The Oxford Entertaining Miscellany, Or, Weekly Magazine: Containing Selections from the Most Approved Authors, Original Communications, &c., &c, Volume 1

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F. Trash, 1824
 

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Page 36 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory, on this side idolatry, as much as any. He was (indeed) honest, and of an open and free nature; had an excellent phantasy, brave notions, and gentle expressions...
Page 21 - The mountains look on Marathon, And Marathon looks on the sea. And musing there an hour alone, I dreamed that Greece might still be free, For standing on the Persians' grave, I could not deem myself a slave.
Page 74 - We were all, at the first night of it, in great uncertainty of the event ; till we were very much encouraged by overhearing the duke of Argyle, who sat in the next box to us, say ' It will do — it must do ! I see it in the eyes of them.
Page 22 - Must we but blush? Our fathers bled. Earth! render back from out thy breast A remnant of our Spartan dead! Of the three hundred grant but three, To make a new Thermopylae!
Page 34 - Warwickshire for some time and shelter himself in London. It is at this time, and upon this accident, that he is said to have made his first acquaintance in the playhouse. He was received into the company then in being, at first in a very mean rank...
Page 27 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Page 72 - Doom'd, as I am, in solitude to waste The present moments, and regret the past ; Depriv'd of every joy I valued most, My friend torn from me, and my mistress lost ; Call not this gloom I wear, this anxious mien, The dull effect of humour, or of spleen ! Still, still, I mourn, with each returning day, Him* snatch'd by fate in early youth away. And her— thro...
Page 22 - Place me on Sunium's marbled steep, Where nothing, save the waves and I, May hear our mutual murmurs sweep; There, swan-like, let me sing and die: A land of slaves shall ne'er be mine— Dash down yon cup of Samian wine!
Page 22 - Trust not for freedom to the Franks, — They have a king who buys and sells : In native swords, and native ranks, The only hope of courage dwells ; But Turkish force, and Latin fraud, Would break your shield, however broad.
Page 142 - I loved her. Indeed, I did not know myself why I liked so much to loiter behind with her, when returning in the evening from our...

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