The British Critic and Quarterly Theological Review, Volume 22

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Printed for F. and C. Rivington, 1803
 

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Page 479 - Ireland the Catholic faith is overcome ;' therefore, for the glory of the mother Church, the honour of St. Peter, and your own secureness, suppress heresy and his holiness's enemies...
Page 679 - Him that overcometh will I make a pillar in the temple of my God , and he shall go no more out: and I will write upon him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, which is new Jerusalem, which cometh down out of heaven from my God : and I will write upon him my new name.
Page 378 - Scaliger compares to the labours of the anvil and the mine ; that what is obvious is not always known, and what is known is not always present ; that sudden fits of inadvertency will surprise vigilance, slight avocations will seduce attention, and casual eclipses of the mind will darken learning; and that the writer shall often in vain trace his memory at the moment of need for that which yesterday he knew with intuitive readiness...
Page 623 - ... no more the likeness of something existing without us than the names that stand for them are the likeness of our ideas, which yet upon hearing they are apt to excite in us.
Page 378 - ... sudden fits of inadvertency will surprise vigilance, slight avocations will seduce attention, and casual eclipses of the mind will darken learning; and that the writer shall often in vain trace his memory at the moment of need, for that which yesterday he knew with intuitive readiness, and which will come uncalled into his thoughts to-morrow.
Page 41 - ... other virtues and good deeds, which we either have done, shall do, or can do, as things that be far too weak, and insufficient, and imperfect, to deserve remission of our sins, and our justification...
Page 73 - I befeech you, that ye walk worthy of the " vocation wherewith ye are called ; with all low" linefs and meeknefs, with long-fuffering, forbear" ing one another in love ; endeavouring to keep " the unity of the fpirit in the bond of peace...
Page 224 - True fortitude of understanding consists in not suffering what we know to be disturbed by what we do not know. If we perceive a useful end, and means adapted to that end, we perceive enough for our conclusion. If these things be clear, no matter what is obscure. The argument is finished.
Page 645 - I begin to be tired of my humility : I have carried my complaisances to you farther than I ought. You make new scruples : you have a great deal of fancy; and your distrusts being all of your own making, are more immovable than if there were some real ground for them.
Page 629 - The probability of an event may be said to be more or less, according to the number of chances by which it may happen, compared with the whole number of chances by which it may either happen or fail.

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