The Medical and Physical Journal: Containing the Earliest Information on Subjects of Medicine, Surgery, Pharmacy, Chemistry, and Natural History ..., Volume 16

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R. Phillips, 1806 - Chemistry

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Page 281 - Hospital adjoining, are so arranged, that no two of them interfere in the hours of attendance ; and the whole is calculated to form a Complete Course of Medical and Chirurgical Instruction.
Page 122 - It is a remarkable fact, and well known to many, that we are frequently foiled in our endeavours to communicate the smallpox by inoculation to blacksmiths, who in the country are farriers. They often, as in the above instance, either resist the contagion entirely, or have the disease anomalously. Shall we not be able to account for this on a rational principle?
Page 268 - This division has caused the attention of the physician and surgeon to be too exclusively directed to those diseases which custom has arbitrarily allotted to their care. The effects of local disorders upon the constitution have, in consequence, been too little attended to ; and, indeed, I know of no book to which I can refer a surgical student for a satisfactory account of those febrile and nervous affections which local disease produces, except that of Mr. Hunter."* Indeed, the very term
Page 268 - No part of the animal body can in general be very considerably disordered without occasioning a correspondent derangement in other parts of the system. Such disorder has been considered by Mr. Hunter as the result of universal sympathy. This consent of the whole constitution with its parts manifests itself, in particular instances, by a greater disturbance of the functions of some organs than of others ; and from this circumstance diseases have derived the appellations by which they are commonly...
Page 372 - Although the susceptibility of the virus of the cow-pox is, for the most part, lost in those who have had the smallpox, yet in some constitutions it is only partially destroyed, and in others it does not appear to be in the least diminished. By far the greater number on whom trials were made resisted it entirely; yet I found some on whose...
Page 166 - The acid of the juice of the crab or wilding is called by the country people verjuice, and is much used in recent sprains, and in other cases, as an astringent or repellent. With a proper addition of sugar, it is probable that a very grateful liquor might be made of this juice, but little inferior to old hock.
Page 342 - That no person shall practise as physician, unless he be a graduate of some university in the united kingdom, and has attained the age of twenty-four years. That he shall have studied the different branches of physic in an university, or other respectable school or schools of physic, during the space of five years, at least two of which shall have been passed in the university where he takes his degree.
Page 203 - THE THYROID GLAND. The design of this gland, I believe to be to defend the brain from the morbid effects of all those causes which determine the blood into it, with unusual force. My reasons for this belief are founded, 1st. upon its situation and structure. It is seated upon the anterior parts of the larynx, and is supplied with four large arteries, which return their blood by means of veins, without terminating in an excretory duct, or producing any thing like a secreted liquor.
Page 342 - That a register shall be kept of all medical practitioners in the united kingdom; and every person in future, entering upon the practice of any branch of the profession, shall pay a fine on admission, the amount and disposition of which is to be settled and specified hereafter.
Page 455 - In large and opulent towns, the distinction between the provinces of physic and surgery should be steadily maintained. This distinction is sanctioned both by reason and experience. It is founded on the nature and objects of the two professions ; on the education and acquirements requisite for their most beneficial and honourable exercise ; and tends to promote the complete cultivation and advancement of each.

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