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THE

POETIC READER,

CONTAINING

Selections from the most approved authors, designed for Exercises in Reading, Singing, Parsing, Herme

neutics, Rhetoric and Punctuation ;

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DisTRICT OF CONNECTICUT, ss. Be it remembered, That on the sixteenth day of May, in the fifty-third year of L. S. the Independence of the United States of America, Joseph Emerson, of the said

District, hath deposited in this office the title of a Book, the right whereof he claims as Author and Compiler, in the words following, to wit :

“ The Poetic Reader, containing selections from the most approved authors, designed for exercises in Reading, Singing, Parsing, Hermeneutics, Rhetoric and Punctuation; to which are prefixed, directions for reading. By Joseph Emerson, Principal of the Female Seminary, Wethersfield.”

In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned.”—And also to the act, entitled, "An act supplementary to an act, entitled . An act for the encourage. ment of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned,' and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints."

CHARLES A. INGERSOLL,

Clerk of the District of Connecticut.
A true copy of Record, examined and sealed by me,

CHARLES A. INGERSOLL,

Clerk of the District of Connecticut.

NOTICE.-The reader is requested to make the following corrections, In No. 11, line 19, after in insert the; in No. 14, line 22, erase every.

INTRODUCTION.

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Poetry and music are nearly allied. They begin the music here?” And here the music agree in their grand effects; and when prop we may begin. A few notes we may catch, erly united, the effect of each is heightened | imperfect indeed; but a few notes we may by the other. The praise due to one, may be catch, of that enrapturing song. And here generally claimed by the other.

the music we must begin, or never join the Music and poetry are reckoned among the chorus of the skies. We must at least, begin fine arts. Nothing can better deserve the to sing in spirit, if not in words; and in heart,

No art is better suited to call forth unite with those, who thus show forth the the finest feelings of sensibility, to kindle and praises of Him, who has called them out of cherish the tender, delicate, thrilling emotions darkness into his marvellous light. of taste, or to impart refinement, elegance and How important, that all who are sufficientelevation to our blest faculties. But this is ly gifted with musical powers, should here not their highest, much less, their only praise. commence the heavenly art, that they may They are useful arts, and of these among the thus edify themselves and their fellow trav. most useful. If rightly employed, they are ellers to glory! How desirable, that from peculiarly fitted to mend the heart; to render every religious assembly, every school, every the lessens of wisdom doubly efficacious; to collection, gathered together in the name of excite, increase and prolong every holy affec- the Lord, even though but two or three in tion; to bring down heaven to earth ; to raise number-how desirable, that the incense of the soul to heaven. For this, they were des- praise, kindled by the voice of melody, should tined by the Author of nature; and for this, be wafted to heaven ! they have been used from the beginning of Are you unwilling to make the attempt, time. Of the life-giving oracles, much was without a bright prospect of excelling? Are written in poetry, and much designed to be you willing to do nothing, if you cannot do sung. By these sacred songs, the inhabitants more than others? How little would be of Zion, in every age, have been consoled and done, if all should adopt such a principle. cheered, and borne upward in their course to What if every star, except the very brightest, glory. Many ten thousands, besides the or those of the first magnitude, should fall sweet psalmist of Israel, have confidently ap- from the spiritual firmament? If you have pealed to the Searcher of hearts, " Thy stat- but one talent, must you needs hide it in a utes have been my songs in the days of my napkin? Should you not be very thankful pilgrimage,” giving glory to Him, - that giv for one talent ; and if possible, make it ten? eth songs in their night."

Would you not rather be a door-keeper in the The contemner of sacred song is the des. house of the Lord, than to reign in the tents piser of angels and of heaven. When the of wickedness?-to be the least in heaven, foundations of the earth were laid, the morn than the greatest on earth? But how does it ing stars sang together, and all the sons of appear, that you cannot excel? If you make God shouted for joy. And the ransomed of the very utmost efforts, with ardent prayer the Lord shall return, and come to Zion, with and humble trust, how much better may God songs and everlasting joy upon their heads. do for you, than you have dared to hope ? Singing seems to be in a great measure, the How many has he placed among the chief business of heaven. The trophies of almigh- singers, and long honored as the edifiers of ty Grace are a blessed company of musicians, his people, who once felt that their powers a continually increasing choir, shouting forth were nothing! the praises of Immanuel, Unto him that lov. Some have contended, that all should sing ed us, and washed us from our sins in his own - that all have been furnished with such mublood, and hath made us kings and priests sical talents, as might be improved, and used into God and his father, to him, be glory for the benefit of themselves and others. If and dominion forever and ever.

While wo

this opinion is not perfectly correct, it is soom listening to their exalted and ever rising doubtless ten times nearer the truth, than the strains, how can we but exclaim, “I would common opinion, that comparatively few can

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