination of This, he said, was a trial, a very mi piele Eleond year, when, after great trial; but as she had not de

admirable nths' widowhood, he signed to deceive him in the engageT lf a second, who sur ments . she had given him, he could The lis first marriage took

part with her in friendship * in his tht years before Burr, As in “Uncle Tom's Cabin," we

portrall the tale, was even born, · have here a beautifully-painted pic

memoir We the American revolu ture of the effects of profound grief in i nd it as å le story repeatedly re

strengthening and deepening characshould be ist event.

ter. Mrs. Stowe excels in depicting slogical incorrectness on the discipline of sorrow. We might

Ars. Stowe, we mention easily imagine that she has herself JANISTER'S Woor act. We attach no imem: Sampson. The merits of the tale,

struggled through some great crisis

of affliction, and so writes with all the of this stort. of course, quite inde vividness of one who has actually exFill know, is t. Her mental analysis, perienced what she portrays. Be this attern. Marv tions of character, her į daughter of kind satire, her life-like * Park's “Memoir of Hopkins," p. 53; wiw her cotthese and other charac- | Patten's “ Reminiscences," p. 01.

i des de fery Liput !;

condition, it into

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greater degree than Richard Knill. I swore at him in a very fearfal
He was a man of no very remarkable “Form a circle round him, si
ability; he probably was never to his comrades, and I will ne
guilty of a transcendental thought in him.” They did so. "He w
his life, but his measure of ability fearfully, and I went," s
was consecrated in its entireness to Knill. Years after he lei!
whatever purpose he had in hand. man-a converted man from
This was naturally characteristic of impressions of that be!
him--a power of sharp, sudden, consecration to missionary
entire concentration of thought and equally characteristic. He
of energy-and, when he became a himself to it body and goa!
pious man, the great motives of reli short time he went to M-
gion were added to the natural health failing, he returned /
tendencies of character; and the land, and after a little
whole was suffused with a sanctity St. Petersburg, where !
and devotedness that made him thirteen years. A n
irresistible. However questionable in health, le returnd.
the wisdom of his projects, it was and for eight years was
almost impossible to be critical, or to agent of the Lord !
stand aloof while under the spell of Society. Then he wis |
his personal presence and urgency. time pastor of the Chur1
In the moral results of his life, under-Edge, and finalls i
indeed, far more was accomplished pastorate of the !
through the impulses of his fervid Church at Chester, v'!
heart, than the judgment of the his useful and hair:
wisest head could devise or fulfil. bishop of the diocese
His sublime simplicity of purpose to his grave, saying "
was more than wisdom to him.! “comfort in taking a
The heart is often wiser than

good man."
the head. He belonged to the This memoir of!
Xavier and Henry Martyn class of very largely of seie
men-the seraph class-men who journals and lettere
burn-and under similar condition most interesting i
of life, he would have been what they high spiritual tes.
were. Everything about him par thankful for having
took of this simple intensity of

Mr. Birrell hasi
character. Nothing that he did can
be conceived of as measured, judicial.

admirably. His

of a refined tasi. or common-place. Whatever be

le irt. It is si hand found to do he did with all

au modest T his might. He

lvinds before hi “Moved altogether if he moved at all."

berore his portti
He had a passion for music, and

of prolix memoi
thinking that he could gratify it if
he could get into a militia band, he

memoir should be
enlisted at once. His conversion
was that of the jailer rather than
that of Lydia. When the Barnstaple

THE VIVIST)
Militia was to be disbanded, he con-
ceived the idea of making every
militia man a tract distributor, and

The plot of )
went into the barrack-yand when the readers will
men were assembled to persuade simple pattern
them to take his tracts. He sue is the only day
ceeded, although one of the grenadiers is in love with!!

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