Herbert Lacy, Volume 1

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Carey, Lea & Carey, 1828
 

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Page 95 - Heaven doth with us as we with torches do ; Not light them for themselves : for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike As if we had them not...
Page 210 - True generosity rises above the ordinary rules of social conduct, and flows with much too full a stream to be comprehended within the precise marks of formal precepts. It is a vigorous principle in the soul, which opens and expands all her virtues far beyond those which are only the forced and unnatural productions of a timid obedience.
Page 85 - Now wanton'd, lost in flags and reeds, Now starting into sight, Pursued the swallow o'er the meads With scarce a slower flight. It was the time when Ouse display'd His lilies newly blown; Their beauties I intent survey'd, And one I wish'd my own.
Page 8 - There are but three ways for a man to revenge himself of the censure of the world ; to despise it, to return the like, or to endeavour to live so as to avoid it : the first of these is usually pretended, the last is almost impossible, the universal practice is for the second.
Page 188 - Sweet pliability of man's spirit, that can at once surrender itself to illusions, which cheat expectation and sorrow of their weary moments! Long long since had ye number'd out my days, had I not trod so great a part of them upon this enchanted ground; when my way is too rough for my feet, or too steep for my strength, I get off it, to some smooth velvet path which fancy has...
Page 29 - Tis not so hard to counterfeit joy in the depth of affliction, as to dissemble mirth in company of fools. Why should I call 'em fools? The world thinks better of 'em; for these have quality and education, wit and fine conversation, are received and admired by the world. If not, they like and admire themselves. And why is not that true wisdom? for 'tis happiness...
Page 17 - London road, which he calls living in the country — and yet you must find fault with his situation ! — What if he has made a ridiculous gimcrack of his house and gardens, you know his heart is set upon it ; and could not you commend his taste ? But you must be too frank ! — " Those walks and alleys are too regular, — those evergreens should not be cut into such fantastic shapes...
Page 72 - I love you, dear morsel of modesty, I love ; and so truly, that I'll make you mistress of my thoughts, lady of my revenues, and commit all my moveahles into your hands; that is, I'll give you an earnest kiss in the highway of matrimony.
Page 147 - Though this did not prevent her from having some other little flirtations on hand , and being pretty well known to a certain set, she really was much attached to Benschoten , and he loved her as much as it was in his nature to love any one but himself. Without much reputation for cleverness, it was nevertheless she and she only who discovered the secret of his desperate condition and intended departure, as women will find things out even when not particularly brilliant.

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