Shakespeare's Macbeth

Front Cover
Merrill, 1911 - 177 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 112 - Hell is murky ! — Fie, my lord, fie ! a soldier, and afeard ? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account? — Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him ? Doct. Do you mark that ? Lady M. The thane of Fife had a wife ; where is she now° ? — What, will these hands ne'er be clean ? — No more o' that, my lord, no mor.e o' that : you mar all with this starting.
Page 44 - It is too full o' the milk of human kindness, To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great ; Art not without ambition, but without The illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly, That wouldst thou holily ; wouldst not play false, And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'dst have, great Glamis, That which cries, "Thus thou must do, if thou have it" ; And that which rather thou dost fear to do, Than wishest should be undone.
Page 70 - Tis much he dares; And, to that dauntless temper of his mind, He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valour To act in safety. There is none, but he Whose being I do fear : and, under him, My genius is rebuk'd; as, it is said, Mark Antony's was by Caesar.
Page 45 - The effect and it ! Come to my woman's breasts, And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers, Wherever in your sightless substances You wait on nature's mischief! Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry " Hold, hold !
Page 91 - Though you untie the winds, and let them fight Against the churches : though the yesty waves Confound and swallow navigation up ; Though bladed corn be lodged, and trees blown down ; Though castles topple on their warders...
Page 57 - Methought I heard a voice cry "Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep," the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast, — Lady M. What do you mean? 40 Macb. Still it cried "Sleep no more!" to all the house : "Glamis hath murder'd sleep, and therefore Cawdor Shall sleep no more; Macbeth shall sleep no more.
Page 54 - Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses, Or else worth all the rest ; I see thee still, And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood, Which was not so before.
Page 76 - ... s to be done ? Macb. Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck. Till thou applaud the deed. Come, seeling night, Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day ; And with thy bloody and invisible hand Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond Which keeps me pale ! — Light thickens ; and the crow Makes wing to the rooky wood : Good things of day begin to droop and drowse; Whiles night's black agents to their prey do rouse.
Page 126 - And thou opposed, being of no woman born, Yet I will try the last : before my body I throw my warlike shield : lay on, Macduff ; And damn'd be him that first cries ' Hold, enough ! [Exeunt fighting.
Page 75 - In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake us nightly : better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstasy.

Bibliographic information