An Abridgment of Bishop Burnet's History of His Own Times

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Page 209 - When any are to be struck in the boots, it is done in the presence of the council ; and upon that occasion almost all offer to run away. The sight is so dreadful, that, without an order restraining such a number to stay, the board would be forsaken. But the duke, while he had been in Scotland, was so far from withdrawing, that he looked on all the while with an unmoved indifference, and with an attention, as if he had been to look on some curious experiment. This gave a terrible idea of him to all...
Page iv - WILL BE PLEASED TO SEND FREELY TO ALL APPLICANTS A LIST OF THE PUBLISHED AND PROJECTED VOLUMES TO BE COMPRISED UNDER THE FOLLOWING TWELVE HEADINGS: TRAVEL ^ SCIENCE ? FICTION THEOLOGY & PHILOSOPHY HISTORY ^ CLASSICAL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE ESSAYS ^ ORATORY POETRY & DRAMA BIOGRAPHY ROMANCE IN TWO STYLES OF BINDING, CLOTH, FLAT BACK, COLOURED TOP, AND LEATHER, ROUND CORNERS, GILT TOP.
Page 28 - So having used the priest civilly, he sent him back, being satisfied that he was in his power. This conduct so much pleased Cromwell, that he read the letter in council with great satisfaction, and said, " he hoped to make the name of an Englishman as great as ever that of a Roman had been.
Page 74 - The former incumbents, who were for the most part protestors, were a grave, solemn sort of people. Their spirits were eager, and their tempers sour : but they had an appearance that created respect. They were related to the chief families in the country, either by blood or marriage ; and had lived in so decent a manner, that the gentry paid great respect to them.
Page 46 - ... of learning, and applied themselves to the matter, in which they opened the nature and reasons of things so fully, and with that simplicity, that their hearers felt an instruction of another sort than had commonly been observed before. So they became very much followed; and a set of these men brought off the city, in a great measure, from the prejudices they had formerly to the Church.
Page 129 - And he had the dexterity of insinuating himself so entirely into the greatest degree of confidence with three succeeding princes, who set up on very different interests, that he came by this to lose himself so much, that even those, who esteemed his parts, depended little on his firmness.
Page 194 - Burnet, who knew Sidney personally, gives the following character of him : " He was a man of most extraordinary courage ; a steady man, even to obstinacy; sincere, but of a rough and boisterous temper, that could not bear contradiction. He seemed to be a Christian, but in a particular form of his own : he thought it was to be like a divine philosophy in the mind; but he was against all public worship, and every thing that looked like a church.
Page 360 - The clay before she died she received the sacrament, all the bishops who were attending being admitted to receive it with her. We were, God knows, a sorrowful company ; for we were losing her who was our chief hope and glory on earth.
Page 46 - Tenison, who carried on and advanced all those good methods that he had begun in the management of that great cure. He endowed schools, set up a public library, and kept many curates to assist him in his indefatigable labours among them. He was a very learned man , and took much pains to state the notions and practices of heathenish idolatry, and so to fasten that charge on the church of Rome.
Page 39 - The angry men, that were thus disappointed of all their hopes, made a jest of the title of it, An act of oblivion and of indemnity; and said, the king had passed an act of oblivion for his friends, and of indemnity for his enemies.

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