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might have been expected to withhold their due meed of praise from the irregular modes of religious activity they witnessed and yet admired. They describe with great fairness and accuracy what they witnessed at Turin, Milan, Florence, Genoa, and elsewhere; and the general impression their statement leaves upon the mind is, that it will be a shame and sorrow to England in after years if British Christians now stand aloof from their brethren now labouring to spread the Gospel in Italy. We are not aware to what extent their appeal has been responded to; but we have reason to believe that hitherto a very limited sum has been placed at the disposal of the Foreign Aid Society for this object. Of course, the claim is yet new, and popular interest must gradually be awakened in it.*

And now comes the Evangelical Continental Society, which is supported almost entirely by Nonconformists. We find that this society has issued a series of appeals on behalf of Italy from the commencement of the opportunity in its favour. These appeals have been widely circulated, and extracts from its correspondence have been published. And with what result ? At a soirée held in London, on the 1st of February, the secretary announced that the subscriptions for Italy amounted to three hundred pounds. This is but a paltry sum, and seems to be a reproach to British Nonconformists. Why, compare this with the large amounts enthusiastically forwarded to Garibaldi to buy rifles and gunpowder. The list is before us, and we find that only one Dissenting congregation in all England has contributed six pounds as a collection

* This letter from Mrs. Desanctis may interest English readers in the school that is so admirably conducted by her husband and herself :

"July 23. “I am anxious to give you a few details of the examination which took place on the 20th instant. It would have rejoiced your heart to have seen how the numbers have increased. Every seat in the chapel was taken up by these dear children, and their happy countenances showed how delighted they were that the long-expected day had at last arrived. At one end of the room were placed two tables, one containing the prizes and upon the other were exhibited a variety of things, such as shirts, collars, samplers, &c., which had been made by the elder girls ;--letters written in French and Italian, copy-books and several other things written by both boys and girls. There was also a list containing the names of all! the children, showing how many had been regular in attending the Sunday school, and another list of good conduct. But all eyes were directed to the table contam: ing the prizes, where besides the Bibles and Testaments, and other neatly bound books, were the two large silver medals, the gift of our valued friend Gavazzi, for the two boys who had made the greatest progress in knowledge of the Holy Scriptures

" It was sweet to hear these dear children lift up their voices in praising Lord. All joined in chorus most sweetly. After the Hymn was suns, Desanctis came forward with the Bible in his hand, and commenced the esamination. Two of the boys, Carnano and Bernato, showed such thorough acquaintan with God's Word that there was no doubt that each deserved the honoured prike their answers were so correct and given in such exact Scripture language.

received a sum of money, left as a legacy to his wife. This sum he immediately devoted to the purchase and fitting up of a house for public worship, in order to overcome the difficulty of finding proper accommodation.* Many of them give all the time and money they can to help on the work. But since they are for the most part poor, and new openings are continually presenting themselves foreign aid is imperatively required. To supply this, there is the Committee for Italian Evangelization at Geneva, which does more than contribute money, inasmuch as it, to a certain extent, directs the movements of its agents. The principal member of this Committee is the excellent Colonel Tronchin. Another Committee exists at Nice, mainly composed of Englishmen, and this, like its Genevan colleague, not only collects, but looks after the appropriation of its funds.f It is much the same with the Waldenses. Then there are certain individuals who superintend the distribution of funds entrusted to them. In England, there are generous and devoted Christians who give or collect money for the same purpose, and the case may be the same elsewhere. Sympathy is all very well, but money must be had, for rents have to be paid, and the expenses of the meetings must be met. Evangelists, with their wives and families, must be kept from starvation, and books must be purchased. Travelling involves an outlay; and when the converts have done their utmost, a wide margin remains to be filled up. In some cases, agents have to be trained, and fitted for their work. But to return to the sources of supply. There are certain committees for continental evangelization in Scotland, Ireland, and England. In Scotland the Free Church vigorously assist the Waldenses. In England, we find two Societies, the Foreign Aid and the Evangelical Continental; and also an Italian Committee. This latter is a small organization whose movements are very private, and therefore its action is limited, and its influence trifling. It is the opinion of some that its existence is superfluous. We turn, then, to the Foreign Aid. This Society is chiefly supported by evangelical members of the Church of England. Two of its executive, the Rev. Richard Burgess, the Secretary, and the Hon. Arthur Kinnaird undertook a journey to Northern and Central Italy in September last, for the laudable purpose of making themselves acquainted with the field. From a very interesting report of this journey, we gather a number of facts in the main harmonising with our own convictions already expressed. We cannot sufficiently commend the candour and truthfulness of this report, coming, as it does, from those who

* “Quarterly Reporter of the Evangelical Continental Society;" where however all the facts are not named. † Report of the “Foreigners' Evangelization Committee at Nice," Nov. 1859.

at the disbelieve that appeal has pe

might have been expected to withhold their due meed of praise from the irregular modes of religious activity they witnessed and yet admired. They describe with great fairness and accuracy what they witnessed at Turin, Milan, Florence, Genoa, and elsewhere; and the general impression their statement leaves upon the mind is, that it will be a shame and sorrow to England in after years if British Christians now stand aloof from their brethren now labouring to spread the Gospel in Italy. We are not aware to what extent their appeal has been responded to; but we have reason to believe that hitherto a very limited sum has been placed at the disposal of the Foreign Aid Society for this object. of course, the claim is yet new, and popular interest must gradually be awakened in it.*

And now comes the Evangelical Continental Society, which is supported almost entirely by Nonconformists. We find that this society has issued a series of appeals on behalf of Italy from the commencement of the opportunity in its favour. These appeals have been widely circulated, and extracts from its correspondence have been published. And with what result ? At a soirée held in London, on the 1st of February, the secretary announced that the subscriptions for Italy amounted to three hundred pounds. This is but a paltry sum, and seems to be a reproach to British Nonconformists. Why, compare this with the large amounts enthusiastically forwarded to Garibaldi to buy rifles and gunpowder. The list is before us, and we find that only one Dissenting congregation in all England has contributed six pounds as a collection

* This letter from Mrs. Desanctis may interest English readers in the school that is so admirably conducted by her husband and herself :-

6 July 23. “I am anxious to give you a few details of the examination which took place on the 20th instant. It would have rejoiced your heart to have seen how the numbers have increased. Every seat in the chapel was taken up by these dear children, and their happy countenances showed how delighted they were that the long-expected day had at last arrived. At one end of the room were placed two tables, one containing the prizes and upon the other were exhibited a variety of things, such as shirts, collars, samplers, &c., which had been made by the elder girls ;--letters written in French and Italian, copy-books and several other things written by both boys and girls. There was also a list containing the names of all the children, showing how many had been regular in attending the Sunday school, and another list of good conduct. But all eyes were directed to the table contain: ing the prizes, where besides the Bibles and Testaments, and other neatly bound books, were the two large silver medals, the gift of our valued friend Gavazzi, for the two boys who had made the greatest progress in knowledge of the Holy Scriptures.

“It was sweet to hear these dear children lift up their voices in praising the Lord. All joined in chorus most sweetly. After the Hymn was sung, Dr. Desanctis came forward with the Bible in his hand, and commenced the examina. tion. Two of the boys, Carnano and Bernato, showed such thorough acquaintance with God's Word that there was no doubt that each deserved the honoured price : their answers were so correct and given in such exact Scripture language.

on behalf of Italy; and though the sum is small, it is worthy of record, showing one honourable exception among the thousand free churches of England. We shall not plead for the two societies we have alluded to; but we must say that, as the only two societies in England which profess to assist in the present Italian movement, they ought to have received more than five or six hundred pounds from all classes of British Christians for the work's sake, if not for their own. The little they have raised has been principally given to the Waldenses and the two committees at Geneva and at Nice.

We are aware that an impression is abroad that the Italian work is very insignificant—that what little is done must be kept secret-and that money is not required to aid it. As to the first, the Italian work is small, if compared with the millions who inhabit the country. But it is large when contrasted with what it was a year ago, and for many years previously; it is large when it is considered that scarcely fifty missionaries and colporteurs are engaged ; and it is large if we bear in mind the immense extent of territory thrown open, and the possibility of an increase. To our minds it is enough that Italy is the field. As to the second affirmation, that pecuniary aid is not required, it is an amiable delusion whereby to excuse an unwilling mind; but the facts we have cited must dispel it. With regard to the third point, the statement is partially true; and this is the chief reason why we have refrained in this paper from giving statements through which any danger could accrue to the unprotected and scattered evangelists who are now doing the work of God. We regret this necessity imposed on us, as the narration of facts known to us would enlist sympathy more effectually than any other appeal.* But the public prints abound in details quite explicit enough to show the character and bearings of the movement. It is certain that the Pope and the Italian archbishops and bishops do not look on with indifference. They have uttered the most absurd and exaggerated assertions about it, misrepresenting it in every way, and they have thundered out their anathemas against all who favour and promote it. His Holiness, for example, says to his Irish supporters, “Let

* The prudence that is required by Christian men in Italy is indicated in the touching words of one of her noble sons, who thus writes :

“In order not to ruin everything by too hot a zeal, I must, for the present, remain silent, merely observing and studying our affairs. Until the fate of Central Italy is deci led, we must not risk the great cause of the Gospel. Not that I see Italy unprepared-she is even very much prepared—but the temporary governments are so timid, they take fright at the very mention of the preaching of the Gospel. ... I have found, even more than I expected, minds disposed to abandon Popery, when there shall be liberty to spcak freely."

us unite in invoking the patronage of all the blessed in heaven, especially of the immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, that the pest of heresy and schism, which men the most wicked are striving to introduce into the regions of Italy, may be driven from them ?” It has been truly said that this passage proves what spirit they are of, and forcibly reminds us of that admirable scene in the Pilgrim's Progress, where Bunyan says of old giant Pope, “He can now do little more than sit in his cave's mouth, grinning at pilgrims as they go by, and biting his nails, because he cannot come at them, saying, “You will never mend till more of you be burned.'* It is true the terrors of the auto da tè are over, even in Italy; but this is no reason why we should be at all indifferent to those who are striving to plant the standard of Christ's cross upon the summits of Italy. Their dangers are great, the work is urgent. They are sober, earnest men, fearing God. Hitherto they have prospered; and if they have not created a national movement, they have everywhere found acceptance; and they look with especial confidence to free and Protestant England for sympathy and succour. We are persuaded that when the reality and power of the work are understood among us, thousands will be ready to help them, and to wish them God-speed.

Brief Hotices.

JOIN ANGELL JAMES: A Review of his į raised by the affection of Dr. Camp

History, Character, Eloquenee, and bell to the zealous labours, the great
Literary Labours; with Dissertations on talents, the single and hallowed pur-
tho Pulpit and the Press, Academic pose of his life-long friend. It does
Preaching, College Reform, &c. By
John Campbell, D.D. London: John

not profess to be a biography. It is Snow. 1860.

an eloge, written with the pathos of

mourning and with all the glow of This valuable work demands a further admiring friendship. So it subdues notice at our hands. Being received and animates the reader with varying by us just before the publication of our but powerful emotions. Dr. Camparticle last month on John Angell bell, under the natural prompting of James, we were unable to exhibit the his admiration for Angell James, has scope and variety of the contents of proposed to himself a double task in this volume, or to estimate its ability. his memorial volume--viz., to recond Now, however, we are prepared to do the chief events and results of Mr. both. It is a splendid monument | James's life, and also to set forth his

“Quarterly Reporter of Evangelical Continental Society," p. 0.

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