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Books Books 1 - 9 of 9 on Men are so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare....
" Men are so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour, so infinite is the profitt of sugar workes. . . ."20 By 1770, the West Indies were importing most of the continental colonies' exports... "
Irish-American Trade, 1660-1783 - Page 17
by Thomas M. Truxes - 2004 - 464 pages
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The Cavaliers & Roundheads of Barbados, 1650-1652: With Some Account of the ...

Nicholas Darnell Davis - Barbados - 1887 - 261 pages
...which at present is very scarce, by reason of 5 or 6 months daythe, and not that only, but men are so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour, soe infinite is the profitt of sugar workes after once accomplished....
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Creating the Commonwealth: The Economic Culture of Puritan New England, Volume 2

Stephen Innes - History - 1995 - 405 pages
...prepared to pay high prices to get it. As Governor Winthrop was informed in 1647, the Barbadians were "so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour, soe infinite is the profitt of sugar workes. ..." A severe drought...
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The Cambridge Economic History of the United States

Stanley L. Engerman, Robert E. Gallman - Business & Economics - 1996 - 500 pages
...164os. In 1647 a correspondent from the islands wrote to John Winthrop in Massachusetts that "Men are so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour, so infinite is the profit of sugar workes after once accomplished."22...
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From Dependency to Independence: Economic Revolution in Colonial New England

Margaret Ellen Newell - Business & Economics - 1998 - 329 pages
...steadily after mid-century. As early as 1647, New England travelers noted that Barbadian settlers "are so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour, soe infinite is the profitt of sugar workes after once accomplished."...
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Sugar and Slavery: An Economic History of the British West Indies, 1623-1775

Richard B. Sheridan - Business & Economics - 1974 - 529 pages
...to your porte to trade for provisions for the belly, which at present is very scarce . . . men are so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour, soe infinite is the profltt of sugar workes after once accomplished'.1...
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American Colonies

Alan Taylor - History - 2002 - 526 pages
...with New England. In 1647, Governor John Winthrop of Massachusetts explained that the Barbadians were "so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour, soe infinite is the profitt of sugar workes after once accomplished."...
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Global Backlash: Citizen Initiatives for a Just World Economy

Robin Broad - Business & Economics - 2002 - 347 pages
...foodstuffs. In 1647 an observer in the West Indies wrote to Governor Winthrop of Massachusetts: "Men are so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour, so infinite is the profitt of sugar workes. . . .":" By 1770,...
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Englishmen Transplanted: The English Colonization of Barbados, 1627-1660

Larry Dale Gragg - History - 2003 - 217 pages
...sugar production, they devoted ever fewer acres to food production and, as Richard Vines explained, became 'so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour'.98 Moreover, as the planters cleared the island of trees to...
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Tropical Babylons: Sugar and the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1680

Stuart B. Schwartz - History - 2004 - 347 pages
...striking testimony of Barbadian planter Richard Vines, in a i647 letter to Jobn Wintl:rop: "Men are so intent upon planting sugar that they had rather buy foode at very deare rates than produce it by labour, soe infinite is the profitt of sugar workes after once accomplished."'...
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