The History of Huntingdon: From the Earliest to the Present Times

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A.P. Wood, 1824 - Huntingdon (England) - 338 pages
 

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Page 223 - Thy instruments, to depend more upon Thyself. Pardon such as desire to trample upon the dust of a poor worm, for they are Thy People too. And pardon the folly of this short Prayer : — Even for Jesus Christ's sake. And give us a good night, if it be Thy pleasure. Amen.
Page 200 - ... that if the Remonstrance had been rejected he would have sold all he had the next morning, and never have seen England / more ; and he knew there were many other honest men of the same resolution.
Page 226 - I knew not, — very ordinarily apparelled ; for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country-tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean ; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar. His hat was without a hatband. His stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side...
Page 210 - When it was first moved in the House of Commons," says Clement Walker, " to proceed capitally against the King, Cromwell stood up and told them, that if any man moved this upon design, he should think him the greatest traitor in the world ; but since providence and necessity had cast them upon it, he should pray God to bless their counsels...
Page 372 - ... ordained, or provided, or any other thing, cause, or matter, whatsoever, in any wise notwithstanding. In witness whereof, we have caused these our letters to be made patent. Witness ourself at Westminster, the 23d day. of May, in the seventh year of our reign of England, France, and Ireland, and of Scotland the * * * * Per ipsum Regem.
Page 226 - ... made by an ill country tailor. His linen was plain, and not very clean ; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar : his hat was without a hatband. His stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side ; his countenance swoln and reddish : his voice sharp and untuneable ; and his eloquence full of fervour — for the subject matter would not bear much of reason, it being in behalf of a servant of Mr.
Page 202 - are most of them old decayed serving men, and tapsters and such kind of fellows and,' said I, 'their troops are gentlemen's sons, younger sons and persons of quality. Do you think that the spirits of such base and mean fellows will ever be able to encounter gentlemen that have honour and courage and resolution in them?
Page 222 - Lord, though I am a miserable and wretched creature, I am in Covenant with Thee through grace. And I may, I will, come to Thee, for Thy people. Thou hast made me, though very unworthy, a mean instrument to do them some good, and Thee service...
Page 184 - Caesar or great Alexander; Licking my feet, and wondering where I got This precious ointment. How my pace is mended! How princely do I speak ! how sharp I threaten ! Peasants, I'll curb your headstrong impudence, And make you tremble when the lion roars, Ye earth-bred -worms. O, for a looking-glass! Poets will write whole volumes of this scorce; 2 Where's my attendants? Come hither, sirrah, quickly; Or by the wings of Hermes...
Page 202 - I raised such men as had the fear of God before them, and made some conscience of what they did, and from that day forward, I must say to you, they were never beaten, and wherever they were engaged against the enemy they beat continually...

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