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they have more leisure they will come to reflect upon these things in the light of their circumstances, and will decide for themselves, whether they will be Presbyterians, Episcopalians, or Congregationalists. Experience will gradually teach them what form is most conducive to the interests of the Gospel in their country, and which harmonises best with the policy that is suitable to their circumstances.

We have not dwelt too long on these questions, seeing the are of vital importance, and persons are found ready to qualify the tendencies to delay organization in Italy, as Plymouthism and forth. To us it matters little what the Italians are called, provided they make good claim to the name of Christians and this they have done. All of them showed an apostolie zeal during the late war, and, backed by the noble liberality of the British and Foreign Bible Society, they commenced a system of colportage which has gone on to this day. The Society just named, with true Christian disinteresteciness supports twelve or fourteen agents of different kinds, who labein every part of Italy now open; and we have no douk are quite ready to distribute the “Word of God," in what is absurdly styled the “Patrimony of St. Peter," the moment Peter's writings cease to be interdicted. The Religious Tract Society is another helper in the work, and is rendering good service in its own quiet and effective way. Vast numbers of Italian Bibles, and useful books and tracts have been put into circulation, and either secretly or, openly they are extensively read. Evangelists and private Christians read and expound the Scripture to the people: and every night, in a multitude of places, converts and inquinta meet for conference and prayer. In the principal cities, and in some smaller towns, meetings are held for the public preaching of the Gospel. Sorne of these meetings are largely attended, and are always characterised by seriousness, propriety, and derrum. ('hurches have been formed, the members of which a wimble to celebrate the Lord's Supper. A few schools, chiefly on a sm"!! scale, have been opened for the instruction of the young. In .. word, a great work has been accomplished, and that both linek and indirectly. Prejudices have been subluel, e ngleil religion is better understood ; its professors are no longer nkank as monsters, and curiosity has been awakened. This is much to say, and what no one would have vunture to predict a few short months ago

Whence, it may be asked, come the means to carry on the operations? We have already named the Bible and Tract Societies but these are not all. The converts themselves are some of them most liberal and self-denying For example, recently one of them

received a sum of money, left as a legacy to his wife. This sum he immediately devoted to the purchase and fitting up of a house for public worship, in order to overcome the difficulty of finding proper accommodation.* Many of them give all the time and money they can to help on the work. But since they are for the most part poor, and new openings are continually presenting themselves foreign aid is imperatively required. To supply this, there is the Committee for Italian Evangelization at Geneva, which does more than contribute money, inasmuch as it, to a certain extent, directs the movements of its agents. The principal member of this Committee is the excellent Colonel Tronchin. Another Committee exists at Nice, mainly composed of Englishmen, and this, like its Genevan colleague, not only collects, but looks after the appropriation of its funds. It is much the same with the Waldenses. Then there are certain individuals who superintend the distribution of funds entrusted to them. In England, there are generous and devoted Christians who give or collect money for the same purpose, and the case may be the same elsewhere. Sympathy is all very well, but money must be had, for rents have to be paid, and the expenses of the meetings must be met. Evangelists, with their wives and families, must be kept from starvation, and books must be purchased. Travelling involves an outlay; and when the converts have done their utmost, a wide margin remains to be filled up. In some cases, agents have to be trained, and fitted for their work. But to return to the sources of supply. There are certain committees for continental evangelization in Scotland, Ireland, and England. In Scotland the Free Church vigorously assist the Waldenses. In England, we find two Societies, the Foreign Aid and the Evangelical Continental; and also an Italian Committee. This latter is a small organization whose movements are very private, and therefore its action is limited, and its influence trifling. It is the opinion of some that its existence is superfluous. We turn, then, to the Foreign Aid. This Society is chiefly supported by evangelical members of the Church of England. Two of its executive, the Rev. Richard Burgess, the Secretary, and the Hon. Arthur Kinnaird undertook a journey to Northern and Central Italy in September last, for the laudable purpose of making themselves acquainted with the field. From a very interesting report of this journey, we gather a number of facts in the main harmonising with our own convictions already expressed. We cannot sufficiently commend the candour and truthfulness of this report, coming, as it does, from those who

"Quarterly Reporter of the Evangelical Continental Society;" where however all the facts are not named. + Report of the “Foreigners' Evangelization Committee at Nice,” Nov. 1859.

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might have been expected to withhold their due meed of praise from the irregular modes of religious activity they witnessed and yet admired. They describe with great fairness and accuracy what they witnessed at Turin, Milan, Florence, Genoa, and elsewhere; and the general impression their statement leaves upon the mind is, that it will be a shame and sorrow to England in after years if British Christians nou stand aloof from their brethn: now labouring to spread the Gospel in Italy. We are not aware to what extent their appeal has been responded to; but we have reason to believe that hitherto a very limited sum has been placed at the disposal of the Foreign Aid Society for this object course, the claim is yet new, and popular interest must gradual be awakened in it.*

And now comes the Evangelical Continental Society, which supported almost entirely by Nonconformists. We find that the society has issued a series of appeals on behalf of Italy from th commencement of the opportunity in its favour. These appeal have been widely circulated, and extracts from its correspondru have been published. And with what result ? At a soirée ! in London, on the 1st of February, the secretary announced the subscriptions for Italy amounted to three hundred pour This is but a paltry sum, and seems to be a reproach to br Nonconformists. Why, compare this with the large amou enthusiastically forwarded to Garibaldi to buy rifles and gunpowd The list is before us, and we find that only one Dissenting the gation in all England has contributed six pounds as a colle

* This letter from Mrs. Desanctis may interest English readers in the site that is so admirably conducted by her husband and herself :

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“I am anxious to give you a few details of the examination which to on the 20th instant. It would have rejoiced your heart to have seen numbers have increased. Every seat in the chapel was taken up by the children, and their happy countenances showed how delighted they were long-expected day had at last arrived. At one end of the room were place tables, one containing the prizes and upon the other were exhibited a va things, such as shirts, collars, sainplers, &c., which had been made by a girls ;-letters written in French and Italian, copy-books and several othe written by both boys and girls. There was also a list containing the nat the children, showing how many had been regular in attending the Sunday and another list of good conduct. But all eyes were directed to the table. ing the prizes, where besides the Bibles and Testaments, and other neatly books, were the two large silver medals, the gift of our valued friend (avaan two boys who had made the greatest progress in knowledge of the Holy

" It was sweet to hear these dear children lift up their voices in prais Lord. All joined in chorus most sweetly. After the Hymn was sua Desanctis came forward with the Bible in his hand, and commenced the es tion. Two of the boys, Carnano and Bernato, showed such thorough anqasi with God's Word that there was no doubt that each deserve.l the honound" their answers were so correct and given in such exact Scripture language.

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received a sum of money, left as a legacy to his wife. This sum he immediately devoted to the purchase and fitting up of a house for public worship, in order to overcome the difficulty of finding proper accommodation.* Many of them give all the time and money they can to help on the work. But since they are for the most part poor, and new openings are continually presenting themselves foreign aid is imperatively required. To supply this, there is the Committee for Italian Evangelization at Geneva, which does more than contribute money, inasmuch as it, to a certain extent, directs the movements of its agents. The principal member of this Committee is the excellent Colonel Tronchin. Another Committee exists at Nice, mainly composed of Englishmen, and this

, like its Genevan colleague, not only collects, but looks after the appropriation of its funds. It is much the same with the Waldenses. Then there are certain individuals who superintend the distribution of funds entrusted to them. In England, there are generous and devoted Christians who give or collect money for the same purpose, and the case may be the same elsewhere. Sympathy is all very well, but money must be had, for rents have to be paid, and the expenses of the meetings must be met. Evangelists

, with their wives and families, must be kept from starvation, and books must be purchased. Travelling involves an outlay; and when the converts have done their utmost, a wide margin remains to be filled up. In some cases, agents have to be trained, and fitted for their work. But to return to the sources of supply. There are certain committees for continental evangelization in Scotland, Ireland, and England. In Scotland the Free Church vigorously assist the Waldenses. In England, we find two Societies, the Foreign Aid and the Evangelical Continental; and also an Italian Committee. This latter is a small organization whose movements are very private, and therefore its action is limited, and its influence trilling. It is the opinion of some that its existence is superfluous. We turn, then, to the Foreign Aid. This Society is chiefly supported by evangelical members of the Church of England. Two of its executive, the Rev. Richard Burgess, the Secretary, and the Hon. Arthur Kinnaird undertook a journey to Vorthern and Central Italy in September last, for the laudable purpose of making themselves acquainted with the field.

a very interesting report of this journey, we gather a number of facts in the main harmonising with our own convictions already expressed. We cannot sufficiently commend the candour and truthfulness of this report, coming, as it does, from those who

Quarterly Reporter of the Evangelical Continental Society;" where however all the facts are not named.

† Report of the “Foreigners' Evangelization Committee at Nice,” Nov. 1859.

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might have been expected to withhold their due meed of praise from the irregular modes of religious activity they witnessed and yet admired. They describe with great fairness and accuracy what they witnessed at Turin, Milan, Florence, Genoa, and elsewhere; and the general impression their statement leaves upon the mind is, that it will be a shame and sorrow to England in after years if British Christians nou stand aloof from their brethren now labouring to spread the Gospel in Italy. We are not aware to what extent their appeal has been responded to; but we have reason to believe that hitherto a very limited sum has been placed at the disposal of the Foreign Aid Society for this object. Of course, the claim is yet new, and popular interest must gradually be awakened in it.*

And now comes the Evangelical Continental Society, which is supported almost entirely by Nonconformists. We find that this society has issued a series of appeals on behalf of Italy from the commencement of the opportunity in its favour. These appeals have been widely circulated, and extracts from its correspondence have been published. And with what result ? At a soirée held in London, on the 1st of February, the secretary announced that the subscriptions for Italy amounted to three hundred pounds. This is but a paltry sum, and seems to be a reproach to British Nonconformists. Why, compare this with the large amounts enthusiastically forwarded to Garibaldi to buy rifles and gunpowder. The list is before us, and we find that only one Dissenting congregation in all England has contributed six pounds as a collection

* This letter from Mrs. Desanctis may interest English readers in the schol that is so admirably conducted by her husband and herself :

“July 23. “I am anxious to give you a few details of the examination which took place on the 20th instant. It would have rejoiced your heart to have seen how the numbers have increased. Every seat in the chapel was taken up by these dear children, and their happy countenances showed how delighted they were that the long-expected day had at last arrived. At one end of the room were placed two tables, one containing the prizes and upon the other were exhibited a variety of things, such as shirts, collars, samplers, &c., which had been made by the elder girls ;-letters written in French and Italian, copy-books and several other things written by both boys and girls. There was also a list containing the names of all the children, showing how many had been regular in attending the Sunday school, and another list of good conduct. But all eyes were directed to the table contain: ing the prizes, where besides the Bibles and Testaments, and other neatly-bonnd books, were the two large silver medals, the gift of our valued friend Gavazzi, for the two boys who had made the greatest progress in knowledge of the Holy Scriptures.

“ It was sweet to hear these dear children lift up their voices in praising the Lord. All joined in chorus most sweetly. After the Hymn was sung, Dr. Desanctis came forward with the Bible in his hand, and commenced the examination. Two of the boys, Carnano and Bernato, showed such thoroughi acquaintane with God's Word that there was no doubt that each deserved the honoured prize: their answers were so correct and given in such exact Scripture language.

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